Page images
PDF
EPUB

Theocr. Id. xxvII. 69, by Eobanus Hessus. The Greek is önmadı

αιδόμενα, κραδία δ' οι ένδον ιάνθη. , P. 250 [4] Pythagoras, Aur. Vers. v. 12; Ta'vtwv Mádlot' aioxúveo gaútov. [10] The ed. of 1597 has 'a low,' of 1598 'Alow,' which in later editions was corrupted into 'a law. (27) accounted : 'recounted' (1598, 1606). [30] as spurres: 'the spurres' (1598, 1606).

COLOUR 4 p. 251 [9] Æsop, Fab. 38; quoted again in Adv. of L. 11. 23, $ 36. This same fable of the frogs is applied by Selden to marriage. See Table

Talk. p. 252 [10] Livy, iv. 28.

COLOUR 5 p. 254 (5] or flowers: 'as flowers' (1598, 1606). [22] Luke x. 41.

[31] The original, quoted by Zenodotus from Archilochus, is tortois ádwmms, add' éxivos év méya. Bacon found the Latin in Erasmus' Adagia, from which he transferred it to the Promus, fol 18 a. [17] Æsop, Fab. 52.

COLOUR 6 p. 256 [17] ådis Spúos, Adagia, p. 597. In the Promus, fol. 196, we find,

"Satis quercus, Enough of acornes.” [32] Æsop, Fab. 50. p. 257 [18] Virg. Æn. X. 450.

Colour 7 p. 258 [3] assimilate: 'assimulate' (1597); corrected in 1598. [6] Arist.

Meteor. I. 12. Compare Blundevile's Exercises, fol. 179 b, ed. 1594. “Next to the Fire is the Aire which is an Element hotte and moyst, & also most fluxible, pure & cleare, notwithstāding it is farre thicker & grosser as some say, towards the Poles thē elsewhere, by reason that those parts are farthest from the sun: And this Element is deuided of the naturall Philosophers into three Regions, that is to say, the highest Region, the Middle Region, and the lowest Region, which highest Region being turned about by the fire, is thereby made the hotter, wherein all fierie impressions are bredde, as lightnings, fire drakes, blazing starres and such like.

The middle Region is extreame cold by contra opposition by reason that it is placed in the midst betwixt two hotte Regions, and therefore in this Region are bred all cold watry impressions, as frost, snow, ice, haile, and such like.

The lowest Region is hotte by the reflexe of the sunne, whose beames first striking the earth, doe rebound backe againe to that Region, wherein are bred cloudes, dewes, raynes, and such like mode

rate watry impressions.” Blundevile's Exercises, fol. 179 b, ed. 1594. p. 258 [31] 'the sappe' (1598, 1606). [32] Adagia, p. 640, where it

stands, Sparta servi maxime servi. [33] Henry Noel : See

Apoph. 244. p. 259 [18] Ovid, Ars Am. 11. 662, quoted again in Adv. of L. II. 23,

$ 27. proximitate: 'procinitate(1597); corrected in 1598. [25] Matt. ix. 12.

COLOUR 8 p. 260 (10) Virg. Æn. xii. 600. malorum: 'malum' (1597); corrected

in 1598. [21] hurt; 'hart' (1597); corrected in 1598. [24] Virg.

Ecl. v. 23. [34] See the ist and 3rd Philippics. P. 261(12) Enchiridion, c. 5. [21] Ovid, Am. 1. 2. 10. p. 262 [1] Essay vill. p. 28.

COLOUR 9 p. 262 (31) Hab. i. 15, 16. p. 263 [5] Cic. pro Marcell. 9. (11) In the De Augm. VI. 3, Soph. 11,

Bacon attributes this to Solomon. See Mr Spedding's note (Works, 1. p. 685). [23] Plut. Cæs. 38. [30, 33] In both lines the ed. of 1597 has ‘imitable,' but in the corresponding passage of the De Augmentis the Latin is in one case inimitabilis, and in the other imitationem non recipiunt, and I have therefore substituted 'inimitable' in

both. P. 264 [7] Plut. Timol. 36. See Essay XL. P. 167.

COLOUR 10. p. 264 [28] Virg. Ecl. 1. 15. [29] Sybilla: see Essay xxi. p. 89. p. 265 [6] “it is more to him’ (1598, 1606). [13] Quoted by Seneca,

Ep. I. 1, § 5, and introduced with the words 'ut visum est majoribus nostris.' The original is Hesiod, Works & Days, 367, deed 8 évi Tru@uévu peidu. [16] Arist. de Gen. et Corr. I. 4. alterius: ‘vlterius' (1597); corrected in 1598. [19] The origin of this is a passage in Dem. Ol. 111. 33, which Wolf translates alimenta sunt vestrum omnium socordiæ. See Mr Ellis's note on the De Augmentis, with Mr Spedding's addition (Works, 1. 681, 682). [22] aliments; the editions of 1597, 1598, and 1606, all read 'elements,' but Bacon quotes the Latin when again referring to the passage, Adv. of L. II. 23, & 13, alimenta socordiæ. [25] One copy of the ed. of 1597 in the Cam. bridge Univ. Libr. (XVII. 38. 19) omits the words 'to say;' 'the' was added in 1598. Bacon made a memorandum of the anecdote in the Promus, fol. 46 a: “The fashion of d. Hect. to the dames of London

ye way is to be sicker." p. 266 [10] Hor. Ep. I. 2. 40. Comp. Arist. Nic. Eth. 1. 7; ápxri nulov

Travtós; Plato de Legg. vi. 753 E; Hesiod, Works & Days, 40. (24) modum: added in ed. of 1598. [27, 28] for..inception : added

in 1598. p. 267 [12] 'other'in ed. 1597; 'otherwise' (1598, 1606).

APPENDIX.

P. 279 [20] men: omitted in the MS.

APPENDIX TO THE NOTES.

In preparing the present edition I have used ten different copies of the edition of 1625, the last which had the benefit of Bacon's own revision. Of these ten copies no two are exactly alike. The differences are numerous, though, except in one case, not important; but, as they throw light upon the manner in which books passed through the press in Bacon's time, I have subjoined a list of all that I have noticed. The cause of these differences it is not difficult to conjecture. Corrections were made while the sheets were being printed off, and the corrected and uncorrected sheets were afterwards bound up indiscriminately. In this way the number of different copies might be multiplied to any extent. Instances occur in which a sheet appears in three different stages: one with two errata on one page, a second with one of the errata corrected, and a third with both corrected. Another peculiarity with regard to these copies is that they differ in the title page. Upon cxamination it appears that the original title page was as follows: “The Essayes or Covnsels, civill and morall, of Francis Lo. Vervlam, Viscovnt St. Alban. Newly enlarged. London, Printed by Iohn Haviland for Hanna Barret, and Richard Whitaker, and are to be sold at the signe of the Kings head in Pauls Church-yard. 1625." That this is the original is evident from the fact that it corresponds with the entry in the books of Stationers' Hall, and also from a memorandum in a copy of the Essays in the Cambridge Univ. Libr. (XVII. 36. 14), “Jo: Finch 300 Martij. 1625 ex dono Authoris.” The date of presentation was as early as it could well be in the year in which the book was published. Besides, on examining the copies which have the other title page, it is evident that it has been inserted. It is as follows: "The Essayes or Covnsels, civill and morall, of Francis Lo. Vervlam, Viscovnt St. Alban. Newly written. London, Printed by Iohn Haviland for Hanna Barret. 1625." From this it would seem as if the whole of the stock had come into Barret's hands, by some means or other, and that she cancelled the old title page and had a new one printed. I shall speak of these as the first and second title pages. The numbers attached to the following description of the ten copies to which I have referred, correspond with those given with the various readings. The first four have the second title page:

1. A copy in the British Museum, referred to by Mr Spedding.
2. In the Library of Trin. Coll. Cambridge (T. 2. I).
3. In the Cambridge Univ. Libr. (XVII. 36. 15).
8. In the Library of Christ's College, Cambridge (M. 1. 6).
The following have the first title page :
4. Mr Spedding's own copy.
5. A copy in the Cambridge Univ. Libr. (XVII. 36. 14.

6. 7. In the Library of St John's College, Cambridge (Bw. 7. 32; Ee. 1. 50).

9. In the Library of Christ's College, Cambridge (M. 1. 5).

10. Another copy in the possession of Mr Spedding, of which he kindly sent me the readings while the present sheet was passing through the press.

The numbers of the pages refer to the pages of these copies which are the same throughout. Of the two readings I suppose the second to be the correction of the first. p. 25 [12] Encourageth (3)-encourageth (1. 2. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10). P. 28 [2] to Knowledge (3)—to the Knowledge (1. 2. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10). p. 29 (4) both; (3)—both, (1. 2. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10). [10] Silence; (3)

Silence, (1. 2. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10). (13) secret (3)-secret (1. 2. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10). p. 39 [8] mary (2. 4)—marry (1. 3. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10). P. 79 [12] Opinion: (1. 8. 10) - Opinion :) (2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 9). p. 115 [6] Child (2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7)-Children (1. 8. 9. 10) [16] The

Counsellour Salomon (2. 3. 4. 6. 7)- The Counsellour. Salomon (1.

5. 8. 9. 10). p. 121 (10) bould (4)—bold (1. 2. 3. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10). (11] Consort (4)

Consort, (1. 2. 3. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10). [12] obnoxius (4)-obnoxious (1. 2. 3. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10). (13) both; (4)—both : (1. 2. 3. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10). [20] Life, (4) ---Life (1. 2. 3. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10). [22] Persons (4)Persons (1. 2. 3. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10). [23] Persons (4) - Persons (1.

2. 3. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10). P. 124 [1] Counsellours (4)–Counsellours (1. 2. 3. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10). p. 125 (2) times (4) - times, (1. 2. 3. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10). [9] Occasion (4)

Occasion (1. 2. 3. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10). [17] Things; (4)—Things. (1. 2. 3. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10). [20] dangers (4)—Dangers (1. 2. 3. 5. 6. 7. 8.

9. 10). p. 131 [8] Words; (4)—Words, (1. 2. 3. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10). p. 137 [24] those which, (2. 4)—those, which (r. 3. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10). p. 146 [7] Certainly (I. 3. 7. 8. 9. 10)--certainly (2. 4. 5. 6). p. 147 [1] Light: (1. 3. 7. 8. 9. 10)-Light; (2. 4. 5. 6). [6] of that (1.

3. 7. 8. 9. 10)-of that, (2. 4. 5. 6). [23] difference (1. 3. 7. 8. 9. 10)

Difference (2. 4. 5. 6). P. 150 [1] Scicilian (1. 3. 7. 8. 9. 10)-Sicilian (2. 4. 5. 6). [7] and Faces

(1. 3. 7. 8. 9. 10)-And Faces (2. 4. 5. 6). p. 151 [6] Flower of Sulphur (1. 3. 7. 8. 9. 10)-Flowers of Sulphur (2.

4. 5. 6). [9] Friend (1. 3. 7. 8. 9. 10)-Frend 12. 4. 5. 6).

(16] Friendship (1. 3. 7. 8. 9. 10)-Frendship (2. 4. 5. 6). p. 163 (7) of (4. 6. 8)-oft (1. 2. 3. 5. 7. 9. 10). p. 170 [6] Arcenalls, (4.9)-Arcenalls (1. 2. 3. 5. 6. 7. 8. 10). p. 171 [6] enow (4. 9)-enough (1. 2. 3. 5. 6. 7. 8. 10). p. 174 [22] Yeomanry 14. 9-Yeomanry, (1. 2. 3. 5. 6. 7. 8. 10). p. 175 [8] enough (4. 9)-enough, (1. 2. 3. 5. 6. 7. 8. 10). p. 201 (19] Drugs, and, (1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 8. 9. 10)-Drugs and (7). p. 202 (8) Seruice (1. 2. 4. 7)-Seruice, (3. 5. 6. 8. 9. 10). (12) Num

ber; (1. 2. 4. 7)-Number: (3. 5. 6. 8. 9. 10).

p. 203 (20) amisse: (1. 2. 4. 7)-amisse. (3. 5. 6. 8. 9. 10). p. 206 [17] Leave (3. 5. 6. 8. 9. 10)-leave (1. 2. 4. 7': p. 233 (6) Haltar (2. 4. 7)-Halter (1. 3. 5. 6. 8. 9. 10). p. 234 (17) seeds (1. 3. 6. 8. 9. 10-Seeds (2. 4. 5. 7). p. 235 (3) Fortune. (1. 3. 6. 8. 9. 10 Fortune: (2. 4. 5. 7). P. 236 (11) attentively, hee (2. 4. 7)-Attentiuely, he (1. 3. 5. 6. 8. 9. 10). p. 237 [17] Wise Men (2. 4. 7)-Wise Men, (1. 3. 5. 6. 8. 9. 10). Enuie

(2. 4. 7)--Enuy (1. 3. 5. 6. 8. 9. 10). [18] a scribe (4)-ascribe (1. 2.

3. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10). p. 240 [7] Baukes (2. 4. 7)—Bankes (1. 3. 5. 6. 8. 9. 10). [15] with that,

(2. 4. 7) --with that (1. 3. 5. 6. 8. 9. 10). (16) are. (2. 4. 7)--are: (1. 3. 5. 6. 8. 9. 10). [18] Vsury (2. 4. 7)-V'sury (1. 3. 5. 6. 8. 9. 10).

(20) part (2. 4. 7)-Part (1. 3. 5. 6. 8. 9. 10). p. 241 (3) decay (2. 4. 9)-Decay (1. 3. 5. 6. 7. 8. 10). [9] Gaine (4.9)

-Game (1. 2. 3. 5. 6. 7. 8. 10). [21] Ruin (4.9)–Ruine (1. 2. 3. 5. 6. 7. 8. 10. [last line) are (4. 9)--are (1. 2. 3. 5. 6. 7. 8. 10). p. 244 (10] V'sury (4. 9)-V'sury, (1. 2. 3. 5. 6. 7. 8. 10). p. 245 (14) Money. (4. 9)-Money: (1. 2. 3. 5 6. 7. 8. 10). p. 248 [7] to Inuent (4. 9) -to Inuent, (1. 2. 3. 5. 6. 7. 8. 10). [17] beene

done (4. 9) --beene done, (1. 2. 3. 5. 6. 7. 8. 10). [21] Ende (4)-End (1. 2. 3. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10). (last line) drawes (4)-draws (1. 2. 3. 5. 6.

7. 8. 9. 10). p. 250 (15] dispositions (1. 2. 3. 4. 6. 7. 8. 10)-Dispositions (5. 9).

(19) Hortentius (1. 2. 3. 4. 6. 7. 8. 10)---Hortensius (5. 9). p. 251 [2] surely (1. 2. 3. 4. 6. 7. 8. 10)-surely, (5.9). [6] dignity (I. 2.

3. 4. 6. 7. 8. 10)-Dignity (5. 9). [13] Vertue; (1. 2. 3. 4. 6. 7. 8. 10)

-Vertue. (5. 9). p. 266 (3) pleasure (1. 3. 8)-pleasures (2. 4. 5. 6. 7. 9. 10). [5] without

which (1. 3. 8)—without which, (2. 4. 5. 6. 7. 9. 10). p. 267 (3) Blene (1. 3. 8)—Blewe (2. 4. 5. 6. 7. 9. 10). [5] And (1. 3. 8.

9. 10)--& (2. 4. 5. 6. 7). stirred (1. 3. 8)-stooued (2. 4. 5. 6. 7. 9. 10). (10) Anemonies (1. 3. 8)-Anemones (2. 4. 5. 6. 7. 9. 10). [12] Camaïris (1. 3. 8)-Chamaïris (2. 4. 5. 6. 7. 9. 10). [13] There Come (1. 3. 8)-There come (2. 4. 5. 6. 7. 9. 10). [20] Couslip, (1. 3. 8)-Couslip; (2. 4. 5. 6. 7. 9. 10. [21] Daffadill, (1. 3. 8)—Daffadill;

(2. 4. 5. 6. 7. 9. 10). p. 268 (269) [last line) Bullies (7.9)-Bullises (1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 8. 10). p. 269 (270) [9] Hand, therefore Nothing (7.9)-hand, therfore nothing

(1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 8. 10). [12] Damask and Red (7.9)-Damask & Red (1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 8. 10). [13] Smelles (7.9)-Smels (1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 8. 10). (18) Marioram (1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 8. 10)--Marioram. (7. 9). (Obs. Copies 7 & 9 differ from all others on this page for the reason

given in note to p. 188). p. 270 (8] Pinks (1. 3. 8)--Pincks, and Gilly-Flowers (2. 4. 5. 6. 7.9. 10).

[9] and Cloue (1. 3. 8)-& Cloue (2. 4. 5. 6. 7. 9. 10). [10] Lime Tree (1. 3. 8)-Lime tree (2. 4. 5. 6. 7. 9. 10). [11] Honny-Suckles (1. 3. 8)-Hony-Suckles (2. 4. 5. 6. 7. 9. 10). [17] Water-Mints, (I.

3. 8-Water-Mints. (2. 4. 5. 6. 7. 9. 10). p. 271 [3] Garden (1. 3. 8)— Maine Garden (2. 4. 5. 6. 7. 9. 10). middest

« PreviousContinue »