The history of British India, Volume 1

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Baldwin, Cradock, and Joy, 1820., 1820 - Hindus
 

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Page 108 - The increase of our revenue is the subject of our care as much as our trade ; 'tis that must maintain our force when twenty accidents may interrupt our trade; 'tis that must make us a nation in India...
Page 425 - ... then the sole self-existing power, himself undiscerned, but making this world discernible, with five elements and other principles of nature, appeared with undiminished glory, expanding his idea, or dispelling the gloom. He, whom the mind alone can perceive, whose essence eludes the external organs, who has no visible parts, who exists from eternity, even he, the soul of all beings, whom no being can comprehend, shone forth in person.
Page 164 - Brahmin springs to light, he is borne above the world, the chief of all creatures, assigned to guard the treasury of duties, religious and civil.
Page 21 - Elizabeth under the name of the Governor and Company of Merchants of London trading to the East Indies.
Page 266 - A village, geographically considered, is a tract of country comprising some hundred or thousand acres of arable and waste lands: politically viewed it resembles a corporation or township. Its proper establishment of officers and servants consists of the following descriptions: the potail, or head inhabitant, who has...
Page 425 - In that egg the great power sat inactive a whole year of the Creator, at the close of which, by his thought alone, he caused the egg to divide itself; and from its two divisions he framed the heaven above and the earth beneath ; in the midst he placed the subtile ether, the eight regions, and the permanent receptacle of waters.
Page 267 - Under this simple form of municipal government, the inhabitants of the country have lived from time immemorial. The boundaries of the villages have been but seldom altered ; and though the villages themselves have been sometimes injured and even desolated by war, famine and disease, the same name, the same limits, the same interests and even the same families, have continued for ages. The inhabitants...
Page 351 - Let him slide backwards and forwards on the ground ; or let him stand a whole day on tiptoe ; or let him continue in motion rising and sitting alternately : but at sunrise, at noon, and at sunset, let him go to the waters and bathe. In the hot season, let him sit exposed to five fires ; four blazing around him, with the sun above : in the rains, let him stand uncovered, without even a mantle, and where the clouds pour the heaviest showers ; in the cold season, let him wear humid vesture ; and let...
Page 426 - He gave being to time and the divisions of time, to the stars also, and to the planets, to rivers, oceans, and mountains, to level plains, and uneven valleys.
Page 268 - The inhabitants gave themselves no trouble about the breaking up and divisions of kingdoms; while the village remains entire, they care not to what power it is transferred, or to what sovereign it devolves; its internal economy remains unchanged.

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