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THE Dallas LETTER,

451 fessional Education - The Universities

-The Inns of Court, MODERN English Poets. “Sordelio," “ Bells

JOURNALISM. The London Press, and Pomegranates." By R. Browning. “ Casa Guidi's Windows." By Elizabeth

THEORIES OF EVIL. “Festus," "Faust," " ManBarrett Browning,

462 fred,” “ Paradise Lost,” “ Book of Job,”

A VOICE FROM THE SEA. A Letter from SANTA Rosa, Life of: Letter of M. Cousin,

Shipboard, (concluded)

467 POETRY-Last Song. By Alice Carey, The TreschARD PROPERTY (concluded). OUR G-NERAL Review (an Abstract and Chaps. VI., VII., VIII.,

474 Brief Chronicle of the Times). France

Kossuth in England-Germany and RusALBAN: A Tale of the New World, Review of, 488

sia - Italy-England - Ireland-CaliforSOME SHAKSPEARIAN AND SPENSERIAN MSS. nia-Home Items-Mexico and more An

Shakspeare's Parentage--His Schoolboy nexation,
Days and Education-His Youth and Pro. CRITICAL NOTICES,

535

536 543

NEW-YORK:

PUBLISHED AT 120 NASSAU STREET.

TERMS-FIVE DOLLARS A YEAR, IN ADVANCE. Business communications addressed to D. W. HOLLY, Publisher, Whig Review Office, 120 Nassau St.

John A. Gray. Printer, 54 Gold cor. Falton Street.

M. A. & S. ROOT'S

DAGUERREOTYPE PORTRAITS AND FAMILY GROUPS.

EIGHT FIRST PREMIUMS-SILVER MEDALS

Awarded at the Great Fairs in Boston, New-York, and Philadelphia,

CAN BE SEEN AT

M. A. & S. ROOTS GALLERIES,

363 Broadway, cor. Franklin st., N. Y., & 140 Chestnut st., Phila.

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ADMISSION FREE TO ALL.

The Messrs. Roor having yielded to the many urgent solicitations of their numerous friends to establish a branch of their

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CILIBRATID DAGTIRRIOTYPI GALLERY

in this city, have been engaged for some time past in fitting op an

ELEGANT SUITE OF ROOMS

AT

363 BROADWAY, COR. FRANKLIN ST., where they shall be most harpy to see all their numerous friends, as also strangers and citizens generally. The acknowledged high character this celebrated establishment has acquired for its pictures, and the progressive improvements made in the art, we trust, will be fully sustained, as each department at this branch is conducted by some of the same experienced and skilful artists that have been connected with it from the commencement.

The pictures taken at this establishment are pronounced by artists and scientific men unrivalled for depth of tone and softness of light and shade, while they display all the artistic arrangement of the highest effort of the Painter.

Citizens and strangers visiting the Gallery can have their miniatures or portraits taken in this unique style, and neatly set in Morocco Cases, Gold Lockets or Breastpins, Rings, &c., in a few minutes.

Heretofore an almost insurmountable obstacle has presented itself to the production of family likenesses, in regard to children. The Messrs. Root are happy to state that through an entirely new discovery of theirs, this difficulty has been overcome, as the time of sitting will not exceed two or three seconds in fair, or ten to fifteen seconds in cloudy weather.

N.B.- LADIES are recommended to dress in figured or dark materials, avoiding whites or light blues. A shawl or scarf gives a pleasing effect to the picture.

For GENTLEMEN.—A black or figured vest; also figured scarf or cravat, so that the bosom be not too much exposed.

For Children.—Plaid, striped or figured dresees, lace work. Ringlets add much to the beauty of the picture The best hour for Children is from 11 A. M. to 2 P. M. All others from 8 A, M. to 6 P. M.

Jan., '51, 12

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THE

AMERICAN REVIEW.

No. LXXXIV.

FOR DECEMBER, 1851.

THE DALLAS LETTER.

It is refreshing, after so long and pro- the pure, cool air, the fragrant forests, and the found a silence in that quarter, to obtain ripening harvests, – to postpone, until my return to

arid streets and studies, the attention to which a declaration of opinion on national politics your request is entitled. I cannot, however, feel from a leading Democrat. So great has at rest while imagining that my silence may posbeen the demand and so limited the supply sibly be misinterpreted, and therefore hasten to of late, that it is not surprising that there send you the views which you are kind enough to should be some inquiry for the political

wish repeated.

“Of the topics of your letter, dated the 4th opinions of the lesser lights that shine only inst., from Peach Point, Brazoria county, Texas, in the absence of stars of the first magni- I have long entertained definite and decided tude. Verily it is in the sphere of mind as opinions. As they are somewhat different from in that of material things: when genius, the any avowed by public men in this quarter, I divine luminary, shines not forth, the illumi- were it not that every day's progress in our great nating qualities of gas provide a pale and federal experiment confirms to me their soundness, wan substitute.

indeed their absolute necessity. I cannot work Such are the reflections awakened by a

out the safety of the Union in their absence. That perusal of the letter recently addressed by and most permanent security for as much of com

union was designed and is fitted to be the best the Hon. George M. Dallas, through the bined freedom and happiness as societies are perHon. Guy M. Bryan, of Texas, to twenty mitted to enjoy; and it has always seemed to me odd millions of glorious republicans. Moun- not merely rash and irrational, but grossly illotain scenery is supposed to exert an enlarg- gical, to disclaim or doubt any of its essential ing influence upon the ideas. Its images the opposite of consolidation. The elements ne

springs of vitality. Union, in its political sense, is of grandeur awaken all that is sublime in cessary to a bare idea of a union are antagonistic thought; its grand elevations are sugges to those of a consolidation ; and yet I cannot help tive of dignity and power; and its pure at- thinking that all the mistakes and mischiefs to mosphere removes far into the obscure dis- wbich we have been subjected, found an origin in

the habitual tendency of many very able statestance the intellectual horizon. Who will men to import from old consolidated empires their doubt the verity of this influence after lis- products of legislation and government, and to fasttening to the Delphic voice which has been en them upon the new American condition of mere uttered from Schooley's Mountain ? Hear federal union. How often do we hear and see the and judge

strictly deconstitutionalized term 'nation' substi

tuted for that of union !'- a substitute plausible SCHOOLEY's MOUNTAIN SPRING,

and innocent in the sphere of foreign nations, but NEW-JERSEY, July 25, 1851.

full of insinuating and pernicious encroachment

wherever the domestic limits, reservations and “My Dear Sir :—Having escaped the heats of guaranties are involved. It found no place in the the city, I am almost inclined, amid the beauties structure framed by the Convention of 1787. of nature which surround me here,—the high hills, Were I not at this nioment away from home, more

31

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VOL. VIII.

NO. VI.

NEW SERIES.

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