The Shipley collection of scientific papers, Volume 33

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Page 67 - The elementary parts of all tissues are formed of cells in an analogous, though very diversified manner, so that it may be asserted, that there is one universal principle of development for the elementary parts of organisms, however different, and that this principle is the formation of cells.
Page 7 - XVIII. OF THE SCHEMATISME OR TEXTURE OF CORK, AND OF THE CELLS AND PORES OF SOME OTHER SUCH FROTHY BODIES...
Page 74 - PROCESSES, AND COLLATERAL INFORMATION IN THE ARTS, MANUFACTURES, PROFESSIONS, AND TRADES, INCLUDING MEDICINE, PHARMACY, AND DOMESTIC ECONOMY ; designed as a General Book of Reference for the Manufacturer, Tradesman, Amateur, and Heads of Families.
Page 13 - I have felt more and more that since all the higher sciences are dependent on the science of life and must have their conclusions vitiated if a fundamental datum given to them by the teachers of this science is erroneous it behoves these teachers not to let an erroneous datum pass current ; they are called on to settle this vexed question one way or other.
Page 21 - Sociology, are intended to supply the student of Social Science with data, standing towards his conclusions in a relation like that in which accounts of the structures and functions of different types of animals stand to the conclusions of the biologist.
Page 10 - Lamarckians, some influential writers are introducing the conception of there being de6nite positions of organic stability, quite independent of utility and therefore of natural selection ; and that those positions are often reached by discontinuous variation, that is, by spurts or sudden leaps of considerable amount, which are thus " competent to mould races without any help whatever from the process of selection, whether natural or sexual.
Page 9 - All that evidence collected by Mr. Darwin and others, regarded by them as proof of the inheritance of acquired characters, which was cavalierly set aside on the strength of this alleged process of panmixia, is reinstated. And this reinstated evidence, joined with much evidence since furnished, suffices to establish the repudiated interpretation.
Page 19 - ... and minus variations ; that it ignores the unceasing tendency to reversion ; and that it implies an effect out of all proportion to the cause. It is curious what entirely opposite conclusions men may draw from the same evidence. Prof. Weismann thinks he has shown " that the last bulwark of the Lamarckian principle is untenable.

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