The Works of Francis Bacon: Literary and professional works

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Brown and Taggard, 1860
 

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Page 182 - As for my Essays, and some other particulars of that nature, I count them but as the recreations of my other studies, and in that sort purpose to continue them ; though I am not ignorant that those kind of writings would, with less pains and embracement, perhaps, yield more lustre and reputation to my name than those other which I have in hand.
Page 214 - I think a man may speak it soberly and without bravery, that this kingdom of England, having Scotland united, Ireland reduced, the sea provinces of the Low Countries contracted, and shipping maintained, is one of the greatest monarchies, in forces truly esteemed, that hath been in the world.
Page 183 - I am not ignorant that those kind of writings would, with less pains and embracement, perhaps, yield more lustre and reputation to my name than those other which I have in hand. But I account the use that a man should seek of the publishing of his own writings before his death, to be but an untimely anticipation of that which is proper to follow a man, and not to go along with him.
Page 301 - ... or harping on that which should follow ; whereas a slow speech confirmeth the memory, addeth a conceit of wisdom to the hearers, besides a seemliness of speech and countenance.
Page 361 - Solon compared the people unto the sea, and orators and counsellors to the winds : for that the sea would be calm and quiet, if the winds did not trouble it.
Page 147 - ... distribution of the quarters of the world. The appearances of the middle sky afford him prognostications of weather. The winds sail his ships and work his mills and engines. Plants and animals of all kinds are made to furnish him either with dwelling and shelter or clothing or food or medicine, or to lighten his labour, or to give him pleasure and comfort ; insomuch that all things seem to be going about man's business and not their own.
Page 328 - There was a king of Hungary took a bishop in battle, and kept him prisoner : whereupon the pope writ a monitory to him, for that he had broke the privilege of holy church, and taken his son. The king sent an embassage to him, and sent withal the armour wherein the bishop was taken, and this only in writing, " Vide num haec sit vestis filii tui :
Page 159 - For the command over things natural, — over bodies, medicines, mechanical powers, and infinite other of the kind — is the one proper and ultimate end of true natural philosophy ; however the philosophy of the School, content with what it finds, and swelling with talk, may neglect or spurn the search after realities and works. But the riddle proposed to CEdipus, by the solution of which he became King of Thebes related to the nature of man; for whoever has a thorough insight into the nature of...
Page 397 - SIR Nicholas Bacon being appointed a judge for the northern circuit, and having brought his trials that came before him to such a pass, as the passing of sentence on malefactors, he was by one of the malefactors mightily importuned for to save his life; which, when nothing that he had said did avail, he at length desired his mercy on account of kindred.
Page 331 - The queen, apprehending it gladly, asked, " How ? and wherein ?" Mr. Bacon answered, " Because he had stolen many " of his sentences and conceits out of Cornelius

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