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ECLIPSES, 1894. Astronomical calculations made expressly for The Tribune Almanac by Berlin H.

Wright, Penn Yan, N. Y. There will be four eclipses this year-two of the sun and two of the moon; and 2 transit of the planet Mercury across the sun's disk, as follows:

1. A partial eclipse of the moon of about three digits and on the southern limb, March 21; visible in the United States west of the 100th meridian, where the moon will set more or less eclipsed. On the coast from San Francisco northward the middle or greatest eclipse occurs at setting of the moon, at sunrise.

Annagrance At middla al

CORREOTIONS FOR RECENT CHANGES.

The following changes have been made since the early pages were put in type:
Robert Adams, fr. (Rep.), elected to succeed the late Charles O'Neill, in the LIIIA
Congress, from Philadelphia. (See page 85.)
Thomas S. Martin (Dem.), elected v. s. Senator from Virginia, to succeed Eppa
Hunton, whose term expires in 1895.

Vietor C, Barrington and Ernest R. Crosby, of International Tribunal of Egypt (see page 94), have resigned, to take effect February 1.

Charles Parlange, of New Orleans, succeeds the late Edward C. Billings as U. S. District Judge for the Eastern District of Louisiana. (See page 85.)

William H. Braley has been appointed to succeed Charles H. Simonton as U. S. Dis-
trict Judge for South Carolina. (See page 95.)
Charles H. Simonton appointed U. S. Circuit Judge of Fourth District. (See page 94.)
Wayne MacVeagh succeeds William Porter as Ambassador to Italy. (See page 96.)
Charles D. Fuller and James H. Forney succeed Lewis Miles and Fremont Wood as
U.S. District Attorneys for the Southern District of Iowa and for Idaho, respectively.
(See page 96.)

Charles W. Dabney, fr., of Tennessee, succeeds Edwin Willits as Assistant Secretary
of Department of Agriculture. (See page 93.)
Alfred D. Jones, Consul-General at Shanghai, died at sea December 9, and H. G.
Knowles succeeds John M. Wiley as Consul at Bordeaux. (See page 121.)

On December 27, the New-York State Board of Canvassers reconvened, and declared the Democratie candidates for delegates to the Constitutional Convention elected to represent the Sixth Senate District.

11 IV. A total eclipse of the sun, September 29, at new moon, invisible in America and Europe; visible in eastern and southern Africa, in India, and Australia. The total phase is visible in the Indian Ocean, and near the equator in Africa, east of longitude 28 deg., 44 min. E. of Greenwich. The partial phase begins first on the

and

Telegraph Company,

New York, has established public telephone stations throughout the city. They are distinguished by the sign of the "Blue Bell." From them connection may be had with

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ECLIPSES, 1894. Astronomical calculations made expressly for The Tribune Almanac by Berlin H*

Wright, Penn Yan, N. Y. There will be four eclipses this year-two of the sun and two of the moon; and 2 transit of the planet Mercury across the sun's disk, as follows:

1. A partial eclipse of the moon of about three digits and on the southern limb, March 21; visible in the United States west of the 100th meridian, where the moon will set more or less eclipsed. On the coast from San Francisco northward the middle or greatest eclipse occurs at setting of the moon, at sunrise. Lunar eclipse, March 21.

Pac. Time.

Appearance at middle of

eclipse.

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This eclipse returns April 1, 1912, when it will be only one-half the size of this one, ani will be visible in Europe. It will go off in a mere ap pulse April 12, 1930.

II. An annular eclipse of the sun April 5; invisible in America, except in Alaska. Visible in the regions each side of the Red Sea, and throughout Asia. The central ind annular path of the eclipse passes across India and through western China to Alaska, where it leaves the earth at sunrise in lat. 32 deg., 47 min., 30 sec. N., and long: 157 deg., 30 min., 42 sec. W. of Greenwich at 6:53 p. m.

This eclipse returns April 17, 1912, when it will be total, and visible in Europe.
III. A partial eclipse of the moon on the evening of September 14 and morning

the 15th. Visible throughout North America; size when greatest, 2.77 digits upon the northern limb, as shown in the figure. This eclipse will return on Sep*mber 26, 1912, when it will be smaller, and partially visible in the United States. Lunar Eclise in Mean

Boston,
New Washing.

San
Local Time.

Yrk.

| Chicago. ton.

Francisco. Moon enters penumbra or light shadow..

9:15 p. m. 9:03 p. m. 8:51 p. m. 8:09 p. m. 5:49 p. m. Moon enters umbra or

dark shadow......... 10:52 p. m. (10:40 p. m. 10:28 p. m. 9:46 p. m. 7:26 p. m. Middle or greatest eclipse. 11:48 p. m. 11:36 p. m. 11:24 p. m. 10:42 p. m. 8:22 p. m. Moon leaves umbra ark shadow.

0:44 a. m.*(0:32 a. m.*10:20 a. m.*(11:38 p. m.! 9:18 p. m. Moon leaves penumbra or light shadow.

2:20 a. m.* 2:08 a. m.* 1:56 a. m.* 1:14 a. m.* 10:54 p. m. Of the 15th.

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Begins. 14 11:36 p.m. 10:36 p.m.) 9:36 p.m.) 8:36 p.m. 7:36 p.m.

Middle. '14*0:32 a.m. 11:32 p.m. 10:32 p.m. 9:32 p.m.) 8:32 p.m.

Ends... 14*1:28 a.m.)*0:28 a.m. 11:28 p.m. (10:28 p.m. 9:28 p.m.

IV. A total eclipse of the sun, September 29, at new moon, invisible in America and Europe; visible in eastern and southern Africa, in India, and Australla. The

east of i total phase is visible in the Indian Ocean, and near the equator in Africa,

the longitude 26 deg., 44 min. E. of Greenwich. The partial phase begins first on

earth, at the mouth of the Red Sea at sunrise there, ar.d ends at sunset, from the earth' in latitude 46 deg., 24 min. s., directly south of Van Dieman's Land. It returns. again October 10, 1912, visible in South America. V. A transit of the planet Mercury across the sun's cisk, November 10. Visible throughout. the United States. The planet will enter upon the sun's disk on the east side; and pass upward and across the same.

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Times of Transit.

Inter(Standard Time.)

Colonial

Tastorn. | Central Mountain. Pacific First contact of limbs..... 11:55:32 M 10:55:32

M 9:55:32

M 8:55:32 M 7:55:32 M First interior contact. 11:57:16 M10:57:16 M 9:57:16 M 8:57:16 M 7:57:16 M Least distance of centres.. 2:33:48 E 1:33:48 E 0:33:48 E 11:33:48 M10:33:48 M Last interior contact... 5:10:26 E 4:10:26 E 3:10:26 E 2:10:26 E 1:10:26 E Last contact of limbs...... 5:12:10 E 4:12:10 E 3:12:10 Ef 2:12:10 El 1:12:10 E

PLANETS BRIGHTEST OR BEST SEEN. MERCURY,* February 21 and October 15, setting after the sun as evening star, MERCURY, April 13 and August 19, rising before the sun as morning star. VENUS, January 10, setting after the sun as evening star. VENUS, March 22, rising before the sun as morning star, MARS, October 20, rising at sunset as evening star. JUPITER, December 22, rising at sunset as evening star. SATURN, April 11, rising at sunset as evening star. URANUS, May 3, rising at sunset as evening star. NEPTUNE, December 6, rising at sunset as evening stir.

*NOTE.-Mercury will be theoretically brightest at several other times, but the dates here given are the only favorable ones for observation, Look for him just above the sunrise or sunset point when dark enough to see the stars; he appears quite red and brighter than any other star, except Sirius.

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PHASES OF VENUS FOR 1894. Venus passes through all the phases of the moon. From her greatest eastern elongation to inferior conjunction she will an ear as a crescent, with cusps pointing eastward. Her apparent diameter will be largest when at near inferior conJunction, being at that time much nearer to the earth than at any other. She will appear brightest at a point between greatest eastern elongation an inferior conjunction when only one-fifth of her illuminated hemisphere is visible to us, and, as will be seen by the figure, she is also smaller; but the proportion between her apparent size and area of visible Illuminated surface is such as to give the greatest amount of light, or is brightest. On February 16 she will be at inferior conjunction, or between the earth and sun, anl will have the largest apparent diameter, but the overpowering light of the sun will prevent seeing her for

very few

a

days before and after that date. When last seen she will show but a silvery crescent of light, and when she reappears as a morning star on the other side of the sun she will pass through the same phase, only the sharp cusps will point westwari. Her distance from us will gradually increase, and at the same time her angular distance from the sun will increase until, when she reaches her point of greatest distance west of the sun, on April 27. she will be greatly reduce 1

in apparent size, and exactly one-half of her illuminated hemisphere will be visible to us and will present a half-moon phase. After April 27 she will continue to decrease in apparent size and present a gibbous phase until about the first of October, when she will become quite stationary in size, and nearly round, being in that portion of her orbit where her distance from us varies but slightly for nearly two months. She also is close to superior conjunction November 30, when she becomes invisible; in fact, she is lost sight of long before that date, being so dim and near the sun. She will just begin to be seen again on the east of the sun as a dim evening star at the close of the year. MORNING STARS.

EVENING STARS. MERCURY, see "Planets Brightest." MERCURY, see "Planets Brightest." VENUS, from February 16 to November VENUS, until February 16 and after No30.

vember 30. MARS. until June 27.

MARS, after June 27. JUPITER, from June 4 to September 1. JUPITER, until June 4, and after SepSATURN, until January 19, and after tember 1. October 21.

SATURN, from January 19 to October 21. NOTE.-Uranus is only barely visible to the naked eye when brightest and in the absence of the moon, and the outermost member of our solar system. Neptune can only be seen with the largest telescopes, and under the favorable circumstances just mentione: Hence both are omitted here. (See "Planets Brightest.")

EPHEMERIS OF THE PRINCIPAL PLANETS, 1894.

(For the Northern and Southern States.)
VENUS.

MARS.

JUPITER. SATURN.

Day.

Passage.
Meridian

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Orioans.

New.

Orleans.

New

Passage.
Meridian

New.

Orleans.

New York

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Month.

Orleans.

Mo.

January.
January
January
February.
February
February
March.
March.
March.
April
April.
April.
May.
May
May
June.
June.
June.
Joly
July
July
August.
August..
August.
September
September
September
October..
October
October
November
November
November
December
December..
December

Sets Sets
Rises Rises
Sets Sets

Rises Rises
Eve. Ere. Eve Mo.
Mo. Eve. Mo, Mo. Mo. Mo.

Mo. 1) 3:05) 9:191 8:38 9:08 4:21] 3:52 8:31] 3:37) 3:18] 6:49 1:141 1:03 111 2:481 8:15 8:20 8:58 4:15| 3:45 7:51 2:57) 2:386:12 0:37) 0:24 21) 2:19] 7:57) 8:09.8:47 4:10 3:36 7:12 2:181 1:59( 5:33Eve. Eve. 1/ 1:301 7:161 7:241 8:361 4:03 3:28

6:30) 1:37| 1:27 4:51 11:12 10:39 11 0:32) 6:19 6:27] 8:27] 3:55 3:20 5:54 1:02 0:41 4:11 10:32 10:19 211 Mo. Ris. ( Ris. 8:18 3:48 3:12 5:19 0:27| 0:06 3:36 9:52 9:39

1 10:45) Mo. Mo. 8:11 3:39 3:04 4:52 Eve. Eve. 2:58 9:18 9:03 11 10:04 4:34 4:19 8:02 3:281 2:54 4:19 11:26 11:04 2:17| 8:36 8:25 21) 9:38 4:10 3:57 7:53 3:14 2:42 3:46 10:53 10:33 1:361 7:54) 7:43

1 9:21 3:52 3:39 7:42 2:58 2:27 3:11 10:22 9:59 0:50 7:07 6:57 111 9:12 3:39 3:26 7:32 2:41 2:13 2:401 9:53 9:29 0:07 6:24 6:14 21 9:07 3:26 3:17] 7:22 2:24 1:59

2:09 9:23 8:59 Eve. Sets Sets 19:05 3:14 3:08 7:101 2:04 1:43 1:39 8:55) 8:30 11:39| Mo. Mo. 11 9:04 3:00 2:58 6:58 1:44 1:25 1:091 8:261 8:00 9:57 3:441 3:53 21) 9:05) 2:51 2:53) 6:46 1:24) 1:07 0:401 7:591 7:33 9:16 3:03 3:11

1 9:07 2:32 2:46 6:31 0:59 0:46 0:07 Ris. Ris. 8:31) 2:18) 2:26 11 9:11 2:28 2:43 6:17 0:36 0:27 Mo. Mo. Mo. 7:51| 1:39 1:47 21 9:16 2:20 2:38 6:02 0:13| Eve. 11:08 3:44) 4:13 7:11 0:59 1:07 19:23 2:14 2:37 5:44 Eve. 11:44 10:39 3:15 3:44 6:32 0:19 0:27 11 9:33 2:16 2:41| 5:27 11:21|11:21 10:09 2:44| 3:14 5:55 Eve. Eve. 21) 9:44 2:22 2:49 5:08 10:55 10:58 9:39 2:13 2:42 5:17|10:59111:09

1 9:57) 2:33 3:02 4:48/10:26 10:31 9:06' 1:401 2:09| 4:36|10:17 10:26 11 10:09 2:49 3:15| 4:23 10:00 10:06 8:31] 1:08 1:371 3:59 9:39] 9:49 21 10:21) 3:09 3:33 4:00 9:30 9:38] 8:03 0:37| 1:061 3:23 9:02 9:12

1 10:33 3:33 3:51 3:28 8:50 9:02 7:27| Eve. Eve. I 2:431 8:20 8:31 11

3:561 4:10 2:54 8:16 8:26 6:54 11:24 11:57 2:08 7:44 7:55 21 10:491 4:19 4:28! 2:14 7:361 7:46 6:19 10:50:11:19 1:32 7:071 7:19

1/10:56 4:42 4:45) 1:29 6:56) 7:64 5:44 10:14 10:43 0:57| 6:30 6:43 11 11:03 5:06 5:04 0:391 6:03 6:11 5:07 9:37 10:06 0:23 5:54 6:07 21|11:09) 5:301 5:20 Eve.l Sets Sets 4:29 8:59 9:28 Mo. Ris. Ris.

1 11:17) 5:461 5:39 10:451 Mo. Mo. l 3:45 8:15 8:44 11:09 Mo. Mo. 11 11:27) 6:221 6:04 9:57] 4:291 4:21 3:04 7:34 8:03[10:35 5:08 4:54 21/11:38 Sets. (Sets. 1 9:151 3:47] 3:39 2:29 6:51 7:20 10:00 4:35| 4:20

1 11:51 Eve. Eve. 1 8:38 3:11) 3:03 1:35 6:08 6:37) 9:25 4:011 3:45 11 E.:05 4.37 5:12 8:05 2:46 2:46 0:54 5:23 5:52! 8:49 3:261 3:10 21) 0:21 4:51) 5:27 7:36| 2:161 2:05 0:08 4:38 5:07| 8:13 2:521 2:35

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