Travels in Kashmir, Ladak, Iskardo, the Countries Adjoining the Mountain-course of the Indus, and the Himalaya, North of the Panjab, Volume 2

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Page 140 - Therefore shall ye lay up these my words in your heart and in your soul, and bind them for a sign upon your hand, and that they may be as frontlets between your eyes.
Page 145 - Yet empty of all good, wherein consists Woman's domestic honour and chief praise; Bred only and completed to the taste Of lustful appetence, to sing, to dance, To dress, and troll the tongue, and roll the eye...
Page 130 - WATER. five minutes. They are then dried in the shade, as the hot sun spoils the colours ; and in ten days afterwards the coloured shawls undergo a similar process, but occupying less time. The white ones, after being submitted to the process, on the first day are spread in the sun, and bleached by water sprinkled over them ; they then are again...
Page 61 - Rocks, dens, and caves ! But I in none of these Find place or refuge ; and the more I see Pleasures about me, so much more I feel...
Page 133 - ... can require. His host, of course, takes care to repay himself in the end. He has an understanding with the shawl manufacturers who frequent his house, so that the guest is at the mercy of both parties : and should he quarrel with the broker, and hope to make a purchase without his intervention, he would find it impossible. No...
Page 215 - Forth rush'd the swain with hospitable haste. Straight to the lodgments of his herd he run, Where the fat porkers slept beneath the sun ; Of two, his cutlass launch'd the spouting blood; These quarter'd...
Page 133 - When the merchant has completed his purchases, the mokym, who was before so eager to obtain him as a guest, pays him the compliment of seeing him safe to the outside of the city, where he takes leave of him at Chaturbul, the very last place within it ; from which custom the brokers have obtained the cant name of Dost-i-Chaturbul, or the
Page 129 - ... floodgates at the Drogjun. Some ruins, in large limestone blocks, are lying on the washing-place, and in one of these is a round hole about a foot and a half in diameter, 'and a foot in depth. In this the shawl is placed, and water being poured over it, it is stamped on by naked feet for about five minutes, and then taken into the canal by a man standing in the water ; one end is gathered up in his hand, and the shawl swung round and beaten with great force upon a flat stone, being dipped into...
Page 60 - ... become associated with a high degree of picturesque beauty, something distinctive, if not unique in character. For, as Vigne justly remarks, " Softness mantling over the sublime, snugness generally, elsewhere incompatible with extent, are the prevailing characteristics of the scenery of Kashmir, and verdure and the forest appear to have deserted the countries on the northward in order to embellish the slopes from its snowy mountains, give additional richness to its plains, and combine with its...
Page 132 - Perhaps, again, when the merchant, half dead with fatigue ami cold, stands at length on the snowy summit of the Pir Panjal, or either of the other mountain passes, he is suddenly amazed by finding there a servant of the broker, who has kindled a fire ready for his reception, hands him a hot cup of tea, and a kabab, a delicious kaliaun, and a note containing a fresh and still more pressing invitation from his master.

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