Lectures on Teaching Delivered in the University of Cambridge During the Lent Term, 1880

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The University Press, 1881 - Teaching - 436 pages
 

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Page 354 - That man is little to be envied, whose patriotism would not gain force upon the plain of Marathon, or whose piety would not grow • warmer among the ruins of lona.
Page 430 - But if a man live many years, and rejoice in them all; yet let him remember the days of darkness; for they shall be many.
Page 5 - Nalopakhyanam, or, The Tale of Nala ; containing the Sanskrit Text in Roman Characters, followed by a Vocabulary in which each word is placed under its root, with references to derived words in cognate languages, and a sketch of Sanskrit Grammar. By the Rev. THOMAS JARRETT, MA , Trinity College, Regius Professor of Hebrew, late Professor of Arabic, and formerly Fellow of St Catharine's College, Cambridge.
Page 436 - The Missing Fragment of the Latin Translation of the Fourth Book of Ezra, discovered, and edited with an Introduction and Notes, and a facsimile of the MS., by ROBERT L. BENSLY, MA, Sub-Librarian of the University Library, and Reader in Hebrew, Gonville and Caius College, Cambridge.
Page 436 - The Pointed Prayer Book, being the Book of Common Prayer with the Psalter or Psalms of David, pointed as they are to be sung or said in Churches.
Page 3 - Octavo. 6d. Select Discourses, by JOHN SMITH, late Fellow of Queens' College, Cambridge. Edited by HG WILLIAMS, BD late Professor of Arabic. Royal Octavo.
Page 3 - To spend too much time in studies is sloth ; to use them too much for ornament is affectation ; to make judgment wholly by their rules is the humour of a scholar.
Page 3 - ... studies themselves do give forth directions too much at large, except they be bounded in by experience. Crafty men contemn studies, simple men admire them, and wise men use them, for they teach not their own use; but that is a wisdom without them, and above them, won by observation.
Page 264 - But now farewell. I am going a long way With these thou seest - — if indeed I go — For all my mind is clouded with a doubt — To the island- valley of Avilion; Where falls not hail, or rain, or any snow, Nor ever wind blows loudly; but it lies Deep-meadow'd, happy, fair with orchard lawns And bowery hollows crown'd with summer sea, Where I will heal me of my grievous wound.
Page 272 - STUDIES serve for delight, for ornament, and for ability. Their chief use for delight is in privateness and retiring; for ornament, is in discourse; and for ability, is in the judgment and disposition of business...

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