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From an Original Painting, in the great gallery, of Sir Francis Bacon Lord Verulam.

A

SKETCH

OF THE

HISTORY OF MARYLAND,

DURING THE

THREE FIRST YEARS AFTER ITS SETTLEMENT:

TO WHICH IS PREFIXED,

A

COPIOUS INTRODUCTION.

BY JOHN LEEDS BOZMAN.

BALTIMORE:

PUBLISHED BY EDWARD J. COALE,

No. 176, Baltimore-street.

1811.

District of Maryland, to wit:

BE IT REMEMBERED, That on this first day of October, in the thirty-fifth year of the Independence of the United States of America, Edward J. Coale, of the said district, hath deposited in this office, the title of a book, the right whereof he claims as proprietor, in the words following, to wit:

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"A SKETCH of the HISTORY OF MARYLAND, during the three first years after its settlement, to which is prefixed, a Copious Introduction. "By John Leeds Bozman."

In conformity to the Act of the Congress of the United States, entitled "An act for the encouragement of Learning, by securing the copies of Maps, Charts, and Books, to the authors and proprietors of such copies during the times therein mentioned;" And also to the act entitled "An act supplementary to the act entitled, "An act for the encouragement of Learning, by securing the copies of Maps, Charts and Books, to the authors and proprietors of such copies during the times therein mentioned," and extending the benefits there of to the arts of designing, engraving and etching Historical and other Prints. PHILIP MOORE, Clerk of the District of Maryland

BOD

ILLUREA

PREFACE.

IT will, perhaps, be expected by the public, that some reason should be assigned for publishing an Introduction to a History without the history itself. The author has to reply in explanation thereof, that his original intention was most certainly to complete the work he had undertaken. As this design of his has been of long standing, and numerous circumstances have intervened so as to interrupt his progress therein, it would afford but little amusement or satisfaction to the reader to peruse a rehearsal of them here in detail. It will be sufficient to mention, that whenever the author's occupation in life would permit his indulgence in any literary pursuit, that of history always presented to him the strongest attractions. But as it is natural for every man to feel an anxiety to know something of the transactions of his own neighbourhood, rather than of those abroad, so an acquaintance with the history of our native country is a more natural object of desire than that of distant nations. A native of the American States, will always feel an interest in the affairs of any one of them. But contracting the circle of his patriotic sensations to a smaller compass, he finds that the individual state, of which he is a citizen, nay indeed the county and neighbourhood of his nativity, will more particularly claim both his affection and his attention. The citizen of Maryland, however, has hitherto in vain inquired for some information relative to the past transactions of his own individual state. While almost every

other state in the Union has had its historian, Maryland, though one of the earliest British colonies, has never yet

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