Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine, Volume 16

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W. Blackwood & Sons, 1824 - Scotland
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Page 537 - And the poor beetle that we tread upon, In corporal sufferance finds a pang as great As when a giant dies.
Page 449 - O that I had wings like a dove : for then would I flee away, and be at rest.
Page 477 - Woe unto you, scribes and Pharisees, hypocrites! for ye compass sea and land to make one proselyte, and when he is made, ye make him twofold more the child of hell than yourselves.
Page 579 - Bryologia Britannica: Containing the Mosses of Great Britain and Ireland systematically arranged and described according to the Method of Bruch and Schimper ; with 61 illustrative Plates. Being a New Edition, enlarged and altered, of the Muscologia Britannica of Messrs. Hooker and Taylor. 8vo. 42s.; or, with the Plates coloured, price 4.
Page 146 - And the ark rested in the seventh month, on the seventeenth day of the month, upon the mountains of Ararat.
Page 242 - Life of Andrew Melville. Containing Illustrations of the Ecclesiastical and Literary History of Scotland in the Sixteenth and Seventeenth Centuries. Crown 8vo, 6s. History of the Progress and Suppression of the Reformation in Italy in the Sixteenth Century.
Page 182 - Around he look'd with changeless brow On many a torture nigh : The rack, the chain, the axe, the wheel, And, worst of all, his own red steel. I saw him once before ; he rode Upon a coal-black steed, And tens of thousands throng'd the road And bade their warrior speed.
Page 334 - Typographia; or, the Printer's Instructor: including an Account of the Origin of Printing, with Biographical Notices of the Printers of England, from Caxton to the Close of the Sixteenth Century...
Page 323 - There's language in her eye, her cheek, her lip, Nay, her foot speaks ; her wanton spirits look out At every joint and motive of her body. O, these encounterers, so glib of tongue, That give a coasting welcome ere it comes.
Page 303 - AND now Olympus' shining gates unfold ; The gods, with Jove, assume their thrones of gold : Immortal Hebe, fresh with bloom divine, The golden goblet crowns with purple wine : While the full bowls flow round, the powers employ Their careful eyes on long-contended Troy. When Jove, disposed to tempt Saturnia's spleen, Thus waked the fury of his partial queen.

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