Shakespeare's History of King Henry the Fourth, Volume 1

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Harper & brothers, 1880
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Page 108 - He hath a tear for pity, and a hand Open as day for melting charity...
Page 106 - It ascends me into the brain; dries me there all the foolish and dull and crudy vapours which environ it; makes it apprehensive, quick, forgetive, full of nimble fiery and delectable shapes ; which, deliver'd o'er to the voice, the tongue, which is the birth, becomes excellent wit.
Page 80 - There is a history in all men's lives, Figuring the nature of the times deceas'd ; The which observ'd, a man may prophesy, With a near aim, of the main chance of things As yet not come to life, which in their seeds, And weak beginnings, lie in treasured. Such things become the hatch and brood of time ; And, by the necessary form of this, King Richard might create a perfect guess.
Page 24 - How many thousand of my poorest subjects Are at this hour asleep ! — Sleep, gentle sleep, Nature's soft nurse, how have I frighted thee, That thou no more wilt weigh my eye-lids down, And steep my senses in forgetfulness...
Page 133 - I know thee not, old man: Fall to thy prayers ; How ill white hairs become a fool, and jester!
Page 205 - One word more, I beseech you. If you be not too much cloyed with fat meat, our humble author will continue the story with Sir John in it...
Page 117 - Therefore, my Harry, Be it thy course to busy giddy minds With foreign quarrels, that action, hence borne out, May waste the memory of the former days.
Page 79 - Wilt thou, upon the high and giddy mast, Seal up the ship-boy's eyes, and rock his brains In cradle of the rude imperious surge, And in the visitation of the winds, Who take the ruffian billows by the top, Curling their monstrous heads, and hanging them. With deaf ning clamours in the slippery clouds, That, with the hurly, death itself awakes...
Page 13 - The moral to be drawn from this representation is, that no man is more dangerous than he that, with a will to corrupt, hath the power to please ; and that neither wit nor honesty ought to think themselves safe with such a companion, when they see Henry seduced by Falstaff.
Page 88 - I'll ne'er bear a base mind: — an't be my destiny, so; an't be not, so: No man's too good to serve his prince ; and, let it go which way it will, he that dies this year, is quit for the next.

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