Beautiful butterflies; the British species described and illustrated

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Groombridge and Sons, 5, Paternoster Row, 1854 - 68 pages
 

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Page xvi - CHILD of the sun ! pursue thy rapturous flight, Mingling with her thou lov'st in fields of light; And, where the flowers of Paradise unfold, Quaff fragrant nectar from their cups of gold. There shall thy wings, rich as an evening sky, Expand and shut with silent ecstasy!
Page xxv - While o'er th' enfeebling lute his hand he flung, And to the trembling chords these tempting verses sung: 'Behold, ye pilgrims of this earth, behold! See all but man with unearned pleasure gay ! See her bright robes the butterfly unfold, Broke from her wintry tomb in prime of May. What youthful bride can equal her array? Who can with her for easy pleasure vie?
Page xxiv - Invites the young pursuer near, And leads him on from flower to flower A weary chase and wasted hour, Then leaves him, as it soars on high, With panting heart and tearful eye,: So Beauty lures the full-grown child...
Page 60 - Contrivance intricate express'd with ease, Where unassisted sight no beauty sees, The shapely limb and lubricated joint, Within the small dimensions of a point ; Muscle and nerve miraculously spun, His mighty work who speaks and it is done, The invisible in things scarce seen reveal'd, To whom an atom is an ample field...
Page xvii - A humming bird once met a butterfly, and being pleased with the beauty of its person and the glory of its wings, made an offer of perpetual friendship. I cannot think of it, was the reply, as you once spurned me, and called me a drawling dolt.
Page i - Engravings, price 3s. 6d. BEAUTIFUL BUTTERFLIES. DESCRIBED AND ILLUSTRATED With an Introductory chapter, containing the History of a Butterfly through all its Changes and Transformations. A Description of its Structure in the Larva, Pupa, and Imago states, with an Explanation of the scientific terms used by Naturalists in reference thereto, with observations upon the Poetical and other associations of the Insect.
Page viii - mid the roses lay, She saw a wearied man dismount From his hot steed, and on the brink Of a small imaret's rustic fount Impatient fling him down to drink.
Page 49 - The males usually fly very high, and are only to be taken by a bag-net fixed to the end of a rod twenty or thirty feet long. There have been instances, though very rare, of their settling on the ground, near puddles of water, and being taken there. When the Purple Emperor is within reach, no fly is more easily taken; for he is so very bold and fearless, that he will not move from his settling place until you quite push him off: you may even tip the ends of his wings, and be suffered to strike again.
Page 60 - To trace in Nature's most minute design The signature and stamp of power Divine, Contrivance intricate, expressed with ease, Where unassisted sight no beauty sees, The shapely limb and lubricated joint, Within the small dimensions of a point, Muscle and nerve miraculously spun, His mighty work who speaks and it is done...
Page iii - Lo.! the bright train their radiant wings unfold, With silver fringed, and freckled o'er with gold. On the gay bosom of some fragrant flower, They, idly fluttering, live their little hour ; Their life all pleasure, and their task all play, All spring their age, and sunshine all their day.

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