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For generations horseshoes have been of one pattern and of one material, and many valuable animals are injured every year by the use of shoes of the ordinary character and by the barbarous method still employed for fixing them. The "HUMANE HORSE. SHOE” is designed upon entirely new principles, and possesses such advantages that experienced men have given it their entire approval. It suits all climates and all horses. Among its most obvious advantages the following may be enumerated:

1st-It is lighter and more durable than any ordinary shoe, being made of the best softened steel instead of ordinary iron. None but the best metal will stand the process of manufacture.

24-It can be fitted with ease to any peculiarity of foot without heating.

3d-It is fixed without nails on a system which cannot possibly injure the horse or interfere with the natural growth of the hoof, and, though easily removable, is as firm as it could be made by any nails.

4th-It is moderate in price, and from its durability really cheaper than an ordinary shoe.

5th-It may be rubber padded on a system which obviates any "jar" to the leg on the hardest roads, and gives a safe footing on the most slippery surface, whether of asphalt, frost or ice. No sharpening is required.

6th-It can be fixed by a groom if a smith is not at hand.

7th-It is made solid for agricultural work and for use on country roads. It has been most favorably spoken of by the veterinary profession and the press; the newspapers stating that this invention will "revolutionize the shoeing of horses."

Sets mailed to any address on receipt of postal order for $3.00.
Offices, HUMANE HORSESHOE CO.,

54 World Building, New-York.

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&

SMITH, Brush Manufacturers,

251 PEARL STREET,

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“Washington's Farewell

to His Officers."

A beautiful and patriotic picture, in colors, 14 by 18 inches, of a famous scene of the American Revolution, painted expressly for The Tribune by the artist Ogden, a great authority. Portraits of Washington, Knox, Putnam, Steuben, Clinton and others. This picture is historically correct; the uniforms are exact to a button. Obtainable only from The Tribune or its Club Agents. Price, 50 cents. Sent, postage paid, with The Weekly, one year, for $1 20. With the Semi-Weekly, $2 10. Free, for one new subscriber at $1. The Tribune's Illustrated Premium List sent free on application.

THE TRIBUNE, New-York.

MANUFACTURERS

JOSEPH B. DALEY & Co., Printers' Rollers, Excelsior and 0. K. Roller Composition. NO. 31 ROSE STREET,

Established 1863.

NEW YORK. Composition Made Especially for Export.

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20 OLLEGE PL

NEW YORK Superior
DESIGNS FOR

U work
ALL ILLUSTRATIVE Guaranteed
PURPOSES

ESTABLISHED 1869. AMERICAN WHITE METAL WORKS,

G. D. MACKEY, PROPRIETOR.

MANUFACTURER OF

STEREOTYPE, ELECTROTYPE, AND TYPE METAL,

“OUR

Anti-Friction Metal, Solder, White Brass, Etc.,
COPPER
AND ZINC PLATES FOR ELECTROTYPING.

-1-1-1-1-
Office : 64 GOLD STREET, NEW YORK.

CHAUNCEY." A brilliant, rollicking poem, by Isaac H. Bromley, the humorous editorial writer of The Tribune, handsomely and ingeniously illustrated by Dan Beard and C. D. Gibson, two great magazine artists. These forty odd pages contain as much illustra. tions as poems. Fine paper covers, illustrated. "Our Chauncey is Chauncey M. Depew, the most sparkling and delightful of American orators, whom, as a baby in his cradle, Mercury, the messenger of Jupiter, finds at Peekskill, N. Y., and whom Jupiter brings up to put to flight the old fogies who talk stupid commonplace at public banquets.

The story of "Our Chauncey” is delightfully told. The poem was read originally at a gathering of graduates of Yale College. They laughed just once during the reading, but the laugh began with the third line, and never stopped until the close.

Price, 50 cents. Postage paid, with The Weekly, one year, $i 30; with The SemiWeekly, $2 20. Free, for one new subscriber at $1. The Tribune's Illastrated Premium List sent free on application.

THE TRIBUNE, New-York.

ME PRINTERS. Illustrated Catalogues, Periodicals, ,

GENERAL JOBBING.

17 to 27 Vandewater Street, New-York.

SAMUEL WEIL,

MANUFACTURER OF
PATENT MACHINE-MADE

PASTE and SIZING.

PASTE MADE FOR ALL SPECIAL PURPOSES.

194 AND 196 FRANKLIN ST., Call Cortlandt 4722.

NEW-YORK.

New-York Tribune Extras. .

AMERICA'S CUP RACES.—The eight races previous to 1893. Illustrated; 46 large pages, 25 cents.

ART AND ARCHITECTURE AT THE WORLD'S FAIR.--A critical guide book, by The Tribune's Art Critic. Only one in existence. 58 large pages. 25 cents.

PRIZE WAR STORIES.-Over forty tales, by Union soldiers ; inspiring, thrilling and pathetic. 88 pages. 25 cents.

TRUE WAR STORIES.-A later collection of exciting Tribune War Stories. 88 pages. 25 cents.

MILLIONAIRES.-Only list of the 4,047 "millionaires" of the United States ever compiled. How they made their money. Prepared by The Tribune. 93 large pages. 25 cents.

FREE SILVER.--The Joint Debate between Senator Stewart, of Nevada, and Roswell G. Horr; republished. Both sides ably stated. 78 pages. 25 cents.

BIG ISSUES.- The best of Roswell G. Horr's articles on the Tariff, Finance and Silver; republished. 88 large pages. 25 cents.

KNITTING AND CROCHET.-Patterns for garments, tidies, mats, chair covers, etc. Six different pamphlets; each 64 or more pages. Each 10 cents; the six for 50 ! cents. M'KINLEY INDUSTRIES.-How wages and enterprise boomed in 1892.

96 pages. 10 cents.

VILLAGE IMPROVEMENT.-Two charming articles, by B. G. Northrop. 5 cents.

TRUSTS.-An argument between S. C. T. Dodd and Terence V. Powderly. 5 cents.

HOW TO WIN FORTUNE.-A celebrated essay, by Andrew Carnegie. 5 cents.
LECTURES TO YOUNG MEN.-On wealth, health and political duty. 10 cents.
PRACTICAL COOKERY.--By Maria Parloa. 10 cents.
SUNDAY DINNERS.-Thirty-five menus, with recipes. 10 cents.
SUMMER LEISURE.-Love stories. 100 pages. 10 cents.

THE TRIBUNE, New-York.

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THE COMMUNIPAU COAL COMPANY.

YARD: COMMONIPAU, JERSEY CITY. Yard: 617 to 621 Eleventh Ave., bet, 45th (& 46th Sts., New-York, NEW-YORK OFFICES:

$111 Broadway, Room 40.

621 Eleventh Avenue,

POSTOFFICE BOX 2209. TELEPHONE CALLS: Uptown, 656 3Sth Street; Downtown, 175 Cortlandt.

Our yards are kept supplied with carefully selected Coal shipped direct from the mines of the Lehigh and Wilkes-Barre Coal Company via Cntral Railroad New-Jersey.

THE NEW-YORK TRIBUNE

For Fifty Years the Leading Defender and Ex

pounder of Republican Doctrine.

Stand by the platform! Victory in 1894 and 1896 is now sure if the Republican party is true to itself and the welfare of the masses.

No interference with the progressive policies of the Republican party, namely, which are: Maintenance of the Common Schools, of the Pulpit; Protection to Farming, Manufactures and Labor; Freedom of Expression of the Will of the People in Elections; Saving the Public Lands for Actual Settlers; Reciprocity with Other American Nations: Use of Silver Money, and Parity of the Gold and silver Dollar; Payment of the Public Debt; Pensions for Union Veterans: Elevation of the Colored Race; Temperance: the new Navy: Exclusion of the Chinese; Internal Improvements: and every other influence which exalts the prestige of our country and promotes the Wealth, Intelligence and Virtue of our people.

These policies-national, patriotic and sublime-The Tribune supports with all the ability it can command.

Roswell G. Horr's great articles on Finance, the Tariff, Labor and Wages, will be continued during 1894.

No matter whether you agree with the N. Y. Tribune or not in its sentiments, can you afford not to read its Dollar Weekly regularly while a reactionary party is in power and during these times of change? Send for The Tribune's Illustrated Premium Catalogue, which will be sent free to applicants.

Sample copies free. Weekly, $1. Semi-Weekly, $2. Daily, including Sunday, $10. The Sunday Tribune, separately. $2. Tribune Almanac for1894, ready in January, 25 cents; all previous numbers eclipsed.

THE TRIBUNE, New-York.

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