Peasants in India's Non-Violent Revolution: Practice and Theory

Front Cover
SAGE Publications, Sep 22, 2004 - History - 577 pages
2 Reviews
Reviews aren't verified, but Google checks for and removes fake content when it's identified
At a time when a majority of scholars engage in studies on class, religion, ethnicity and gender, this study forcefully demonstrates that peasants as a category and their problems continue to excite considerable academic debate.

Divided into two parts, the book first reconstructs the political world of the peasants of Punjab and forms the empirical base on which rests the subsequent theoretical and methodological discussion. It captures their struggles at the national level as well as their everyday struggles on purely class or peasant issues.

The second part makes important interventions in the theoretical debates regarding the role of peasants in revolutionary transformation in the modern world. The author argues that the automatic association of revolution with large-scale violence has resulted in the refusal to recognize the non-violent yet revolutionary political practice of peasants in the Indian National Movement. The author subjects to critical scrutiny a wide range of theoretical models and argues that the political practice of the Indian peasants cannot be fit into any theoretical straightjacket.

What people are saying - Write a review

Reviews aren't verified, but Google checks for and removes fake content when it's identified
User Review - Flag as inappropriate

It is a very good book describing in detail the struggle of peasants, and the ways how these peasants were mobilized and sensitized not only against the British occupation but also were aware against the landlords oppression and exploitation.

User Review - Flag as inappropriate

What I have read all of this book . S.Ujjagar Singh Bilga should be the main character but writer must be any relative of Bhagat Singh Bilga his name every where.

Other editions - View all

About the author (2004)

Mridula Mukherjee is currently Professor of Modern Indian History and Chairperson of the Centre for Historical Studies, Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi. Professor Mukherjee has been Visiting Scholar at Duke University, USA, and at the Institute of Oriental Culture, University of Tokyo. She has also been Chairperson of the Archives on Contemporary History at Jawaharlal Nehru University. She has published widely in the areas of agrarian history, peasant movements, social movements and the Indian national movement. Her publications include India’s Struggle for Independence (1999) and India After Independence 1947–2000 (2000), both co-authored.

Bibliographic information