A Statistical Account of the British Empire: Exhibiting Its Extent, Physical Capacities, Population, Industry, and Civil and Religious Institutions, Volume 2

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C. Knight, 1839 - Great Britain - 718 pages
 

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Page 465 - Forgery at common law has been defined as 'the fraudulent making or alteration of a writing to the prejudice of another man's right
Page 83 - That the pretended power of dispensing with laws, or the execution of laws by regal authority, as it hath been assumed and exercised of late, is illegal. 3. That the commission for erecting the late Court of Commissioners for Ecclesiastical Causes, and all other commissions and courts of like nature, are illegal and pernicious.
Page 3 - The statesman, who should attempt to direct private people in what manner they ought to employ their capitals, would not only load himself with a most unnecessary attention, but assume an authority which could safely be trusted, not only to no single person, but to no council or senate whatever, and which would nowhere be so dangerous as in the hands of a man who had folly and presumption enough to fancy himself fit to exercise it.
Page 123 - Will you solemnly promise and swear to govern the people of this kingdom of England, and the dominions thereto belonging, according to the statutes in parliament agreed on, and the laws and customs of the same?
Page 83 - That the freedom of speech, and debates or proceedings in parliament, ought not to be impeached or questioned in any court or place out of parliament.
Page 615 - ... a convenient stock of flax, hemp, wool, thread, iron, and other necessary ware and stuff to set the poor on work, and also competent sums of money for and towards the necessary relief of the lame, impotent, old, blind, and such other among them being poor and not able to work...
Page 432 - That the raising or keeping a standing army within the kingdom in time of peace, unless it be with consent of parliament, is against law.
Page 123 - Will you to the utmost of your power maintain the laws of God, the true profession of the gospel, and the Protestant reformed religion established by the law? And will you preserve unto the bishops and clergy of this realm, and to the churches committed to their charge, all such rights and privileges as by law do or shall appertain unto them, or any of them? King or queen: All this I promise to do.
Page 297 - I protest before God and your lordships, that I profess and allow with my heart the true religion presently professed within this realm, and authorised by the laws thereof ; I shall abide thereat, and defend the same to my life's end, renouncing the Roman religion called papistry.
Page 275 - A claimant here enters into the produce who contributed no assistance whatever to the production. When years perhaps of care and toil have matured an improvement ; when the husbandman sees new crops ripening to his skill and industry ; the moment he is ready to put his 'sickle to the grain, he finds himself compelled to divide his harvest with a stranger. Tithes are a tax, not only upon industry which feeds mankind; upon that species of exertion which it is the aim of all wise laws to cherish and...

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