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one hand, than from fury on the other. It implies, that we are angry only upon proper occasions, and in a due degree; that we are never transported beyond the bounds of decency, or indulge a deep and lasting resentment; that we do not

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regulations it is certainly excusable, when moved only by private wrongs: and being excited by the injuries which others suffer, it bespeaks a generous mind, and deserves

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hated, by our inferiors and dependents. Let the influence it gives us be ever so great, that man must pay very dear for his power, who procures it at the expence of his own tranquillity and peace. - ;

Besides, the imitation of anger, which is easily formed, will produce the same effe&t upon others, as if the passion was

real. If therefore to quicken the slow, to rouse the inattentive, t and restrain the fierce, it is sometimes expedient that they be- h lieve you are moved, you may put on the outward appearance ; of resentment. Thus you may obtain the end of anger, without the danger and vexation that attends it; and may preserve i , your authority, without forfeiting the peace of your mind. m

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