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Printed by Nichols, Son, and Bentley, Red Lion Passage, Fleet Street, London

THE

• GENTLEMAN'S MAGAZINE

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J..ONDON Gazette

tGENERAt EvENINC

.Af.Post-M.Herald (Morning Chronic. jTiroes-M. Advert. j.P.Ledgers-Oracle

Brit. Press—Day St. James'sChron. hSun—Even. Mail .Star—Traveller 'Pilot—Statesman

Paeket-Lond.l.hr.

Albion—C. Chrnn,

Courier—Globe

Eng. Chron. — Inq.

Cour.d'Angleterre

Cour. de Londres

15otherWeeklyP.

17 Sunday Papers

Hue & Cry Police

Lit. Adv. monthly

Bath 3—Bristol 5

Berwick—Boston

Birmingham 3

Blackb. Brighton

Bury St. Edmund's

Carno.—Chath.

Carli.2—Chester 2

Chelms. Cambria.
Meteorological Diaries forOct. andDee.482,574
JMijJccnancou* £orn£pon&en«, Ki

Lord Thurlow—Bible carried off by Junot 483
Rewards to Authors.—Luke, and Damien 484
Tourthrough variousPar's of Flanders.&c 485
Literary Inquiries, ice.—Fires in London 487
Briefs, &c. 488.—Treasury at Whitehall 489
Of the Alien Priories, and their Revenues 490
On thin Congregations in our Clinches...AN
Heroic-Action of a Collier near Newb-rttle 493
On baking Bread and manufacturing Vest 494
Stage Coaches—Treatment of the Insane 495
Rare Edition of the Greek Tragedians.... 496
Cut lOusFontin Lekhamst-d Church, Bucks 4?7
Plat's *' Delightes for Ladies" described ibid...
Fragments Of I Itehature, No. XI. ...... 49S

The stupendous Fall of the Rhine 499

MS ofB&«ba,&c—Letter of SirP. Sidney 501 OnCros» Buns, and OH in the West Indies 503 Grammar Schools? —Sir N. B Gresley... 504

County History—Chester—Cornwall 505

Libraries in London temp. Queen Anne... 509 On the Moral Character of Dr. Young.... 511 Rem arks on the Westminster Play, 1S16...514 Te egrapnicCommunication—Semaphores5l7 Architecture of St. John's, Westminster . 519

DECEMBER, 1816,
CONTAINING

Cornw.-Covent. 2 Cumb.2-Doneast. Derb.—Dorchest. Dm ham — Essex F.xeter2, Glouc.2 Halifax—Hants 2 Hereford, Hull 3 Huntingd.-Kent4 !pswichl,Lancas. Leices.2--Leeds 2 Lichfield,' Liver.6 Maidst. Manch.4 N:ewc.3.—Notts.2 NToi thampton Norfolk, Norwich S.'\J'alcsOxford 2 Portsea—-Pottery Preston—-Plym.2 Reading—Salieb. Salop—Shfffield2 iiei b -rne, Sussex Shrewsbury Staff.—Stamf. 2 Taunton—Tyne Wakefi.—Warm Wolverh. Worm 2 Yr>rk3.lREr.AND37 Scotland 24. Jersey2.Guern.2.

0eUieto of Jflew l^uMcationS.

Childe Haiold's Pilgrimage, Canto 111....521 Warden's Letters respecting Buonaparte 524 Sermons, by Scott, 527; and by Rowlatt531

Travels in Brazil, by Henry Koster 532

Sir M. Hale's "Counsels" and " Advice" 534

Time's Telescope for the year 1817 535

Identity of Junius with a Living Character 537

Literary Intel Licence 541

Borromeo-Collection of Italia.uNovels 543

Select Poetry for December 1816 ...544-548 Prologue &. Epilogue to Westminster Play 544

l9i£torical Cbronicte.

Abstract of principal Foreign Occurrences 548 Country News554. — DomesticOccurrences555 Account of the late Disturbances in London 556

Public Schools in the Metropolis 560

Theatre, Pomotions, Preferments, Births...561

Marriages of eminent Persons 562

Character of Charles Eati Stauhope 563

Mrs. Boner Pigott 594

M. Wodhull, EST-- W. Alexander, Esq. 565 Obituary," ithAneed.of remarkable i'ersons566 Epitaph on the Right Hon. W. Windham 574 Bill of Mortality.—Prices of Markets, Sec.575 Canal, &c. Shares.. —Prices of the Stocks...576

Embellished with Elevations of the Treasury at Whitehall in its former, late, and present State; and with a View of a curious Font in Lekhamstes Church, Buck*.

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Cited by Nichols, Son, and Bentley, at Cicero's Head, Red Lion Passage, Fleet-str. London where all Letters to the Editor are particularly desired to be addressed, Post-paid.

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TT Laeken, Brussels,

Mr. Urban, n

'Jjec.S.

I BEG you will allow me a short space in your Magazine to notice a report, mentioned by Mr. Belsham, with regard to the opinion of the late Lord Thurlow, upon the controversy between the late learned Prelate, the Bishop of St. Asaph, and the late Dr. Priestley. All the argument of the question has been perfectly stated by my Lord the Bishop of St. David's; to thew, that Lord Thurlow cannot, in reason, be thought to have held any such opinion. If he never held th at opinion, he never expressed it. I do, indeed, absolutely believe that my late noble and venerable Relation never thought, and, consequently, never expressed himself in the terms of that report. And I believe this, at well upon the grounds advanced by the learned Bishop of St. David's, as upon my own knowledge of the respect and friendship which dwell in the bosom of the late Chancellor towards that great and deceased Prelate. I beg you to believe me, Mr. Urban, your obedient and faithful servant, Thubiow.

,, TT Hampton-court,

Mr. Urban, &„. 28.

IT is stated in p. 61, « That the celebrated Bible which Junot carried off from Portugal was not in the sale of his Library which took place in Pall Mall; and that the Government of Portugal were so anxious to redeem this great curiosity, that they had offered Madame Junot 80,000 livres, but she bad required 150,000." lam enabled to assure you for a fact, that the munificence and justice of his Majesty Louis XVIII. (to efface, if it were possible, the remembrance of this sacrilegious theft) purchased this celebrated Bible of Junot's widow, and paid her 80,000 francs for it. It was remitted to the Chevalier de Brito, Charge d'Affaires de Por

tugal, in the month of March ISIS, by order of the King, to be restored to the Convent of Salem, near Lisbon.

I had the opportunity of examining this Bible, unique of its kind, for several successive evenings, in the apartments of that excellent diplomatic character, in the Hotel de Brancas at Paris. It is written entirely with the pen, in nine folio volumes; and is illustrated with engravings, which form pictures in the most expressive and' brilliant 'style.

The Chevalier de Brito had the good fortune to consign this invaluable Work to the care of CapitaineLe Chevalier Beaurepiere, a few days before the return of Buonaparte from Elba; and I have been recently informed that it again ornaments the Library of the Convent dc Balern, near Lisbon. You will have pleasure in stating to the publick a circumstance which reflects so much honour on his Majesty Louis XVllI.; a King, who, in retirement and on the throne, has been a bright example of every religious duty. H. P,

Mr. Urban, Dec. 4.

HAVING noticed in a French Journal a statement that Literature in England meets with no encouragement, either public or private, I beg you to insert the following answer to it from one of our periodical prints.

"It is well known, that a living Writer of Poetry has received a sum for his productions which it would startle a Frenchman to name. We believe we may safely state, that his gains, for one year, by mere Literature, have amounted to 6000/. In England we know nothing of Government-encouragement of Literature; with the exception of the Laureate's 200/. a year: we leave the Government to its proper business, and confine the remuneration of our writers to the Booksellers, who very wisely buy nothing that will not sell. What they can afford to give, therefore, and do give to our Authors, is good aud faithful proof

<rf of the means and intellect of our people i and hence it affords important information as to our general national condition and character. Mr. Moore's new Poem is eagerly expected; and the Booksellers, we believe, hold themselves prepared to give 2 or 3000/. for it. Madame D'ArNay (late Miss Burney) is now living in France; she can declare, we apprehend, that for her last Novel, which was not her best, she did not receive less than 1500/. Mr. Murray bought thelasttrabody (theGamesters) for400/. Mr. ColeTidge's Caprice of Christabel procured him, we are assured, a Bank Note fori clot. The copyright of The Rejected Addresses, and a few Parodies of Horace, was purchased for 1000/. of the Authors; and 16,000 copies at least have been sold. Lord Byron's Poetical Works have produced, to one person or another, a sum that may fairly be described as forming a considerable fortune. Mr. Southey has amassed a large and most valuable library, and lives in comfort and great respectability, solely by his literary exertions. The Edinburgh Review sells nearly 12,0G0 copies four times a year. It is a splendid property to its Editor and its Publishers; while 40, 50. 60, and loot. are given for each of the Essays of which it is composed.—We believe we have stated enough to make our French Author lick his lips at English encouragement of letters. He has been most unlucky in his assertions; for almost each of them admits of a denial as to the matter of fact. Ignorant, indeed, must he be, who represents Literature as neglected and unsupported in England of late years. If he had said, that the popular eagerness and liberality had done mischief in the opposite way to that of starvation, he might have written to the prejudice of the Country, which he hates for its superiority, with some effect."

Yours, &c, B.N.

Mr. Urban, Dec. 8.

FROM Boswell's Life of Johnson it appears that line 480 of Goldsmith's Poem of ,J The Traveller," and the concluding 10 lines, except the following couplet, were furnished by Dr. Johnson.

"The lifted axe, the agonizing wheel, Luke's iron crown, and Damien's bed of steel."

Of Luke it is stated, that in the "Republican Hungarica" there is an account of a desperate rebellion in "id, headed by two brothers, Luke and George Zeck. When quelled, George, not Luke, was punished by

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his head being encircled with a hot iron crown.

Damien was a fanatic, who in the year 1756 attempted to assassinats LouisXV. and actually wounded him in the presence of his son and his guards. When put to the torture, he declared it was not his intention to kill the King, but only wound him, that God might touch his heart, and incline turn to restore peace to his dominions, which had been much agitated by the disputes between the Parliament and Clergy respecting the Papal Bull Uni- genitus, which was enforced by the King, in opposition to the Parliament and people, and by which the Jauienists were declared heretical.

Although the insanity of Damien was evident from his expressions, he was put to a most cruel and lingering death by the rack, which is figuratively called a " a bed of steel."

As possibly some of your Readers might not have been aware who the persons alluded to were, your insertion of the above rtill much oblige, Yours, &c. J. S.

Tour through various Paris of the Netherlands and Germany in 18tS. (Continued from page 898.)

IN travelling npou the Continent, especially through France, Germany, aud the Netherlands, the researches of the inquisitive Tourist are greatly facilitated by the local maps and statistical accounts which are to be met with in most of the principal towns. To these sources of information I am indebted for many sketches of History and Biography, which otherwise would have escaped my notice; and which,I flatter myself, your Readers are not displeased tosee occasionally interwoven with the narrative of my travels and adventures. My invariable practice on landing at my inn (and which I would r. commend to all who travel for information) was to hire a valet de place, to conduct me to the booksellers' shops, where my first inquiry was, whether they had any local maps, topographies, directories,or almanacks? from which last I have often derived much useful instruction, as well as enter taininent. I found the booksellers in general well informed and obliging, many of them capable of conversing tolerably in Latin; and some not undeserving of the praise of scholarship

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