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POSTAL INFORMATION. CLASSES OF MAIL MATTER. written or printed words or figures, or Domestic mail matter is divided into both, Indicating date on which subscrip tour classes:

tion ends; correction of typographical erFirst Class--Letters, postal cards, and rors, a mark except by written or printed matter wholly or partly in writing, words to designate a word or passage to whether sealed or unsealed (except manu which it is desired to call attention, the script copy accompanying proof-sheets or words "sample copy''; publishersor news corrected proof-sheets of the same), and agents' bills, receipts and orders for suball matter sealed or otherwise closed scription, but the same shall convey no against inspection. Rates of postage- other information than the name, place Two cents per ounce or fraction thereof. of publication, subscription price, and Postal cards, one cent each. On "drop" amount of subscription due. The number letters two cents per ounce or fraction of copies inclosed may be indicated on thereof, when mailed at letter-carrier's wrapper or face of package. office; and one cent per ounce or fraction Third Class-Sender's name and address, thereof at other offices.

with the word "from"; marks other than Second Class--Newspapers and publica- by written or printed words to call attentions issued at stated intervals as often tion to word or passage; correction of as four times a year, bearing a date of typographical errors; on the blank leaves issue and numbered consecutively, issued or cover of any book may be placed & from a known office of publication, and simple manuscript dedication or inscrip formed of printed sheets, without board, tion not in the nature of a personal correcloth, leather or other substantial binding, spondence; upon the address side of wrapSuch publications must be originated and per, envelope, tag or label must be left published for the dissemination of infor space sufficient for legible address and mation of a public character, or devoted necessary stamps. to literature, the sciences, art, or some

Fourth Class-With matter of this kind special industry. They must have may be inclosed any mailable third-class legitimate list of subscribers, and must matter. On wrapper, cover, tag or label not be designed primarily for advertis may be written name and address of ing purposes, for circulation free, or sender, with word "from"; marks, numat nominal rates. Rate of postage-For bers, names or letters for purposes of depublishers and news agents, one cent a scription, or same may be printed; any pound or fraction thereof. For others printed matter not in nature of a perthan publishers and news agents, one cent sonal correspondence, On address side for each four ounces or fraction thereof. must be left space sufficient for legible

Third Class - Books, periodicals and address and necessary stamps. matter wholly in print (not included in second class), proof-sheets, corrected proof

THE REGISTRY SYSTEM. sheets and manuscript copy accompany

All mail matter, including drop letters, ing the same. Rate of postage-One cent

may be registered; but not matter adfor each two ounces or fraction thereof. dressed to fictitious names, initials or box

Fourth Class --Merchandise-namely, all numbers, or bearing vague and indefinite matter not embraced in the other three

addresses. classes, and which is not in its form or The registry fee is eight cents in addinature liable to destroy, deface or other

tion to postage. It must be prepaid by wise damage the contents of the mail stamps affixed. bag, or harm the person of any one en

The rates of postage to all other coungaged in the postal service, and not

tries and colonies (except Canada and above the weight provided by law. Rate

Mexico) are as follows: of postage-One cent per ounce or frac

Letters, 15 grams (4 ounce)..... 5 cents. tion thereof, but on seeds, cuttings, roots,

Postal cards, each...

2 cents. scions and plants, one cent for each two

Newspapers and other printed matounces or fraction thereof.

ter, per 2 ounces...

1 cent. LIMIT OF WEIGHT.

Commercial papers: A package must not exceed four pounds

Packets not in excess of 10 in weight, unless it be a single book.

ounces

5 cents. Second-class matter is not subject to the

Packets in excess of 10 ounces, four-pound limitation.

for each 2 ounces or fraction PAYMENT OF POSTAGE.

thereof

1 cent. On first-class matter the postage should

Samples of merchandise:

Packets not be fully prepaid, but if two cents in

in excess stamps be affixed the matter will be for ounces

2 cents. warded and remainder due collected of

Packets in excess of 4 ounces, addressee before delivery.

for each 2 ounces or fraction On second-elass matter the postage must

thereof

1 cent, be fully prepaid when sent by others than

Registration fee on letters or other publishers or news agents.

articles

8 cents On third-class matter the postage must

Ordinary letters for countries of tnet be fully prepaid.

Postal Union (except Canada and Mexico) On fourth-class matter the postage must

must be forwarded whether any postage be fully prepaid.

is prepaid on them or not. All other WHAT MAY BE WRITTEN OR PRINT-mallable matter must be prepaid, at least.' ED ON MAIL MATTER.

partially. Second Class-Name and address of per

CANADA AND MEXICO. sons to whom the matter is to be sent; Matter mailed in the United States adindex-figures of subscription book printed dressed to Canada or Mexico is subject to or written; printed title of publication; the same postage rates and conditions as printed or written name or address, with it would be if it were addressed for de out advertisement of publisher or sender; I livery in the United States.

FOREIGN POSTAGE TABLE.-COUNTRIES NOT EMBRACED IN THE UNIVERSAL POSTAL UNION.

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Africa, except Egypt, Liberia, Congo, British, French, Spanish and Portu. Cents.
guese Colonies in the Territories of Southwest Africa, and of Togo,
Western Africa (German Protectorates), Tunis, and the Enropean post-
offices in Morocco, Abyssinia and Madagascar, British mail..

(c,d) 10
Ascension, British mail.

(c) 10
Bechuanaland, same as "Transvaal” (U. P. U.).........
*Cape Colony, South Africa, British mail

(c) 10
Chatham Islands, via San Francisco same as New Zealand (U.P. U.).....
China, British mail, via Brindisi
Comoro Isles (except Mayotte) Mozambique Channel..

(0) 5
Cook Island, same as New Zealand, Friendly (Tonga) Island, via Now.
Zealand..

10
Kimberley, South Africa (same as Cape Colony)

(c)
Madagascar (except St. Mary's, Tamatave, Majunga, Ambositra, Ande.
vorante, Fenerive. Fiaranantsoa, Foulpointe, Ivondro, Maevatanana,
Mahambo, Mahanoro, Mihela, Maintírano, Mananjary, Morondava,
Morotsangana, Nossi-ve, Iananarive or Antananarivo, Votomandry,
Vohemar), British mail.

(o, d) 10
Morocco (except
Spanish possessions on West Coast).

(0) 10
|| Navigators, or Samoan Islands.

(c) 5
Norfolk Islands, same as New South Wales (U. P. U.).
Orange Free State..
Pitcairn's Island...

(C) 5
Raratonga Islands, via New Zealand.

(c) 10 Saint Helena, British mail..

(c) 10
Savage Islands,
via New Zealand.

10
aShanghai, U.S. Postal Agency at, via San Francisco.

c) 5

Same as for “ printed matter," except that the lowest charge on any one package, whatever its weight, is 5 cents.

Same as for printed matter." except that

the lowest charge on any package, whatever its weight, is 2 cents.

4

(c) 10

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*Includes Basutoland, Caffraria and Griqualand. Except places at "Hong Kong," "France," and "French Colonies-in Asia."
Grand Comoro, Anjouan Mohelo.
11 Second-class periodical publications are transmissible to the Samoan and Pitcairn Islands at the rate of 2 cents per copy.

(a) Articles of every kind and nature which are admitted to the United States domestic mails are admitted to the mails exchanged
between the U. S. and the U. S. Postal Agency at Shanghai, subject, however to the rates of postage noted, which must be prepaid
on all articles, except official correspondence in penalty en velopes.

(c) Prepayment compulsory. (a) Additional postage may be collected on delivery.

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MONEY ORDER SYSTEM. ceed an annual production of 260,000 tons THE POSTAL MONEY ORDER SYS

of finished product, and to give employ

ment to 11,000 or 12,000 hands. Tbe TEM.

capital invested was about $8,500,000, and

the annual wages about $7,000,000. QuotThe following are the fees for domestic

ing from the circular, it says: "Less than money-orders:

four years ago no tin plates were made in For orders not exceeding $2 50....... 3c.

this country. . The tin-plate clause of For orders exceeding $2 50 and not exceeding $5.

5c,

the McKinley bill went into effect on July

1, 1891. In less than a period of four For orders exceeding $6 and not ex

8c.

years the American tin-plate industry has ceeding $10

so developed as to more than meet the reFor orders exceeding $10 and not ex

10c.

quirements of the home market. Such ceeding $20. For orders exceeding $20 and not ex

growth is unparalleled." The capacity of 12c.

a mill in operation for forty-five weeks in ceeding $30.

a year is about 30,000 boxes, or 3,300.000 For orders exceeding $30 and not ex

pounds. The capacity of the 166 mills In ceeding $40..

. 15c. For orders exceeding $40 and not ex

operation and the 58 prospective mills per ceeding $50.

.18c.

annum is 6,720,000 boxes. The consumpFor orders exceeding $50 and not ex

tion of tin plates in the United States per

annum is about 6,000,000 boxes; deducting ceeding $60.

.20c.

the supply for the Pacific Coast (dressed For orders exceeding $60 and not ex

meats and fish), and for Standard Oil ceeding $75..

.25c. For orders exceeding $75 and not ex

Company, imported plates for export on

which drawback is allowed (about 1.500.000 ceeding $100.

.30c.

boxes), makes a net market of domestic The maximum amount of a single order

plates for consumption of 4,500,000 boxes. is $100.

The tin-plate works in England and INTERNATIONAL MONEY ORDERS.

Wales have an aggregate of 519 mills, and

of this number 232 mills were idle in 1894. Postal conventions are now in opera

The following are the firms operating mills tion for the exchange of money-orders be

in the United States: tween the United States and the following countries, viz. : Switzerland, Great Britain Somers Bros., Brooklyn, N. Y..... and Ireland, Germany, France, Italy, U. S. I. and T. P. Co., Demmler, Penn. Canada, Newfoundland, Jamaica, New

Marshall Bros. & Co., Phila., Penn.... 5 South Wales, Victoria, New Zealand,

Lalance & Grosjean, Harrisburg, Penn.

2 Queensland, the Cape Colony, the Wind

Blairsville R. M. and T. P. Co., Blairsward Islands (embracing the islands of

ville, Penn... Barbadoes, Grenada, St. Vincent and St.

New-Castle S. & T. P. Co., New-CasLucia), the Leeward Islands (consisting

tle, Penn

16 of the Presidencies of Antigua, St. Chris

Elwood T. P. Co., Elwood City, Penn.
topher-Nevis, Dominica, Montserrat and
the Virgin Islands), Belgium, Portuga.

Canonsburg I. and s. Co., Pittsburg.
Penn.

3 (including the Azores and the Madeira

Monongahela T. P. Co., Pittsb'g, Penn. 9 Islands), Tasmania, the Hawaiian Repub

Pittsburg T. P. Co., New-Kensington, lic, Sweden, Japan, Norway, Denmark,

Penn. the Netherlands, the Bahama Islands, the colony of Trinidad and Tobago, Aus

Pennsylvania T. P. C., New-Kensing

ton, Penn. tria, Hungary, British Guiana, the Grand Duchy of Luxembourg, Bermuda, and the

Wallace, Banfield & Co., Irondale, Ohio colony of South Australia, Salvador and

Falcon Sheet and T. P. Co., Niles, Ohio. Hong Kong.

Aetna-Standard I. and S. Co., BridgeThe fees for International Money-Orders Britton Rolling Mill Co., Cleveland,

port, Ohio. are as follows:

Ohio For sums not exceeding $10.

...... 10c. Over $10 and not exceeding $20. .20c.

Beaver T. P. Co., New-Lisbon, Ohio,.

.30c. Over $20 and not exceeding $30.

Morton T. P. Co., Cambridge, Ohio. Over $30 and not exceeding $40. .40c.

Reeves Iron Co., Canal Dover, Ohio. Over $40 and not exceeding $50. .50c.

Laughlin & Junction, Martins Ferry.

.60c. Over $50 and not exceeding $60.

Ohio... Over $60 and not exceeding $70. 70c.

Crescent S. and s. Co., Cleveland, Ohio Over $70 and not exceeding $80. .80c.

Whitaker Iron Co., Wheeling, W. Va.. Over $80 and not exceeding $90 .90c. La Belle Iron Works, Wheeling. W. Va. Over $90 and not exceeding $100....... $1 Old Dominion I. and N. W. Co., Rich

mond, Va.....

American T. P. Co., Elwood, Ind. TIN-PLATE INDUSTRY OF THE

The Morewood Co., Gas City, Ind..

Irondale I. and S. Co., Middletown, Ind. UNITED STATES.

National T. P. Co., Anderson, Ind.

Montpelier T. P. Co., Montpelier, Ind.. The Tinned-Plate Manufacturers' Asso Atlanta T. P. Co., Atlanta, Ind.. ciation of the United States issued a cir St. Louis St'ping Co., St. Louis, Mo. cular in March, 1895, giving the number Cumberland S. and T. P. Co., Cumberof black plate (tin) mills in the United land, Md. States, their capacity, etc. It showed Baltimore I., S. and T. P. Co., Baltithat there were in this country, completed more, Md.. and in course of construction, thirty-four Great Western T. P. Co., Joliet, ni. tin-plate works, with 166 mills. The capacity of these mills was estimated to ex Total

In addition to the preceding the follow TIN-PLATE MANUFACTURES. ing firms have mills in contemplation: Blairsville R. M. and T. P. Co., Blairs

(From report of Special Treasury Agent ville, Penn...

Ira Ayer.) Monongahela T. P. Co., Pittsb'g, Penn.

Fiscal Amount in Pounds Made from Star T. P. Co., Pittsburg, Penn...

Year Ended American Foreign Pittsburg T. P. Co., New-Kensington,

June 30. Black Plate. Black Plate. Penn.

1892.
9,296,553

4,350,166 Reeves Iron Co., Canal Dover, Ohio. 3 1893.

43,599,724 56,219,478 Crescent S. and S. Co., Cleveland, Ohio. 2 1894.

85,968, 202 53,255, 265 American T. P. Co., Elwood, Ind..... 2 1895.

.160,576,934 33, 224,139 Morewood Co., Gas City, Ind..

10

PRODUCTION IN UNITED STATES IN National T. P. Co., Anderson, Ind. 2 Baltimore I. S. and T. P. Co., Balti

POUNDS. more, Md..

6 1892.

26,213,256 Stickney I. Co., Baltimore, Md.

1893.

63,681,541 Illinois Steel Co., Chicago, Ill.

18 1894.

98,970,880 Great Western T. P. Co., Joliet, Ill.... 2 1895.

.185,571,479

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STATISTICS OF FARMS, HOMES, ETC. The following table gives the results of investigation by the Census Bureau, embracing farm families and home families, in each case giving the details of farms or homes owned or hired by them; whether free of or subject to incumbrance; and

a statement of the value, incumbrance, etc.

Families

Families
Owning Farmg. Families Owning Homes. Families
States and Territories.

No. Incum.

Hiring
No.

Hiring

Incum-
Free.

Farms.
bered.

Free.

Homes.

bered. Alabama. 68,798 3,131 94,761 26,7661

826

93,010 Arizona

1,716

126
457 4,796

222

6,178 Arkansas.

75,961 3,314 67,695 20,616 1,280 44,754 California

28,520 13,732 13,282 58,498 17,175 114,503 Colorado.

11,488 3,929

3,761 20,277 5,955 38,866 Connecticut.

14,996 6,769

4,674

25, 461 21,749 92,241 Delaware..

3,350 1,395 4,636 5,143 3,245 16,809 District of Columbia.

232

10

145 8,346 2,637 32,597 Florida..

23,163 703 12,759 15,517 752 27,165 Georgia.

71,116 2,491 102,081 36,001 1,031 139, 339 Idaho.

5,927 1,156 914 5,587 3281 4,201 Mlinois.

101,305 58,760 92,888 158,819 67,490 298,753 Indiana.

97, 196 48,079 60,056 91,675 31,774 138,366 [owa.

67,587 77,111 60, 737 73,802 26,961 82,319 Kansas. 52,548 65, 483 53,114 38,509 24, 788

62,916 Kentucky

118,080 4,991 65,489 49,519 3, 606 112,778 Louisiana.

34,038 1,420 44, 247 26,773 1,072 106,573 Maine...

44, 712 12, 679 4,731 33,328 9,042 45,863 Maryland. 18, 175 7,794 15,403 38, 115

13,133 109,559 Massachusetts.

20,425 8,945 5, 206 88,379 57,304 299,531 Michigan.

74,302 72,395 30,067 95, 173 45, 312 137,755 Minnesota.

53,564 46,347 17,982 39,082 22,038 68,962 Mississippi.

56,096 4,681 100, 303 17,067 766 62,235 Missouri.

109,946 63,011 77,875 72,526 28,094 176,843 Montana.

4,709 869

863 8,067 1,136 11,857 Nebraska.

40,629 43,991 21,308 25,442 14,467 50,983 Nevada.

1,052 218

244 4,663 191 3,802 New Hampshire.

20,310 5,659 3,182 17,071 5,782 35,344 New-Jersey.

11,080 10,607 10, 255 48,468 39,786 188, 143 New-Mexico.

8,142

251 1,125 15,824 470 9,692 New-York.

97,509 77,143 51,980 192,516 124, 115 764,752 North Carolina.

101,321 5,202 76,268 30,4255 1,567 92,169 North Dakota.

13,054 12,377 2,794 3,360 1,285 5,608 Ohio...

132,540 53,883 69,841 170, 403 69,540 289, 084 Oklahoma.

9,903
516 3,156

1,454 Oregon

17,246 5,257 5,136 12,154 4,735 19, 263 Pennsylvania

113,908 43,020 54,544 211, 996 93,575 544,583 Rhode Island.

3,339 786 1,375 11,297 6,797 51,416 South Carolina.

41,601 3,617 72,187 17,707 1,216 86,613 South Dakota.

19,771 21,750 8,019 7,178 4,187 9,345 Tennessee.

103,346 3,431 76,949 41,214 2,389 106,865 Texas.

119,093 7,221 122,468 60,879 2,713 98,877 Utah..

10,166 597 1,121 14,943 1,390 10,599 Vermont.

14,935

11,900 5,738 12,464 7,285 23,547 Virginia.

79,660

2,596

50,534 45,939 1,947 123,997 Washington.

14,369

4,427

15,119 3,782 28,029 West Virginia.

48,7631

20,122 18,915 4,419 40,868 Wisconsin..

73, 671

19,436
71,927

30,134 85,046 Wyoming

2,431

738

2,836 445 5,256

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STATISTICS OF FARMS, HOMES, ETC.-Continued. There are 420 cities and towns that have a population of 8,000 to 100,000, and in these cities 64.04 per cent of the home families hire, and 35.96 per cent own their homes, and of the home-owning families 34.11 per cent own with incumbrance, and 65.89 per cent own free of incumbrance. The following are the number and per centage of families occupying owned and hired homes in 28 cities having a population of 100,000 and over: Families

Families
Owning. Fami.

Owning.

Farm Cities.

lieg
Incum-

Cities.
Freo.

Free.

Incum-
Hiring
bered.

bered.

Hiring Allegheny 3,563 2,0251 15, 189 Milwaukee

9,500

7,959 23 Baltimore 17,039 5,492 63,926 Minneapolis

4,715

5,483 Boston 10,102 6,410 73,101 Newark

4,510 4,047 Brooklyn 18,716 12,976 139, 040 || New-Orleans

9,851

523 Buffalo 10,800 9,697 30,778 New-York

11,610 8.188292 Chicago 35,876 27,248 156,566 Omaha

3,240 2,548 16,8 Cincinnati 8,638 3,524 51,261 Philadelphia

28,493 17,996 157, 803 Cleveland 13,099 7,604 32,244 Pittsburg

7,866 4,800 32,753 Denver

3,657
2,055 13,909 Providence

3,754 2,3001 23, 133 Detroit 11,050 6,499 24,561 Rochester

5,846 6,118 15, 240 Indianapolis 4,857 2,749 15,373 St. Louis

13,740 4,964 72,681 Jersey City 4,063 2,401| 27,923 St. Paul

5,037 5, 265 15,328 Kansas City 3,299 2,835 20,385 San Francisco

8,060 3,220 41,097 Louisville 7,393 596 24,863 | Washington

8,346 2,637| 32,597 The following are the number of persons, by color, owning and hiring their farms and homes in the United States:

Farms.

Homes.
Color.

Owners. Tenants. Owners. Tenants. White.

3,018, 2611 1,194,032 2,775,399! 4,267,477 Negro

97,458 371, 600 110,158 606,958 Mixed.

23, 280 57,294 33.392 110,629 Indians.

3,686) 965)

2,835 2,528 Chinese and Japanese.

61

542) 1,8871 11, 710 Totals.....

3,142,746 1,624,4331 2,923,6711 4.999.802 Percentage of white persons, by place of birth, owning and hiring their farms and homes:

Farms.

Homes.
Owners.

Ten-
Free.
Incum-

Ten

Owners.
ants.
bered.

ants. Austria-Hungary

81.181 18.821 57.33 42.671 28.191 71.81 Canada & Newf'dland (English).. 80.29 19.71 49.84 50.16 34.69 63.31 Canada & Newl'dland (French). 82.82 17.18 54.18 45.82 23.04 76.28 England and Wales. 82.15 17.85 62.66 37.34 36.66

63.34 France..

83.94 16.06 70.35 29.65 36.87 63.13 Germany

80.93 19.07 60.28 39.72 42.76 57.24 Ireland.

86.93 13.07 61.52 38.48 36.42 63.58 Italy.

67.57 32.43 72.53 27.47 12.14 87.86 Norway, Sweden and Denmark. 84.97 15.03 51.05 48.95

41.83 58.17 Russia and Poland.

84.85 15.15 63.80 36.20 35.15 64.85 Scotland.

84.03 15.97 47.37 52.631

21.71

78.23 United States.

69.35 30.65

75.27 25.73 40.52 59.48 Other countries.

74.86 25.14 61.23 38.77 37.68 62.32

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[graphic]

THE EARTH. The area of the earth is 197,500,425 | Mount Everest, India, 29,002 feet; Mount square miles, of which 145,000,000 are of Dapsang, Thibet, 28,278 feet; Aconcagua. water and 52,500,425 of land; its circum

Chili, 22, 422 feet; Chimborazo, Ecuador, ference at the equator is 24,896.8214 stat

21,420 feet; Arequipa, Peru, 20,320 feet;

Kilima-Njaro, East Africa, 19,600 feet; ute miles. The diameter of the earth at

Logan, Canada, 19,500 feet, Elbouz, Rusthe poles is 7,898.8809 statute miles, and sia, 18,526 feet; Popocatepeti, Mexico, at the equator 7,924.9111 statute miles. Of 17,784 feet; Mt. Blanc, France, 15.810 the principal land divisions, North Amer- feet; Whitney, California, 14,898; Rainier, ica comprises 8,155,438 square miles; Washington, 14,444 feet; Pike's Peak. South America, 7,410,042 square miles; Colorado, 14,147 feet; Fremont's Peak Europe, 3,807,115 square miles; Asia, 16.- Wyoming, 13,576 feet. The largest lakes 428,854 square miles; Africa, 11,500,000 are Lake Superior, with an area of 32,00) square miles; Oceanica, 5,198,451 square square miles, and Lake Michigan, 25.600 miles. Among the highest mountains are square miles.

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