Lays of the Highlands and Islands, Issue 423

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Page 118 - ... then, from the battle's roar His foster-brother stoutly bore, His foster-brother, with service true, Back to the village of Waterloo. And they laid him on the soft green sod, And he breathed his spirit there to God, But not till he heard the loud hurrah Of victory billowed from Quatre Bras, Where the Cameron men were wanted. By the road to Ghent they buried him then, This noble chief of the Cameron men, And not an eye was tearless seen That day beside the alley green : Wellington wept, the iron...
Page xli - Where the blue /Egean smiles, But give to me the Scottish sea, That breaks round the Western Isles ! Jerusalem, Athens, and Rome, I would see them before I die ; But I'd rather not see any one of the three, Than be exiled for ever from Skye...
Page 165 - And all the strangely-woven strife Of high and low, and swift and slow, Makes music in a larger life. " As the huge branches of a tree Clash, when the stormy buffets blow ; Hostile they seem, but one they be, And by the strife that shakes them grow. " So the vast world of adverse things, That with a reeling fury nod, Battles of Churches and of Kings, Have one unshaken root in God. " Who this believes will fear no harm From counted articles or beads ; There's room in God's wide-circling arm For all...
Page 25 - And he mildly look'd around, And he raised his arm to bless them, But it dropped upon the ground ; And his breathless body rested On the arms that held him dear, And his dead face look'd upon them With a light serene and clear ; And they said that holy angels Surely hover'd round his head, For alive no loveliest ever Look'd so lovely as this dead. Stranger, thou hast heard my story, Thank thee for thy patient ear ; We are pleased to stir the sleeping Memory of old greatness here. I have used no gloss,...
Page 119 - This noble chief of the Cameron men, And not an eye was tearless seen That day beside the alley green : Wellington wept — the iron man ! And from every eye in the Cameron clan The big round drop in bitterness fell, As with the pipes he loved so well His funeral wail they chanted. And now he sleeps (for they bore him home, When the war was done, across the foam) Beneath the shadow of Nevis Ben, With his sires, the pride of the Cameron men. Three thousand Highlandmen stood round, As they laid him...
Page 49 - I will tell thee why, And, if my fancy jumps not with thy whim, What marvel? there is scope beneath the sky For things that creep, and fly, and walk, and swim. I love the free breath of the broad-wing'd breeze, I love the eye's free sweep from craggy rim, I love the free bird, poised at lofty ease, And the free torrent's far-upsounding hymn; I love to leave my littleness behind, In the low vale where little cares are great...
Page 157 - N the lone glen the silver lake doth sleep ; Sleeps the white cloud upon the sheer black hill: All moorland sounds a solemn silence keep ; I only hear the tiny trickling rill 'Neath the red moss. Athwart the dim grey pall, That veils the day, a dusky fowl may fly ; But, on this bleak brown moor, if thou shalt call For men, a spirit will sooner make reply. Come hither, thou whose agile mind doth flit From talk to talk, and tempt the pensive mood. Converse with men makes sharp the glittering wit. But...
Page 31 - ... work, with no season of play, boys, Makes Jack a dull boy in the end! MOONLIGHT. THOU mystic moon that o'er the dim gray sound Ray'st forth a yellow stream of thin, cold light, If aught thou hast of knowledge more profound That told might profit bring to mortal wight, Tell me: if not, why should...
Page 97 - Gives Cruachan greeting again. O'er dread Glencoe The greeting doth go And where Ettive winds fair in the glen ; And he hears the call In his steep north wall, "God bless thee, old Cruachan Ben.

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