The London polytechnic magazine, and journal of science, literature, and the fine arts, ed. by T. Stone. Jan.-June, 1844

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Thomas Stone
1844
 

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Page 311 - what my dream was. I will get Peter Quince to write a ballad of this dream; it shall be called Bottom's Dream, because it hath no bottom; and I will sing it in the latter end of a play before the Duke.
Page 311 - had. But man is but a patched fool, if he will offer to say what methought I had. The eye of man hath not heard, the ear of man hath not seen
Page 55 - for diffusing the knowledge and facilitating the general introduction of useful mechanical inventions and improvements; and for teaching, by courses of philosophical lectures and experiments, the application of science to the common purposes of life. The investigations and
Page 103 - crying buz, he could take away a man's life, though in truth he could do no such thing, yet this were a just law made by the state, that whosoever should turn his hat thrice, and cry buz, with an intention to take away a man's life, shall be put to death.
Page 311 - I have had a most rare vision ; I have had a dream," says Bottom, " past the wit of man to say what dream it was. Man is but an ass, if he go about to expound this dream.
Page 65 - a topaz and a carbuncle ; the second row an emerald, a sapphire, and a diamond; the third row a ligure, an agate, and an amethyst; and the fourth row a beryl, and an onyx, and a jasper.
Page 305 - earth And see how his stock went on. Over the hill, and over the dale, And he went over the plain ; And backward and forward he switched his long tail, As a gentleman switches his cane.
Page 301 - to be in great plenty, and which bore a fruit in bunches resembling in appearance the currant, with the colour of the plum. " It has a pleasant, although a strongly aromatic taste, exactly resembling mustard; and, if taken in any quantity, produces a similar irritability of the nose and eyes
Page 311 - past the wit of man to say what dream it was. Man is but an ass, if he go about to expound this dream. Methought I was—there is no man can tell what. Methought I was—and methought I had. But man is but a patched fool, if he will offer to say what methought I had. The eye of man hath not heard, the ear of man hath not seen
Page 100 - after giving an account of the Tryals of the NewEngland Witches, gives the following summary of the phenomena they exhibited. He assures us, " That they did in the assembly mutually cure each other even with a touch of the hand, when strangled and otherwise tortured, and would endeavour to get to their afflicted companions to relieve

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