The Spectator: ...

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Phil. Crampton, 1737
 

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Page 259 - ... all Nature cries aloud Through all her works), he must delight in virtue ; And that which he delights in must be happy. But when, or where ? — This world was made for Caesar.
Page 37 - Behold, I go forward, but he is not there ; and backward, but I cannot perceive him : on the left hand, where he doth work, but I cannot behold him : he hideth himself on the right hand, that I cannot see him : but he knoweth the way that I take : when he hath tried me, I shall come forth as gold.
Page 11 - I did not question, came loaded with his crimes; but, upon searching into his bundle, I found that, instead of throwing his guilt from him, he had only laid down his memory. He was followed by another worthless rogue, who flung away his modesty, instead of his ignorance.
Page 11 - The immoderate breadth of the features made me very much out of humour with my own countenance, upon which I threw it from me like a mask. It happened very luckily that one who stood by me had just before thrown down his visage, which it seems was too long for him.
Page 67 - to the sun, and water to the diamond. It irradiates every metal, and enriches lead with all the properties of gold. It heightens smoke into flame, flame into light, and light into glory.
Page 53 - We may assure ourselves that the great Author of nature will not always be as one who is indifferent to any of his creatures.
Page 134 - ... there is more beauty in the works of a great genius, who is ignorant of all the rules of art, than in the works of a little genius, who not only knows but scrupulously observes them.
Page 10 - I saw multitudes of old women throw down their wrinkles, and several young ones who stripped themselves of a tawny skin.
Page 71 - We make provisions for this life, as though it were never to have an end, and for the other life, as though it were never to have a beginning. Should a spirit of superior rank, who is a stranger to human nature, accidentally alight upon the earth, and take a survey of its inhabitants ; what would his notions of us...
Page 10 - Jupiter, that every mortal should bring in his griefs and calamities, and throw them together in a heap. There was a large plain appointed for this purpose. I took my stand in the centre of it, and saw with a great deal of pleasure the whole human species marching one after another, and throwing down their several loads, which immediately grew up into a prodigious mountain, that seemed to rise above the clouds.

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