A Dictionary of Arts, Manufactures, and Mines: Containing a Clear Exposition of Their Principles and Practice, Volume 2

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D. Appleton & Company, 1844 - Industries
 

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Page 743 - ... lost in the flame of the fire-damp, which in this case fills the cylinder with a pretty strong light As long as any explosive mixture of gas exists in contact with the lamp, so long it will give light, and when it is extinguished, which happens when the foul air constitutes as much as...
Page 1017 - He proved, for example, that when a metal disk is caused to rotate so as to be tangent to the lines of force, no current appears ; while when the...
Page 1180 - It is built entirely of clay, so that a couple of men may finish its erection in a few hours, and have it ready for use the next day. There is an opening in front about a foot or more in height, which is built up with clay at the commencement, and broken down at the end of each smelting operation. The bellows are usually made of a goat's skin, which has been stripped from the animal without ripping open the part covering the belly.
Page 1076 - Sometimes the yarn» are made to wind off one reel, and, having passed through a vessel of hot tar, are wound upon another, the superfluous tar being removed by causing the yarn to pass through a hole surrounded with spongy oakum ; but the ordinary method is to tar it in skeins or hanks, which are drawn by a capstan with a uniform motion through the tar-kettle.
Page 743 - ... application of a small brush. We have frequently used the lamps where the explosive mixture was so high as to heat the wire-gauze red hot; but on examining a lamp which has been in constant use for three months, and occasionally subjected to this degree of heat, I cannot perceive that the gauze cylinder of iron wire is at all impaired. I have not, however, thought it prudent, in our present state of experience, to persist in using the...
Page 743 - Besides the facilities afforded by this invention to the working of coal-mines abounding in fire-damp, it has enabled the directors and superintendents to ascertain, with the utmost precision and expedition, both the presence, the quantity, and correct situation of the gas. Instead of creeping inch by inch with a candle, as is usual, along the galleries of a mine suspected to contain fire-damp, in order to ascertain its presence, we walk firmly on with the safe-lamps, and, with the utmost confidence,...
Page 998 - ... distance, and much resembled an unsteady fire of infantry. Immense quantities of dust and small coal accompanied these blasts, and rose high into the air, in the form of an inverted cone. The heaviest part of the ejected matter, such...
Page 1180 - The apertures at the legs are tied up, and a nozzle of bamboo is fastened in the opening formed by the neck. The orifice of the tail is enlarged and distended by two slips of bamboo. These are grasped in the hand, and kept close together in making the stroke for the blast ; in the returning stroke they are separated to admit the air. By working a bellows of this kind with each hand, making alternate strokes, a tolerably uniform blast is produced.
Page 1011 - In America, where timber is in many places an incumbrance upon the soil, it is felled, piled up in pyramids and burned, solely .with a view to the manufacture of potashes. The ashes are put into wooden cisterns having a plug at the bottom of one of the sides under a false bottom; a moderate quantity of water is then poured on the mass, and some quick-lime is stirred in ; after standing for a few hours, so as to take up the soluble matter, the clear liquor is drawn off, evaporated to...
Page 898 - If strong nitrous acid, saturated with nitrous gas, be mixed with a saturated solution of muriatic acid gas, no other effect is produced than might be expected from the action of nitrous acid of the same strength on an equal quantity of water ; and the mixed acid so formed has no power of action on gold or platina. Again, if muriatic acid gas, and nitrous gas, in equal volumes, be mixed together over mercury, and...

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