An Introduction to Greek and Latin Etymology

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Macmillan, 1872 - Greek language - 454 pages

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Page xix - are produced by effort, by expenditure of muscular energy in the throat, lungs, and mouth. This effort, like every other that man makes, he has an instinctive disposition to seek relief from, to avoid: we may call it laziness, or we may call it economy: it is in fact either the one or the other according to the circumstances of each
Page 102 - the Teutonic and Italic Aryans witnessed the transition of the oak period into the beech period, of the bronze age into the iron age, and that while the Greeks retained phegos in its original sense, the Teutonic and Italian colonists transferred the name as an appellative to the new forests that were springing up in their
Page ii - Strebens unseren Sprachorganen die Sache leicht zu machen; Bequemlichkeit der Aussprache, Ersparung an Muskelthätigkeit, ist das hier wirkende Agens.' Curtius findet in der Regelmässigen Vertretung der Laute wie in den vereinzelten Abweichungen derselben 'eine einzige Grundrichtung, die der Verwitterung, welche, schärfer gefasst, in der schlafferen Articulation gewisser Laute bestand
Page 451 - Theophrastus. The Characters of Theophrastus. An English Translation from a Revised Text. With Introduction and Notes. By EC
Page 5 - a previous state of language, in which, as in the Polynesian dialects, the two or three principal points of consonantal contact were not yet felt as definitely separated from each other.
Page 451 - First Greek Reader. Edited, after Karl Halm, with Corrections and Additions, by John EB Mayor, MA Second and Cheaper Edition. Fcap. 8vo. 3s.
Page 451 - Demosthenes on the Crown. With English Notes. By B. Drake, MA Third Edition. To which is prefixed ^SCHINES against CTESIPHON.
Page 7 - the regular series of transitions, which such a combination of the guttural and labial would present, may easily be described: the guttural may be represented by k, q, g,j, s, h, the labial by p, b, v; and these sets of letters may be permuted with
Page 452 - Second Philippic Oration. With an Introduction and Notes, translated from KARL HALM. Edited by JEB
Page 102 - in its original sense, the Teutonic and Italian colonists transferred the name as an appellative to the new forests that were springing up in their

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