The Letters of Marcus Tullius Cicero to Several of His Friends, Volume 3

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Page 10 - When I look upon the tombs of the great, every emotion of envy dies in me ; when I read the epitaphs of the beautiful, every inordinate desire goes out; when I meet with the grief of parents upon a tomb-stone, my heart melts with compassion ; when I see the tomb of the parents themselves, I consider the vanity of grieving for those whom we must quickly follow...
Page 10 - ... follow : when I fee kings lying by thofe who depofed them ; when I confider rival wits, placed fide by fide, or the holy men that divided the...
Page 17 - ... measure to have been tolerably healed : for I can now no longer lose my private sorrows in the prosperity of the commonwealth, as I was wont to dispel the uneasiness I suffered upon the public account, in the happiness I received at home. Accordingly, I have equally banished myself from my house and from the public, — as finding no relief in either from the calamities I lament in both.
Page 14 - I have frequently received ; but never any that were more obliging. As to those for which I am indebted to yourself, it is not only the force of your reasonings, and the very considerable share you take in my afflictions, that have contributed to compose my mind ; it is the deference, likewise, which I always pay to the authority of your sentiments. For knowing, as I perfectly...
Page 6 - I fhould not only have mingled my tears with yours, but affifted you with all the confolation in my power. I am fenfible at the fame time, that offices of this kind afford at beft but a wretched relief: for as none are qualified to perform them, but...
Page 193 - On these terms, he offered to give up Cisalpine Gaul, provided that he might have the greater Gaul in exchange for five years, with an army of six legions, to be completed out of the troops of D. Brutus 4.
Page 8 - ... with the care of your daughter ! Or was it in the expectation of being the joyful mother of a flourishing race, who might possess their patrimony with independence, who might gradually rise through the several dignities of the state, and exert the liberty to which they were born in the service and defence of their friends and country ? But is there one amongst all these...
Page 10 - Tomb-ftone, my Heart melts with Compaffion; when I fee the Tomb of the Parents themfelves, I confider the Vanity of grieving for thofe whom we muft quickly follow...
Page 241 - Cicero a little before his retreat into banifhment, took " a fmall ftatue of Minerva, which had long been reverenced " in his family as a kind of tutelar deity, and carrying it to " the Capitol, placed it in the temple of Jupiter, under the *' title of "Minerva the guardian of tht city.

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