The Life of Samuel Johnson, LL.D.

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J. Buckland, 1787 - Authors, English - 605 pages

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Page 350 - Certainly, it is heaven upon earth, to have a man's mind move in charity, rest in providence, and turn upon the poles of truth.
Page 299 - ... representing him on horseback, with a lance in one hand and a book in the other...
Page 235 - A physician in a great city seems to be the mere plaything of fortune; his degree of reputation is, for the most part, totally casual — they that employ him know not his excellence; they that reject him know not his deficience.
Page 519 - From zeal or malice now no more we dread, For English vengeance wars not with the dead, A generous foe regards with pitying eye The man whom fate has laid where all must lie. To wit, reviving from its author's dust, Be kind, ye judges, or at least be just : Let no renewed hostilities invade Th' oblivious grave's inviolable shade.
Page 197 - Then, crush'd by rules, and weaken'd as refin'd, For years the pow'r of tragedy declin'd; From bard to bard the frigid caution crept, Till Declamation roar'd whilst Passion slept; Yet still did Virtue deign the stage to tread, Philosophy remain'd though Nature fled.
Page 198 - Ah ! let not Censure term our fate our choice, The stage but echoes back the public voice ; The drama's laws, the drama's patrons give, For we that live to please, must please to live.
Page 63 - ... light that it appears to me, I hope you will burn this, and pardon me for giving you so much trouble about an impracticable thing ; but, if you think there is a probability of obtaining the favour asked, I am sure your humanity, and propensity to relieve merit in distress, will incline you to serve the poor man, without my adding any more to the -trouble I have already given you, than assuring you that I am, with great truth, sir, " Your faithful servant,
Page 557 - The busy day, the peaceful night, Unfelt, uncounted, glided by ; His frame was firm, his powers were bright, Though now his eightieth year was nigh. Then, with no throbs of fiery pain, No cold gradations of decay, Death broke at once the vital chain, And freed his soul the nearest way.
Page 175 - The books he used for this purpose were what he had in his own collection, a copious but a miserably ragged one, and all such as he could borrow; which latter, if ever they came back to those that lent them, were so defaced as to be scarce worth owning, and yet, some of his friends were glad to receive and entertain them as curiosities.
Page 126 - He will learn, sir, that to accuse and prove are very different, and that reproaches unsupported by evidence affect only the character of him that utters them. Excursions of fancy, and flights of oratory, are indeed, pardonable in young...

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