McGuffey's Fifth Eclectic Reader, Volume 5

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Van Antwerp, Bragg & Company, 1879 - Readers - 352 pages
A traditional reader including stories, poems, and new word drills.

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - DarthDeverell - LibraryThing

These reproductions of McGuffey's readers are useful volumes for those interested in the history of education in America. The content is faithful to the original and the binding is sturdy. I work at a ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - DarthDeverell - LibraryThing

These reproductions of McGuffey's readers are useful volumes for those interested in the history of education in America. The content is faithful to the original and the binding is sturdy. I work at a ... Read full review

Contents

I
9
II
39
III
43
IV
44
V
49
VI
50
VII
52
VIII
54
LX
185
LXI
189
LXII
193
LXIII
195
LXV
196
LXVI
200
LXVII
204
LXVIII
207

IX
59
X
60
XI
62
XII
63
XIII
67
XIV
69
XV
71
XVI
72
XVII
74
XVIII
77
XIX
78
XX
81
XXI
82
XXII
85
XXIII
87
XXIV
88
XXV
91
XXVI
92
XXVII
95
XXVIII
96
XXIX
101
XXX
103
XXXI
108
XXXII
110
XXXIII
113
XXXIV
114
XXXV
117
XXXVI
119
XXXVII
121
XXXVIII
123
XXXIX
128
XL
132
XLI
135
XLII
138
XLIII
143
XLIV
146
XLV
148
XLVI
151
XLVII
154
XLVIII
156
XLIX
159
L
161
LI
163
LII
167
LIII
170
LIV
171
LV
172
LVI
176
LVII
177
LVIII
180
LIX
183
LXIX
216
LXX
221
LXXI
228
LXXII
230
LXXIII
232
LXXIV
234
LXXV
239
LXXVI
241
LXXVII
245
LXXVIII
246
LXXIX
247
LXXX
252
LXXXI
253
LXXXII
258
LXXXIII
259
LXXXIV
262
LXXXV
263
LXXXVI
266
LXXXVII
269
LXXXVIII
271
LXXXIX
273
XC
276
XCI
277
XCII
278
XCIII
282
XCIV
284
XCV
286
XCVI
288
XCVII
290
XCVIII
292
XCIX
295
C
296
CI
301
CII
302
CIII
308
CIV
309
CV
312
CVI
315
CVII
319
CVIII
321
CIX
326
CX
328
CXI
333
CXII
338
CXIII
342
CXIV
343
CXV
348
CXVI
349
CXVII
350
CXVIII
351
Copyright

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Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 277 - O well for the fisherman's boy, That he shouts with his sister at play ! O well for the sailor lad, That he sings in his boat on the bay ! And the stately ships go on To their haven under the hill; But O for the touch of a...
Page 199 - Sir, before God, I believe the hour is come. My judgment approves this measure, and my whole heart is in it. All that I have, and all that I am, and all that I hope, in this life, I am now ready here to stake upon it; and I leave off as I began, that live or die, survive or perish, I am for the Declaration. It is my living sentiment, and by the blessing of God it shall be my dying sentiment, Independence now, and Independence forever.
Page 168 - Thou coveredst it with the deep As with a garment : The waters stood above the mountains. At Thy rebuke They fled ; At the voice of Thy thunder They hasted away.
Page 96 - Nay, not so," Replied the Angel. Abou spoke more low, But cheerly still; and said, "I pray thee, then, Write me as one that loves his fellow-men." The angel wrote, and vanished. The next night It came again with a great wakening light, And showed the names whom love of God had blessed, And lo! Ben Adhem's name led all the rest.
Page 154 - The smith, a mighty man is he, With large and sinewy hands ; And the muscles of his brawny arms Are strong as iron bands. His hair is crisp, and black, and long, His face is like the tan ; His brow is wet with honest sweat, He earns whate'er he can, And looks the whole world in the face, For he owes not any man.
Page 295 - Oft in the stilly night Ere slumber's chain has bound me, Fond memory brings the light Of other days around me: The smiles, the tears Of boyhood's years, The words of love then spoken; The eyes that shone, Now dimmed and gone, The cheerful hearts now broken! Thus in the stilly night Ere slumber's chain has bound me, Sad memory brings the light Of other days around me.
Page 335 - Again he felt and fumbled at the pig. It did not burn him so much now ; still, he licked his fingers from a sort of habit. The truth at length broke into his slow understanding that it was the pig that smelt so, and the pig that tasted so delicious...
Page 95 - ABOU BEN ADHEM (may his tribe increase!) Awoke one night from a deep dream of peace, And saw within the moonlight in his room, Making it rich and like a lily in bloom, An angel writing in a book of gold: Exceeding peace had made Ben Adhem bold, And to the presence in the room he said, "What writest thou?" The vision raised its head, And, with a look made of all sweet accord, Answered, "The names of those who love the Lord.
Page 36 - I'm the chief of Ulva's Isle, And this Lord Ullin's daughter. "And fast before her father's men Three days we've fled together, For should he find us in the glen, My blood would stain the heather. "His horsemen hard behind us ride; Should they our steps...
Page 118 - In the cold moist earth we laid her, when the forests cast the leaf, And we wept that one so lovely should have a life so brief : Yet not unmeet it was that one, like that young friend of ours, So gentle and so beautiful, should perish with the flowers.

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