Defence of Massachusetts

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private distribution, 1856 - Kansas - 33 pages

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Page 32 - ... then we desire to know it. Massachusetts, if her sons and representatives are to have the rod held over them, if these things are to continue, the time may come — though she utters no threats — when she may be called upon to withdraw them to her own bosom, where she can furnish to them that protection which is not vouchsafed to them under the flag of their common country. But while she permits us to remain we shall do our duty — our whole duty, We shall speak whatever we choose to speak,...
Page 28 - ... launched against tyranny. It was severe as Chatham was severe, when he defended the feeble colonies against the giant oppression of the mother country. It was made in the face of a hostile Senate. It continued through the greater portion of two days ; and yet, during that time, the speaker was not once called to order. This fact is conclusive as to the personal and parliamentary decorum of the speech. He had provocation enough. His State had been called 'hypocritical.' He himself had been called...
Page 27 - Massa, chusetts orator. To say that we were delighted with the speech we heard, would but faintly express the deep emotions of our hearts, awakened by it. I need not speak of the classic purity of its language, nor of the nobility of its sentiments. It was heard by many ; it/ . has been read by millions. There has been no such speech made in the Senate since the days when those Titans of American eloquence — the Websters and the Haynes, contended with each other for mastery.
Page 30 - I denounce it in the name of the constitution it violated. I denounce it in the name of the sovereignty of Massachusetts, which was stricken down by the blow. I denounce it in the name of civilization, which it outraged. I denounce it in the name of humanity. I denounce it in the name of that fair play which bullies and prize-fighters respect.
Page 30 - I denonnce it in the name of humanity. I denounce it in the name of that fair play which bullies and prize-fighters respect. What ! strike a man when he is pinioned, — • when he cannot respond to a blow ? Call you that chivalry ? In what code of honor did you get your authority for that ? I do not believe that member has a friend so dear who must not, in his heart of hearts, condemn the act. Even the member himself, if he has left a spark of that chivalry and gallantry attributed to him, must...
Page 21 - Where, then, would be the glory of " Old Ironsides, " whose scuppers ran red with Massachusetts blood? Where, then, would be the history of the daring of those brave fishermen, who swarmed from all her bays and all her ports, sweeping the enemy's commerce from the most distant seas ? Ah, sir ! she cannot afford to blot out that history. You, sir, cannot afford to let her do it — no, not even the South. She sustained herself in the last war; she paid her own expenses and has not yet been paid entirely...
Page 21 - ... almost as the stars. He looked on that warlike land and the memory of the olden time came back Upon him. He remembered how, more than forty years before, he had trodden on that soil; he remembered how vauntingly he invaded it and how speedily he left it. He turned his glasses toward it and beheld its people rushing from the mountains to the sea to defend it; and he dared not attack it. Its capital stood in the salt sea spray, yet he could not take it. He sailed south, where there was another...
Page 30 - ... place which had hitherto been held sacred against violence — and smote him as Cain smote his brother One blow was enough ; but it did not satiate the wrath of that spirit which had pursued him through two days. Again, and again, and again, quicker and faster, fell the leaden blows, until he was...
Page 28 - a puppy," "a fool," Ťa fanatic," and "a dishonest man." Yet he was parliamentary from the beginning to the end of his speech. No man knew better than he did the proprieties of the place, for he had always observed them. No man knew better than he did parliamentary law, because he had made it the study of his life. No man saw more clearly than he did the flaming sword of the Constitution, turning every way, guarding all the avenues of the Senate. But he was not thinking of these things; he was not...
Page 33 - God knows, they desire to cultivate those feelings — feelings of social kindness, and public kindness. The House will bear witness that we have not violated or trespassed upon any of them ; but, sir, if we are pushed too long and too far, there are men from the old Commonwealth of Massachusetts who will not shrink from a defence of freedom of speech, and the honored State they represent, on any field where they may be assailed.

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