The pursuit of knowledge under difficulties [by G.L. Craik].

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Page 81 - New Experiments Physico-mechanical, touching the spring of the air, and its effects ; (made for the most part in a new pneumatical engine) written .... by the honourable Robert Boyle, Esq* experiment xxxvi.
Page 169 - ... nothing can be so unworthy of a well-composed soul as to pass away life in bickerings and litigations, in snarling and scuffling with every one about us. Again and again, my dear Barry, we must be at peace with our species, if not for their sakes, yet very much for our own.
Page 383 - Before I had learnt from the note the name and business of my visitor, I was struck with the manliness of his person, the breadth of his chest, the openness of his countenance, and the inquietude of his eye.
Page 345 - Now you will not assert, gentlemen, said I, that it is more difficult to construct a machine that shall weave than one which shall make all the variety of moves which are required in that complicated game.
Page 156 - I mention it only, as it shows the solicitude and extreme activity which he had about every thing that related to his art; that he wished to have his objects embodied as it were, and distinctly before him; that he neglected nothing which could keep his faculties in exercise, and derived hints from every sort of combination.
Page 319 - The trunk of an elephant that can pick up a pin or rend an oak, is as nothing to it. It can engrave a seal, and crush masses of obdurate metal like wax, before it, — draw out, without breaking, a thread as fine as gossamer, and lift a ship of war like a bauble in the air. It can embroider muslin, and forge anchors, — cut steel into ribands, and impel loaded vessels against the fury of the winds and waves.
Page 403 - X.— A PRELIMINARY DISCOURSE ON THE OBJECTS. ADVANTAGES. AND PLEASURES OF THE STUDY OF NATURAL PHILOSOPHY. In 1 Vol. By FJW HERSCHEL, Esq.
Page 156 - If, in his walks, he found a character that he liked, and whose attendance was to be obtained, he ordered him to his house : and from the fields he brought into his painting-room, stumps of trees, weeds, and animals of various kinds ; and designed them, not from memory, but immediately from the objects. He even framed a kind of model of landscapes on his table ; composed of broken stones, dried herbs, and pieces of looking-glass, which he magnified and improved into rocks, trees, and water. How far...
Page 29 - There is a house full of people, and right nasty. The Czar lies next your library, and dines in the parlour next your study. He dines at ten o'clock and six at night ; is very seldom at home a whole day. Very often in the King's yard, or by water, dressed in several dresses. The King is expected there this day ; the best parlour is pretty clean for him to be entertained in ; the King pays for all he has.
Page 354 - Edwards's early life, as well as for the materials of the sequel of our sketch, says, that it was while building this mill that the self-taught architect became acquainted with the principle of the arch. After this achievement, Edwards was accounted the best workman in that part of the country ; and being highly esteemed for his integrity and fidelity to his engagements, as well as for his skill, he had as much employment in his line of a common builder, as he could undertake. In his twenty-seventh...

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