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immortal souls ? Your money perish with you ; for if this be your feeling, it is easy to perceive that you are in the gall of bitterness, and in the bond of iniquity. A piercing cry for assistance has this evening reached you; and if you forbear to deliver them that are drawn unto death, and those that are ready to be slain ; if you say, Behold, we knew it not; doth not He that pondereth the heart consider it? and He that keepeth the soul, doth He not know it? and shall not He render to every man according to his works ?'”

THE FORLORN OUTCAST.

Oh! do not break that bruised reed

Whose head so lowly bends;
Her very inmost heart hath need

Of comfort now,-and friends.
Say not “she's worthless ! ” who can tell

The misery of that hour
When “ let alone” by God-she fell

Into temptation's power?-
Perhaps bad oil been kindly pour'd

Into the festering wound,
Her eye, now bent on earth had soar'd

To brighter worlds around!
Drive not the “fallen ” from your door,

Though you the crime condemn,
Say, “ sister, go, and sin no more !"

Whom do you follow then?
For sure I am one kindly word

Spoken to deep distress;
Will win a blessing from our God,

And make dark sorrow less.
Whilst words of anger or reproof,

Can neither soothe nor save;
And driven from each friendly roof,
Her only rest's the Grave !

HENRY EDWARDS.

THE FEMALES' ADVOCATE.

AN APPEAL ON BEHALF OF INSTITUTIONS ESTABLISHED FOR THE BENEFIT OF FEMALE

SERVANTS. By the Rev. T. Wallace, of Petersfield. To improve the moral condition of female servants, is an object of great importance, but that this great design may be accomplished, it is absolutely necessary that Christians in general should take an interest in those societies, which are designed to elevate the character of servants, and to promote their welfare.

It is deeply to be lamented that these societies are so few in number, and so limited in their operations. They are not regarded as they should be, by the opulent portion of the community, or by those who have servants entrusted to their care, neither are they valued as they ought to be, by those who profess to be the disciples of Jesus Christ, and who are required, by the obligations which are imposed on them in the gospel, to communicate moraland religious bless. ings to persons sustaining every character, and filling every relation of life. These institutions are most inadequately supported. They are scarcely known to a large majority of the public, and their claims on the sympathies and concentrated exertions of British Christians have not been advocated, either from the pulpit, the platform, or the press, to the extent which

VOL. IV.

their importance demands. What society, for exam. ple, is more noble in its design-more important in its character-or calculated to be more beneficial in its results—than the London Female Mission? The writer is decidedly of opinion that no institution of the age, rich as the age is in institutions, is more scriptural in its spirit, more wise in its plans, or more direct and powerful in its bearings on the condition of female servants, than the Female Mission : and yet, how limited have been the contributions poured into its treasury! and how rarely have specific or united prayers been presented on its behalf ! Such a Society must not be neglected by those who are anxious for the purity and elevation of the female character. Such a Society must not be disregarded by those who profess to imitate the good Shepherd, who cares not only for the sheep in the fold, but seeks to recover the wanderers and the lost.

This institution, above all others, is calculated to meliorate the condition, the moral and religious condition, of our female domestics : it seeks, by its publications, to exhibit to them what is the great beauty of their character—to warn them of the perils by which they are surrounded—to teach them the duties which they are required to discharge-to unfold to them the obligations which are resting on them-to present before them the advantages arising out of a course of modest, amiable, virtuous, and holy, conduct, and by its houses of mercy it affords to them a safe shelter when most exposed to temptation and danger.

Philanthropists, then, and Christian brethren, in every portion of this highly-privileged empire, let not such a Society be crippled in its efforts, by the want of pecuniary support! Let it not languish, from a deficiency of sympathy and coöperation! Let it not fail of its ends, because you do not pray, and pray earnestly, for its usefulness and efficiency ! Remember that “ the day is far spent”—that “ the night is at hand:” You can only contribute to the cause of benevolence a little longer ! you can only make exertions to benefit and bless your fellow-creatures, a little longer ! you can only aim at the accomplishment of the purposes of divine wisdom, love, and mercy, a little longer ! you can only labor with the people of God, the friends of humanity, to reclaim the degraded and the vile from their career of misery and sin, a little longer! Wherefore, then, do you delay? The period is hastening when every professing Christian--every person who has domestics entrusted to her care, will have to stand before the judgment-seat of Christ. To what a searching scrutiny will every master and mistress be then exposed! How fearful an ordeal will all who have held positions of social responsibility have then to pass, and how tremendously awful the case of those who, in reply to the enquiry of the Judge, will be compelled to acknowledge that they have done nothing for the benefit of their fellow-creatures—nothing to relieve the poor-nothing to instruct the ignorantnothing to reclaim the wanderer—nothing to elevate and purify the character of those who were occupying the humble, yet most important, stations, in connection with domestic life! They formed bad habits, but we were not solicitous to see them corrected. They mingled with vicious society, we did not exert ourselves that a taste for what is pure, virtuous, and Christian, might be inspired. They exercised a most powerful influence over children, and especially at the most interesting and critical period of life, but we did not make any effort that this influence might be for good and not for evil. We connected ourselves with no society which sought their improve. ment. We presented no prayers for the purity and transformation of their character, we employed no means which might bear on their spiritual welfare.” What statements for any to make on the last great day! What solemn confessions for masters and mistresses possessing property, exercising influence, and, above all, professing the Christian religion, to utter, in the presence of the Sovereign of the Universe! Where is the parent-the employerthe mistress— the religious professor-the member of a Christian church-who should not instinctively shudder, at the slightest possibility of being placed in so awful a position! Arise, then, to the fulfilment of your high and solemn duties! and what you do, do quickly.

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Some ladies called on Lady Huntingdon one Monday Morning, having heard Mr. Whitfield preach the Evening before. Lady Huntingdon enquired how they liked him? “Oh,” replied they, “ of all the preachers we ever heard, he is the most strange and unaccountable; among other preposterous things he declared that Jesus Christ was so willing to receive sinners, that he did not object to receive even the Devil's cast-aways! Now, my lady, did you ever hear of such a thing before ?" Her ladyship readily acknowledged there was something a little singular in the invitation, but as Mr. Whitfield was at the time in the house, it was proposed to

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