The History of the Discovery and Settlement of America

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Harper & Brothers, 1837 - America - 570 pages

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Page 55 - October, after public prayers for success, he ordered the sails to be furled, and the ships to lie to, keeping strict watch lest they should be driven ashore in the night. During this interval of suspense and expectation, no man shut his eyes ; all kept upon deck, gazing intently towards that quarter where they expected to discover the land which had been so long the object of their wishes.
Page 56 - Spaniards, the whiteness of their skins, their beards, their arms, appeared strange and surprising. The vast machines in which they had traversed the ocean, that seemed to move upon the waters with wings, and uttered a dreadful sound resembling thunder, accompanied with lightning...
Page 55 - As soon as morning dawned, all doubts and fears were dispelled. From every ship an island was seen about two leagues to the north, whose flat and verdant fields, well stored with wood, and watered with many rivulets, presented the aspect of a delightful country. The crew of the Pinta instantly began the Te Deum...
Page 54 - ... countenance, like a man satisfied with the progress he had made, and confident of success. Sometimes he employed all the arts of insinuation, to soothe his men. Sometimes he endeavoured to work upon their ambition or avarice, by magnificent descriptions of the fame and wealth which they were about to acquire. On other occasions, he Assumed a tone of authority, and threatened them with vengeance from their sovereign, if, by their dastardly...
Page 55 - ... for three days longer ; and if, during that time, land were not discovered, he would then abandon the enterprise, and direct his course towards Spain.
Page 292 - Cubagua ; from thence he sailed to Spain, The vanity natural to travellers who visit regions unknown to the rest of mankind, and the art of an adventurer...
Page 55 - Salcedo, comptroller of the fleet, all three saw it in motion, as if it were carried from place to place. A little after midnight, the joyful sound of land ! land ! was heard from the Pinta, which kept always ahead of the other ships.
Page 52 - ... ascendant over those of other men. All these qualities, which formed him for command, were accompanied with that superior knowledge of his profession, which begets confidence in times of difficulty and danger. To unskilful Spanish sailors, accustomed only to coasting voyages in the Mediterranean, the maritime science of Columbus, the fruit of thirty years' experience, improved by an acquaintance with all the inventions of the Portuguese, appeared immense.
Page 52 - Canaries ; and many of the sailors, dejected already and dismayed, when they contemplated the boldness of the undertaking, began to beat their breasts, and to shed tears, as if they were never more to behold land. Columbus comforted them with the assurances of success, and the prospect of vast wealth in those opulent regions whither he was conducting them.
Page 54 - He affected to seem ignorant of their machinations. Notwithstanding the agitation and solicitude of his own mind, he appeared with a cheerful countenance, like a man satisfied with the progress which he had made, and confident of success.

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