History of Modern Philosophy from Nicolas of Cusa to the Present Time

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Page 245 - Even if God did not exist, it would be necessary to invent Him, so Voltaire said — 'si dieu n'existait pas, il faudrait 1'inventer.
Page 572 - Evolution is an integration of matter and concomitant dissipation of motion ; during which the matter passes from an indefinite, incoherent homogeneity to a definite, coherent heterogeneity ; and during •which the retained motion undergoes a parallel transformation.
Page 567 - If two or more instances in which the phenomenon occurs have only one circumstance in common, while two or more instances in which it does not occur have nothing in common save the absence of that circumstance, the circumstance in which alone the two sets of instances differ is the effect, or the cause, or an indispenable part of the cause, of the phenomenon.
Page 566 - ... a series of feelings which is aware of itself as past and future; and we are reduced to the alternative of believing that the mind, or Ego, is something different from any series of feelings, or possibilities of them, or of accepting the paradox that something which ex hypothesi is but a series of feelings, can be aware of itself as a series.
Page 117 - Of God, (2) Of the Nature and Origin of the Mind, (3) Of the Origin and Nature of the Affects, (4) Of Human Bondage, or of the Strength of the Affects, (5) Of the Power of the Intellect, or of Human Liberty. By BENEDICT DE SPINOZA. Translated from the Latin by WILLIAM HALE WHITE, los.
Page 578 - has freedom to do all that he wills, provided he infringes not the equal freedom of any other...
Page 71 - A man that hath no virtue in himself ever envieth virtue in others; for men's minds will either feed upon their own good, or upon others...
Page 71 - I CANNOT call Riches better than the baggage of virtue. The Roman word is better, im-pedimenta. For as the baggage is to an army, so is riches to virtue. It cannot be spared nor left behind, but it hindereth the march; yea and the care of it sometimes loseth or disturbeth the victory.
Page 238 - ... that there is life and intelligence in our fellow-men "; "that there is a certain regard due ... to human authority in matters of opinion"; "that, in the phenomena of nature, what is to be, will probably be like what has been in similar circumstances.
Page 411 - All production of material things and their forms must be judged to be possible according to merely mechanical laws.

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