Fables

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J. and R. Ronson and J. Watts, 1737 - Fables, English - 194 pages

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Page 111 - He rais'd his head with whining moan, And thus was heard the feeble tone : ' Ah ! sons ! from evil ways depart ; My crimes lie heavy on my heart. See, see the murder'd geese appear ! Why are those bleeding turkeys there ? Why all around this cackling train, Who haunt my ears for chicken slain?
Page 192 - She next the stately Bull implored, And thus replied the mighty lord: " Since every beast alive can tell That I sincerely wish you well, I may, without offence, pretend To take the freedom of a friend. Love calls me hence : a...
Page 104 - I must bid the world adieu, Let me my former life review. I grant my bargains well were made; But all men overreach in trade ; 'Tis self-defence in each profession ; Sure self-defence is no transgression.
Page 141 - I'll read my fable. Betwixt her swagging panniers load A farmer's wife to market rode, And, jogging on, with thoughtful care Summ'd up the profits of her ware ; When, starting from her silver dream, Thus far and wide was heard her scream : That raven on yon left-hand oak (Curse on his ill-betiding croak !) Bodes me no good.
Page 191 - Friendship, like love, is but a name, Unless to one you stint the flame. The child, whom many fathers share, Hath seldom known a father's care. Tis thus in friendships; who depend On many, rarely find a friend.
Page 191 - And from the deep-mouthed thunder flies. She starts, she stops, she pants for breath ; She hears the near advance of death ; She doubles, to mislead the hound, And measures back her mazy round ; Till, fainting in the public way, Half dead with fear she gasping lay. What transport in her bosom grew, When first the horse appeared in view ! " Let me," says she, " your back ascend, And owe my safety to a friend.
Page 30 - A giddy Wasp around her flies: He now advances, now retires, Now to her neck and cheek aspires. Her fan in vain defends her charms; Swift he returns, again alarms; For by repulse he bolder grew, Perch'd on her lip, and sipt the dew.
Page 164 - Tis conquest to assert your right. How cumbrous is the gilded coach ! The pride of man is our reproach. Were we...
Page 187 - Or crawls beside the coral grove, And hears the ocean roll above ; "Nature is too profuse...

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