Ballads & Legends of Cheshire

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Longmans & Company, 1867 - Ballads, English - 314 pages
 

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Page 79 - Dee." They rowed her in across the rolling foam, The cruel crawling foam, The cruel hungry foam, To her grave beside the sea: But still the boatmen hear her call the cattle home Across the sands of Dee.
Page 78 - The western wind was wild and dank with foam, And all alone went she. The western tide crept up along the sand, And o'er and o'er the sand, And round and round the sand, As far as eye could see. The rolling mist came down and hid the land: And never home came she.
Page 78 - MARY ! go and call the cattle home, — And call the cattle home, And call the cattle home Across the sands of Dee ! " The Western wind was wild and dank with foam, And all alone went she.
Page 12 - Here comes all that breeds the strife ; I in England have already A sweet woman to my wife : I will not falsify my vow for gold nor gain, Nor yet for all the fairest dames that live in Spain.
Page 13 - All my jewels in like sort take thou with thee, For they are fitting for thy wife, but not for me. ' I will spend my days in prayer, Love and all her laws...
Page 11 - Spaniards fraught with jealousy we often find, But Englishmen through all the world are counted kind. "Leave me not unto a Spaniard, You alone enjoy my heart ; I am lovely, young, and tender, Love is likewise my desert : Still to serve thee day and night my mind is prest, The wife of every Englishman is counted blest." " It would be a shame, fair lady, For to bear a woman hence ; English soldiers never carry Any such without offence.
Page 9 - Garments gay as rich as may be, Decked with jewels, she had on. Of a comely countenance and grace was she, And by birth and parentage of high degree.
Page 9 - Of a comely countenance and grace was she, And by birth and parentage of high degree. As his prisoner there he kept her, In his hands her life did lie; Cupid's bands did tie them faster By the liking of an eye.
Page 172 - Dutton kills ; a Done doth kill a Done ; A Booth a Booth ; and Leigh by Leigh is overthrown : A Venables against a Venables doth stand, And Troutbeck fighteth with a Troutbeck hand to hand ; There Molineux doth make a Molineux to die ; And Egerton the strength of Egerton doth try.
Page 13 - And these bracelets for a token, Grieving that I was so bold : All my jewels in like sort take thou with thee, For they are fitting for thy wife, and not for me.

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