Page images
PDF
EPUB
[ocr errors]

THE

WORKS

OF TE1

RIGHT REVEREND

WILLIAM WARBURTON,D.D.

LORD BISHOP OF GLOUCESTER.

A NEW EDITION,
IN TWELVE VOLUMES.

TO WHICH IS PREFIXED

A DISCOURSE BY WAY OF GENERAL PREFACE;

CONTAINING

SOME ACCOUNT OF THE LIFE, WRITINGS, AND CHARACTER
OF THE AUTHOR;

BY RICHARD HURD,D.D.

LORD BISHOP OF WORCESTER.

VOLUME THE THIRD.

SLonbon:

Printed by Luke Hansard $ Sons, near Lincoln's-Itm Fields,

FOR T. CADELL AND W. DAVIES, IN THE STRAND.

0^^^\^~u ......

[ocr errors]

THE DIVINE LEGATION.

BOOK III.

Proves The Necessity Of The Doctrine Of A Future,
State To Society, From The Opinion And Conduct
Of The Ancient Sages And Philosophers - P. I

-SECT. I. Testimonies of ancient sages and philosophers,

• concerning the necessity of the doctrine of a future state

to civil society - pp. l—12

SECT. II, That none of the ancient philosophers believed

the doctrine of a future state of rewards and punishments,

though, on account of its confessed necessity to the sup-

port of religion, and consequently of civil society, all

the theistical philosophers sedulously taught it to the

people. The several senses in which the Ancients con-

ceived the permanency of the human soul explained.

Several general reasons premised, to shew that the

ancient philosophers did not always believe what they

taught, and that they taught the doctrine of a future state

of rewards and punishments without believing it: Where

the principles that induced the ancient sages to make it

lawful to .deceive for public good, in matters of religion,

are explained, whereby they are seen to be such as had

no place in the propagation or genius of the Jewish and

Christian religions. In the course of this enquiry, the

rise, progress, perfection, decline, and genius of the

ancient Greek philosophy, under its several divisions, are

considered and explained - - - pp.12—44

SECT. III. Enters on a particular enquiry into the senti-

ments of each sect of philosophy on this point. The

division and succession of their schools. The character

of Socrates; and of the new and old Academy. The

character and genius of each sect of the grand Quaternion

of theistic philosophy, the Pythagoric, the Platonic, the

Peripatetic, and the Stoic: shewing that not one of these

believed the doctrine of a future state of rewards and

punishments. The character of Tully, and his sentiments

on

« PreviousContinue »