The Beauties of England and Wales, Or, Delineations, Topographical, Historical, and Descriptive, of Each County, Volume 10, Issue 2

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Thomas Maiden, 1816 - Architecture
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Page 447 - Kingdom, or that he ought not to enjoy the same, here is his Champion, who saith that he lieth, and is a false traitor ; being ready in person to combat with him, and in this quarrel will adventure his life against him on what day soever he shall be appointed.
Page 578 - Purge out therefore the old leaven, that ye may be a new lump, as ye are unleavened. For even Christ our passover is sacrificed for us : therefore let us keep the feast, not with old leaven, neither with the leaven of malice and wickedness ; but with the unleavened bread of sincerity and truth.
Page 589 - Tom observed to me, that after having written more odes than Horace, and about four times as many comedies as Terence, he was reduced to great difficulties by the importunities of a set of men, who, of late years, had furnished him with the accommodations of life, and would not, as we say, be paid with a song.
Page 390 - Where the word of a king is, there is power: and who may say unto him, What doest thou?
Page 405 - ... unctuous or greasy matter mixed with resin, as it seemed, had been melted, so as to exclude, as effectually as possible, the external air. The coffin was completely full ; and from the tenacity of the cere-cloth, great difficulty was experienced in detaching it successfully from the parts which it enveloped. Wherever the unctuous matter had insinuated...
Page 102 - Tutor'd by thee, hence poetry exalts Her voice to ages; and informs the page With music, image, sentiment, and thought, Never to die...
Page 585 - December 11, 1756, immediately after leaving the King's Bench Prison, by the benefit of the Act of Insolvency ; in consequence of which, he registered his kingdom of Corsica for the use of his creditors.
Page 405 - Spectators of this interesting sight were well prepared to receive this impression; but it is also certain, that such a facility of belief had been occasioned by the simplicity and truth of Mr Herbert's Narrative, every part of which had been confirmed by the investigation, so far as it had advanced: and it will not be denied that the shape of the face, the forehead, an eye, and the beard, are the most important features by which resemblance is determined.
Page 439 - Good luck have thou with thine honour : ride on, because of the word of truth, of meekness and righteousness, and thy right hand shall teach thee terrible things.
Page 439 - O thou most mighty," &c. Then, the king arising, the dean of Westminster took the armil from the master of the great wardrobe, and put it about his majesty's neck, and tied it to the bowings of his arms above and below the elbows, the archbishop, saying, " Receive this armil, as a token of the Divine mercy embracing thee on every side,

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