Wharton's Law-lexicon: Forming an Epitome of the Law of England; and Containing Full Explanations of the Technical Terms and Phrases Thereof, Both Ancient and Modern. Including the Various Legal Terms Used in Commercial Business; Together with a Translation of Latin Law Maxims, and Selected Titles from the Civil, Scotch, and Indian Law

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Stevens and Sons, 1883 - Law - 882 pages
 

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Page 350 - That no contract for the sale of any goods, wares, and merchandise, for the price of ten pounds sterling or upwards, shall be allowed to be good, except the buyer shall accept part of the goods so sold, and actually receive the same...
Page 461 - Except nevertheless all leases not exceeding the term of three years from the making thereof, whereupon the rent reserved to the landlord, during such term, shall amount unto two third parts at the least of the full improved value of the thing demised.
Page 350 - No action shall be brought whereby to charge any executor or administrator, upon any special promise, to answer damages out of his own estate...
Page 499 - No man shall be taken or imprisoned upon the appeal of a woman, for the death of any other than her husband.
Page 512 - A married woman shall, in accordance with the provisions of this Act, be capable of acquiring, holding, and disposing by will or otherwise, of any real or personal property as her separate property, in the same manner as if she were a feme sole, without the intervention of any trustee.
Page 97 - A bill of exchange is an unconditional order in writing, addressed by one person to another, signed by the person giving it, requiring the person to whom it is addressed to pay on demand or at a fixed or determinable future time a sum certain in money to or to the order of a specified person, or to bearer.
Page 494 - In any action or proceeding upon a bill, the court or a judge may order that the loss of the instrument shall not be set up, provided an indemnity be given to the satisfaction of the court or judge against the claims of any other person upon the instrument in question.
Page 386 - That at the time it was negotiated to him he had no notice of any infirmity in the instrument or defect in the title of the person negotiating it.
Page 249 - That no person offered as a witness shall hereafter be excluded by reason of incapacity from crime or interest, from giving evidence, either in person or by deposition, according to the practice of the Court, on the trial of any issue joined, or of any matter or question, or on any inquiry arising in any suit, action, or proceeding, civil or criminal, in any Court, or before any judge, jury, sheriff, coroner...
Page 499 - No freeman shall be taken, or imprisoned, or be disseised of his freehold, or liberties, or free customs, or be outlawed or exiled, or any otherwise destroyed ; nor will we pass upon him, nor condemn him, but by lawful judgment of his peers, or by the law of the land.

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