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"Vox pariter, vocisque via est tenuata: comæque
In plumas abeunt: plumis nova colla teguntur,
Pectoraque, et tergum: majores brachia pennas
Accipiunt, cubitique leves sinuantur in alas.

Magna pedum digitos pars occupat: oraque cornu
Indurata rigent, finemque in acumine ponunt."

Stuffed specimens of this Larus (?)* were shown to us; gull-like forms, with brown coats and bent bills. The Italians call them Gabbiani: the Slavs apply the term Kaukale (Ital. Cocále) to the larger kind and Gregole to the smaller bird. Their wailing cry is that of a child-vagitus infantis similis and they are caught by swarming up the rocks at night with torches or limed poles, a dreadful trade, as is such birding everywhere.

The lighthouse employés produced spirit-specimens of a scorpion and a monstrous lizard with three tails: the original appendage had been supplied with a second which had bifurcated: they had also two snakes, one dark brown, the other lit up with greenish-white, and showing a triangular head, but no fangs. This lacertine coluber (Calopeltis insignitus, Geoff.), which some have turned

new species, Cælopeltis Neumeyeri (Verzeich. p. 57, Vienna Museum) is common in Dalmatia and Greece. The lizards, which are very numerous, are supposed to be of one species (L. viridis); but we noticed a second, apparently differing in colour and markings from the common green-yellow. There are sundry species of spiders, amongst which is a large Lycosa: centipedes, beetles, and grasshoppers are also numerous. The ground in places is covered with land-shells, especially Helix, Clausilia, Pupa, and Bulimus. M. Topich sent me a splendid specimen of a fossil univalve. M. Hänisch has collected a drawer full of "moulds"; mostly Helix. I have also seen the Pectunculus (pelosus?) of huge size, and splendid specimens of Venus. The fish require especial study: the staple article is the Sardine, whose mortal enemies, the shark and the dolphin, are never far off.

PART III.-Little Pelagosa.

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MM. Marchesetti and Stossich, intent upon collecting botanical specimens, took boat from the "Žalo," and visited Malo (Little) Pelagosa, the second largest feature of the miniature archipelago. This lumpy dome, lying to the east of the "Velika," well illustrates the luxuriance of local nomenclature. The Slav and other fishermen have given at least a hundred names to the whole group. The northern bay of the rocklet, for instance, is Pod-molo (for malo), "under the Little." To the south are the Bights of Popina, "the place of a Pope," and of Luk,† or wild garlic. East lies Mevêdina, or "She-bear" (i.e. seal) "Bay;" and Rasenj-rot, or Punto Spiedo, projects from the western flank. I cannot but suggest that "Bogaso Grande," opposite Spit-point, is the Turkish Bugház, a pass.

*We neglected to borrow one, having been told that many were in the Museum of Trieste, which proved not to be the fact. It will be some time before this mistake can be repaired.

Luk is evidently a congener of the German "Lauch," a relation to our "leek."

Local mispronunciation for Ražanja-rát, or Roasting-spit Point.

The only sign of old human occupation noticed by the visitors was a vedette like that upon the Castello-flank. The oval of rude stones, some 6 mètres by 4, and strewed with seasand about 1 foot deep, crowned the central and highest part of the dome. Attached to its crest is a triangular offset of the usual terriccio nero, or dark malm, which may consist of animal and vegetable débris: fragments of pottery nowhere appeared.

The geology and botany of the rocklet were more interesting than the vedette. Whilst the line of outliers ranged to the west of Great Pelagosa appear in shape and substance, dip and strike, to prolong the main chine of limestone, those of the opposite flank present a notable contrast. Already in the eastern part of the rock appears a yellow-red marne, which splits into lamina with parallel faces, much resembling the Argille scagliose of the Emilia, which appears in Tuscany, and in other parts of Italy, but is nowhere known in Istria and Dalmatia. This formation is generally held, in Italy and elsewhere, to be the solidified remains of the salse, or boiling muds vomited by the Apennines at the end of the Cretaceous, and before the setting in of the Tertiary, period. The distinguished Professor G. Capellini, ex-Rector of the Bologna University, refers them to a process of metamorphism by means of gaseous exhalations and thermal springs. Their signs of vulcanism, the want of fossils and of regular stratification, the frequent hornitolike openings, as if caused by gaseous explosions, the broken surfaces, and their aspect of desolating sterility, are described by my illustrious friend, now unhappily no more, Professor G. G. Bianconi, in his 'Storia Naturale dei Terreni Árdenti.'

This characteristic marne is still better developed in the rocks off Little Pelagosa, and renders the section of the latter very interesting. The dorsum which culminates to some 50 mètres is composed of the calcareous breccia which characterises the whole group; whilst a fissure, varying in breadth from 30 to 40 mètres, and splitting the dome from south-east to north-west, is filled with the porous and tufaceous, the uniform and pultaceous mass, of rosy tinge, containing a quantity of comminated flints and limestone flakes. The parts richest in silex, and where its fragments are of the largest size, are those resting immediately upon the calcaire: from the centre of the rocklet, where is the greatest depression in the fissure, these débris are almost absent.

Despite the name Luk, plants were comparatively rare on Little Pelagosa, which showed only a modicum of wild garlic. The rocklet, on the other hand, can boast of two species which are distinctly its own; and the marvel is that they never sought a home on its congenial soil by crossing the few yards of sea

wwriting them from the main formation. The first is the Centaurea Froderiet discovered by Professor Botteri, and Lamed, by Professor Vistati of Paini after the late Frederick Angustus, the botany-loving King of Saxony. It resembles the Centaurea Diomedea of the Tremiti, discovered by Professor Gasparrini. It is said to be found upon the almost inaccessible Pomo (Jabuka) Rock; and its leaves, like other congeners of the Gentian subclass, suggest a superior tonic bitter.” Again the Anthyllis barba-Jovis is found upon the Little but not on the Great Pelagosa; and Convolvulus eneorum, so common in the former, appeared only in one spot of the latter.

After four days of pleasant retreat beyond wars and rumours of wars, we left the lighthouse with cordial thanks to our hospitable and attentive hosts, M. M. Topich. The only serious fault of our second visit to Lissa was its short duration; and here we bade a temporary adieu to our friends, with a “Hip. hip, hurrah” à l'Anglaise, that seemed to revive the memories of more stirring times. The good ship La Pelagosa got up steam on September 27, and in twenty-four hours we had covered the 220 miles separating Lissa from Trieste.

III.-An Account of the Country traversed by the Second Column of the Tal-Cho'tiali Field Force in the Spring of 1879. By Lieut. R. C. TEMPLE, F.R.G.S., M.R.A.S., &c., Bengal Staff Corps; lately attached to the 1st Goorkha Light Infantry.

[WITH MAP.]

I.-INTRODUCTORY.

Scope of Observation.-As by the rules of this Society the authors of papers are held solely responsible for their contents, the present writer thinks it advisable to make a statement of the circumstances under which the inquiries resulting in these notes were made. When General Biddulph was directed to return with his force from Candahar to India by the unknown Tal Cho'tia'li route, he divided it into three columns. The first under Major Keene, 1st Punjab Infantry, with Major Sandeman as political officer, preceded the remainder by some days, and eventually reached Luga'ri Ba'rkha'n via Tal and Cho'tia'li through the Han Pass; Major Sandeman and his personal escort, however, went through the Ma'r Pass more to the westward. The second column, under Col. Sale Hill, 1st Goorkhas, with Col. Browne, R.E., as political officer, which General

separating them from the main formation. The first is the Centaurea Friderici, discovered by Professor Botteri, and named, by Professor Visiani of Padua, after the late Frederick Augustus, the botany-loving King of Saxony. It resembles the Centaurea Diomedea of the Tremiti, discovered by Professor Gasparrini. It is said to be found upon the almost inaccessible Pomo (Jabuka) Rock; and its leaves, like other congeners of the Gentian subclass, suggest a superior tonic " bitter." Again the Anthyllis barba-Jovis is found upon the Little but not on the Great Pelagosa; and Convolvulus cneorum, so common in the former, appeared only in one spot of the latter.

After four days of pleasant retreat beyond wars and rumours of wars, we left the lighthouse with cordial thanks to our hospitable and attentive hosts, M. M. Topich. The only serious fault of our second visit to Lissa was its short duration; and here we bade a temporary adieu to our friends, with a "Hip, hip, hurrah” à l'Anglaise, that seemed to revive the memories of more stirring times. The good ship La Pelagosa got up steam on September 27, and in twenty-four hours we had covered the 220 miles separating Lissa from Trieste.

III.—An Account of the Country traversed by the Second Column of the Tal-Cho'tia'li Field Force in the Spring of 1879. By Lieut. R. C. TEMPLE, F.R.G.S., M.R.A.S., &c., Bengal Staff Corps; lately attached to the 1st Goorkha Light Infantry. [WITH MAP.]

I. INTRODUCTORY.

Scope of Observation.-As by the rules of this Society the authors of papers are held solely responsible for their contents, the present writer thinks it advisable to make a statement of the circumstances under which the inquiries resulting in these notes were made. When General Biddulph was directed to return with his force from Candahar to India by the unknown Tal Cho'tia'li route, he divided it into three columns. The first under Major Keene, 1st Punjab Infantry, with Major Sandeman as political officer, preceded the remainder by some days, and eventually reached Luga'ri' Ba'rkha'n via Tal and Cho'tia'li through the Han Pass; Major Sandeman and his personal escort, however, went through the Ma'r Pass more to the westward. The second column, under Col. Sale Hill, 1st Goorkhas, with Col. Browne, R.E., as political officer, which General

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