Hawthorne's Works, Volume 1

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Houghton, Mifflin & Company, 1879

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Page 23 - And when our fathers were toiling at the breastwork on Bunker's Hill, all through that night the old warrior walked his rounds. Long, long may it be, ere he comes again ! His hour is one of darkness, and adversity, and peril. But should domestic tyranny oppress us, or the invader's step pollute our soil, still may the Gray Champion come, for he is the type of New England's hereditary spirit ; and his shadowy march, on the eve of danger, must ever be the pledge, that New England's sons will vindicate...
Page 153 - Amid the seeming confusion of our mysterious world, individuals are so nicely adjusted to a system, and systems to one another, and to a whole, that, by stepping aside for a moment, a man exposes himself to a fearful risk of losing his place forever.
Page 156 - ... the truth, will my nose be anxious for a closer intimacy, till the fumes of your breath be a little less potent. Mercy on you, man! The water absolutely hisses down your red-hot gullet, and is converted quite to steam, in the miniature tophet, which you mistake for a stomach.
Page 244 - Man must not disclaim his brotherhood, even with the guiltiest, since, though his hand be clean, his heart has surely been polluted by the flitting phantoms of iniquity.
Page 154 - A RILL FROM THE TOWN PUMP. (SCENE. — The corner of two principal streets.* PUMP talking through its nose.) The TOWN IJOON, by the North clock ! Noon, by the east ! High noon, too, by these hot sunbeams, which fall, scarcely aslope, upon my head, and almost make the water bubble and smoke, in the trough under my nose. Truly, we public characters have a tough time of it ! And, among all the town officers, chosen at March meeting, where is he that sustains, for a single year, the burden of such manifold...
Page 71 - Their darksome figures were intermixed with the wild shapes of their foes, and made the scene a picture of the moment, when waking thoughts start up amid the scattered fantasies of a dream.
Page 253 - There, in fact, stood the four glasses, brimful of this wonderful water, the delicate spray of which, as it effervesced from the surface, resembled the tremulous glitter of diamonds. It was now so nearly sunset, that the chamber had grown...
Page v - He was, for a good many years, the obscurest man of letters in America. These stories were published in magazines and annuals, extending over a period of ten or twelve years, and comprising the whole of the writer's young manhood, without making (so far as he has ever been aware) the slightest impression on the public. One or two among them, the
Page 155 - ... throat, if it be as thick there as it is on your cowhide shoes. I see that you have trudged half a score of miles to-day ; and, like a wise man, have passed by the taverns, and stopped at the running brooks and well-curbs.
Page 255 - Yet, by a strange deception, owing to the duskiness of the chamber, and the antique dresses which they still •wore, the tall mirror is said to have reflected the figures the three old, gray, withered grandsires, ridiculously contending for the skinny ugliness of a shrivelled grandam. But they were young : their burning passions proved them so. Inflamed to madness by the coquetry of the girl-widow, who neither granted nor quite withheld her favors, the three rivals began to interchange threatening...

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