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TW Deve/TPimpoldseis

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NEW YORK
ESTABLISHED. 1755
Manufacturers of

Correspondence invited
Catalogues of our various departments

to responsible parties

Offices
Fulton St. Cor.)

William
AND
CHICAGO

ARTISTS MATERIALS
HOUSE TAINTERS

COLORS
FINE VARNISHES

.

176 BANDOLPH ST.

2400

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15 JOHN STREET, NEW YORK,
For nearly a Century the Leading Seed House of America.

We will mail free on application our Catalogue of

*High Class Seeds,

(Published on the 1st day of January of each year,) ONTAINING the largest collection in the world, with

illustrations, descriptions, and full directions for culture. Fall Bulb Catalogue, published in September, free on application.

FOR

1896.

HENRY ECKFORD RHOADES, Editor.

MOON
E

ECLIPSES, 1896. (Astronomical calculations made expressly for The Tribune Almanac by Berlin H.

Wright, Penn Yan, N. Y. There will be four eclipses this year-two each of the sun and moon: I. An annular eclipse of the sun February 13, invisible in the United States. A partial eclipse will be visible in South Africa, at Cape of Good Hope, quite large, and in Brazil, very small. This eclipse returns again February 19, 1914, and in the Antarc. tic Circle. II. A partial eclipse of the moon February 28, invisible in America.

In Europe, Asia and Africa, it will be seen, of 10 digits in size. It returns again March 10, 1914, and will be larger, and visible in North and South America.

III. A total eclipse of the sun, August 8 and 9, invisible in America; visible in Europe and Asia, the total phase being seen in Siberia and Yezo. This returns again August 21, 1914, central in British

N America, Norway, Russia, India.

IV. A partial eclipse of the moon August
22 and 23; visible in America generally.
Size 8.8 digits on the southern limb. This
returns September 4, 1914, larger and visi-
ble in Asia.
APPEARANCE OF LUNAR ECLIPSE

OF AUGUST 22-23.
The direction of the moon easterly

EARTH5 through the shadow is shown by the

SHADOW

1 arrow. The north point of the moon's limb is at N N, the first contact is at E in No. 1, 101 degrees east of N, and the last contact at w in No. 5, 153 degrees west of N. The first six digits occur at No. 2, the last six in No. 4, and when largest, nearly three-quarters of the moon, in NO. 3. Lunar Eclipse,

Inter

Eastern.
August 22 23.

colonial.

Central. | Mount'n. Pacific.
H. M. | H. M.

H. M.
H. M.

H. M. Eclipse begins..

22 *1:24 Mo.) *0:24 Mo. 11:24 Ev. 10:24 Ev. 9:24 Ev. Eclipse largest.

22) *2:57 Mo. *1:57 Mo. *0:57 Mo. 11:57 Ev. 10:57 Ev. Eclipse ends.

23 4:30 Mo. 3:30 Mo. 2:30 Mo. 1:30 Mo. 0:30 Mo.

*August 23. TO FIND THE TIME OF GREATEST ELONGATION OF POLARIS.

TABLE I. By adding the numbers in the annexed table for any given latitude to the time of meridian passage of Polaris (the Pole Star), in Table III, the time of its greatest western elongation is found. If the same number be subtracted instead of added, we get the time of greatest eastern elongation. At the time of either elon

gation the magnetic bearing Lati. Constant

Lati.
Constant

Constant
Lati.

may be taken with the
for
for

for tude tude

tude

transit compass, using that North, ElongaNorth, Elonga

Elonga- elongation which occurs at

North.
tion,
tion.

tion.

night. The eastern elonga

tions occur at night from H.M.S. H. M. S.

H, M. S. 29 00 5:56:14 34 30 5:55:34

April 1 to October 11, and 40 00 5:54:48

the western elongations oc29 30 5:56:11 35 00 5:55:30 40 30 5:54:44 30 00 5:56:07 30 5:55:26 41 00 5:54:39

cur at night all the rest of 30 30 5:56:03 00 5:55:22 41 30 5:54:35

the year. Correct local time 31 00 5:56:00 36 30 5:55:18 42 00 5:54:30

is to be used, and bearings 31 30 5:55:56 37 00

on the star taken promptly

5:55:14 42 30 5:54:25 32 00 5:55:53

on 37 30 5:55:10

time; but an 43 00 5:54:20

error of 32 30

half a minute or even a 5:55:50 38 00 5:55:06 43 30 5:54:15

minute in the 83 00

timepiece 5:55:46 38 30 5:55:02

44 00 5:54:10

will not invalidate 33 30

the 5:55:42 39 00 5:54:57 44 30 5:54:05 34 00

bearing, as Polaris moves 5:55:38 39 30 5:54:53 45 00 5:54:00

then nearly vertically.

Day

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TABLE II.

MEAN TIME OF SIDEREAL NOON, OR MERIDIAN

PASSAGE OF THE VERNAL EQUINOX AT WASHINGTON, D. C.,

FOR 1896.

(For other places, add 9.83 seconds for each hour of longitude east of Washington, and subtract 9.83 seconds for each hour of

longitude west of Washington.)

9
10
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.
19

20.

21
22
23.
24.

27

29

31

TABLE III.

TIMES OF UPPER MERIDIAN PASSAGE OF POLARIS, OR NORTH STAR, 1896. Surveyors and civil engineers may obtain the variation of the magnetic needle for any place in the United States by directing their compass to the North Star (Polaris) when it is upon the meridian, as given in the table below, for the upper culmination: or 11 hours 58 minutes 2 seconds, before or after, when the star is on the lower meridian. Exact local time is used in the table, and the timeplece used must be correct, and the bearing of the star taken promptly on time, and that bearing will be the true variation of the needle. An error of only a few seconds in the timepiece will vitiate the bearing found; therefore, it will be much better to take the bearing when the star is furthest east or west, at its greatest elongation, as observations made upon it then are not affected materially by small errors of timepieces. To use this table for places west of Washington, add 9.83 seconds for each hour of longitude east of Washington, and subtract 9.83 seconds for each hour west of it. From February 1 to August 1, use the lower culmination.

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June. July.

August. Sept'mb'r October. Novemb'r December
Morn. Morn. Morn. Morn. Morn. Eve. Eve.
H. M. S. H. M. S. H. M. S. H, M, S. H. M. S. H, M.S, H. M. S.
8:38:00 6:40:32 4:39:10 2:37:43 0:40:02 10:34:15 8:36:05
8:34:05 6:36:37 4:35:15 2:33:48 0:36:06 10:30:18 8:32:08
8:30:10 6:32:42 4:31:20 2:29:53 0:32:10 10:26:22 8:28:12
8:26:1516:28:47 4:27:25 2:25:58 0:28:14 10:22:26 8:24:16
8:22:20 6:24:52 4:23:30 2:22:02 0:24:19 10:18:30 8:20:19
8:18:25 6:20:58 4:19:35 2:18:07 0:20:23 10:14:34 8:16:23
8:14:30 6:17:03 4:15:40 2:14:11 0:16:27 10:10:38 8:12:26
8:10:35 6:13:08 4:11:45 2:10:16 0:12:32 10:06:42 8:08:29
8:06:40 6:09:13 4:07:50 2:06:21 0:08:36 10:02:46 8:04:
8:02:45 6:05:18 4:03:55 2:02:26 0:04:411 9:58:50 8:00:36
7:58:50 6:01:23 4:00:00 1:58:30 Even'g: 9:54:53) 7:56:39
7:54:55 5:57:28 3:56:05 1:54:35 11:52:53 9:50:57| 7:52:42
7:51:01 5:53:33 3:52:10 1:50:40 11:48:58 9:47:01 7:48:45
7:47:06 5:49:38 3:48:15 1:46:45 11:45:02 9:43:04 7:44:
7:43:10 5:45:43 3:44:20 1:42:49 11:41:06 9:39:08 7:40:52
7:39:15 5:11:48 3:40:25 1:38:54 11:37:10 9:35:

:36:56
7:35:20 5:37:54 3:36:30 1:34:58 11:33:14 9:31:15 7:32:59
7:31:25 5:33:59 3:32:35 1:31:03 11:29:18 9:27:19 7:29:02
7:27:30 5:30:04 3:28:40 1:27:08 11:28:22 9:23:22 7:25:06
7:23:36 5:26:09 3:24:45 1:23:12 11:21:26 9:19:26 7:21:09
7:19:41 5:22:14 3:20:50 1:19:16 11:17:30 9:15:30 7:17:12
7:15:46 5:18:20 3:16:55 1:15:21 11:13:55 9:11:34 7:13:15
7:11:51 5:14:25 3:13:00 1:11:25 11:09:39 9:07:37 7:09:18
7:07:56 5:10:30 3:09:04 1:07:30 11:05:43 9:03:41 7:05:21
7:04:02 5:06:35 3:05:09 1:03:35 11:01:47 8:59:44 7:01:24
7:00:07 5:02:40 3:01:14 0:59:39 10:57:51 8:55:48 6:57:28
6:56:12 4:58:45 2:57:19 0:55:44 10:53:55 8:51:51 6:53:31
6:52:17 4:54:50 2:53:24 0:51:49 10:50:00 8:47:54 6:49:34
6:48:22 4:50:55 2:49:29 0:47:53 10:46:03 8:43:58 6:45:37
6:44:27 4:47:00 2:45:33 0:43:57 10:42:07 8:40:01 6:41:41
4:43:05 2:41:38

10:38:11

6:37:44

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