Page images
PDF
EPUB

MESSRS. MACMILLAN &

CLARENDON PRESS

PUBLICATIONS.

In 4to. cloth, price 31. 78.

An ICELANDIC - ENGLISH DIC-
TIONARY, based on the MS. Collections of the late RICHARD
CLEASBY. Enlarged and Completed by G. VIGFUSSON, M.A.
With an Introduction and Life of Cleasby, by G.WEBBE DASENT,
D.C.L. (Part III. completing the Work, 258. now ready.)

This day, in 8vo. price 148.

The LOGIC of HEGEL.

Translated

from the Encyclopedia of the Philosophical Sciences.' By W, WALLACE, M.A., Fellow and Tutor of Merton College. With Prologomena.

Professor JOWETT'S TRANSLATION
With Analysis and Introduction.

of PLATO'S DIALOGUES. 4 vols. 8vo. 31. 38.

A SANSCRIT-ENGLISH DICTION-
ARY. Etymologically and Philologically arranged, with special
reference to Greek, Latin, Gothic, German, Anglo-Saxon, and other
Cognate Indo-European Languages. By MONIER WILLIAMS,
Boden Professor of Sanscrit at Oxford. 4to. 41. 148. 6d.

THE CLARENDON PRESS SERIES.

NEW VOLUMES AND NEW EDITIONS.

A CONSTITUTIONAL HISTORY of
ENGLAND. By W. STUBBS, M.A., Regius Professor of Modern
History at Oxford. Vol. I. crown 8vo. 128.
[Next week,

GENEALOGICAL TABLES,

ILLUS

TRATIVE of MODERN HISTORY. By HEREFORD B.
GEORGE, M.A., Fellow of New College, Oxford. 4to. 128.
[Next week.

LIVY. SELECTIONS for SCHOOLS.
With Notes, &c. By H. LEE-WARNER, M.A., Assistant-Master
in Rugby School. Part I. The Caudine Disaster. Extra feap.
bvo. 1s. 6d.
[Next week.

An ETYMOLOGICAL DICTIONARY

of the FRENCH LANGUAGE. With a Preface on the Principles of French Etymology. By AUGUSTE BRACHET. Translated into English by G. W. KITCHIN, M.A. Crown 8vo. 108. 6d.

"As a mere dictionary to assist the translator of French into English, it is one of the best books an Englishman can use, seeing the information and insight into the language which it affords."-School Board Chronicle.

Mr. E. A. FREEMAN'S HISTORY of SCIENCE PRIMERS for ELEMEN- DRUMMOND of HAWTHORNDEN:

the NORMAN CONQUEST of ENGLAND, its Causes and
Results. Vols. I. and II. Second Edition, with New Index. 8vo.
363. Vol. III. The Reign of Harold, and the Interregnumn. 8vo.
218. Vol. IV. The Reign of William the Conqueror. 8vo. 218.

the Story of his Life and Writings. By Professor MASSON.
With Portrait and Vignette engraved by Jeens. Crown 8vo.
108. 6d.
[This day.
"Around his hero Prof. Masson groups national and
individual episodes and sketches of character, which are
of the greatest interest, and which add to the value of a
biographical work which we warmly recommend to the
lovers of thoroughly healthy books."-Notes and Queries.

SOPHOCLES. With Introductions,

and English Notes. For Schools. Each Play separately. By Professor LEWIS CAMPBELL and EVELYN ABBOTT, M.A. Part I. Edipus Tyrannus. Extra feap. 8vo. 18. 9d.

An ELEMENTARY TREATISE on
QUATERNIONS. By P. G. TAIT, M.A., Professor of Natural
Philosophy in the University of Edinburgh. New and Enlarged
Edition. 8vo. 148.
[Just ready.

& CO.'S
CO.'S PAGE.

CHEMISTRY for STUDENTS. By

A. W. WILLIAMSON, F.R.S., Professor of Chemistry, University
College, London. Third Edition. Extra fcap. 8vo. 88. 6d.

NATURE:

A WEEKLY ILLUSTRATED JOURNAL OF SCIENCE.
The Number for JANUARY 22, 1874, will contain, among other Articles
of interest, a Memoir, on
DIFFRACTION SPECTRUM PHOTOGRAPHY.

By Professor HENRY DRAPER, M.D. of New York.
Illustrated by a Photograph printed by the Albert-type process.
Every Thursday, price 4d.; Yearly Subscription, 18s. 6d.
29, Bedford-street, Strand.

THEOCRITUS.

Notes. By H. SNOW, M.A., Assistant-Master at Eton.
Edition. Extra fcap. 8vo. 48. 6d.

TARY SCHOOLS. Under the joint Editorship of Professors
HUXLEY, ROSCOE, and BALFOUR STEWART.

OXFORD Printed at the CLARENDON PRESS,
And Published by MACMILLAN & CO., London, Publishers to the
University.

Primer of Chemistry. By Prof. Roscoe,

F.R.S. Illustrated. Second Edition. 18mo. 1s.

Primer of Physics. By Prof. Balfour

STEWART, F.R.S. Illustrated. Second Edition. 18mo. 18.

Primer of Physical Geography. By

Prof. GEIKIE, F.R.S. Illustrated. 18mo. 18.

A HISTORY of FRANCE down to the LESSONS in ELEMENTARY BO

YEAR 1453. With many Maps and Tables. By G. W. KITCHIN,
M.A., formerly Censor of Christ Church. Crown 8vo. 108. 6d.

Primer of Physiology. By Michael

FOSTER, F.R.S.

SCIENTIFIC CLASS-BOOKS.

"The great merit of the book is an excellent judgment LESSONS in ELEMENTARY CHE-
in the selection of materials. Mr. Kitchin knows well
what to omit, what to abridge, what to describe at length.
and he knows the proper proportions for a work like this
of dissertation and narrative."-Athenæum.

MISTRY. By Prof ROSCOE. With numerous Illustrations and
Chromo-lithographs of the Solar Spectra. New Edition. 18mo.
48. 6d.

POPULAR ASTRONOMY. With Illus-
trations. By Sir G. B. AIRY, C.B., Astronomer-Royal,
Edition. 1smo. 48. 6d.

New

ELEMENTARY LESSONS in AS

TRONOMY. With Illustrations. By J. NORMAN LOCKYER,
F.R.S. With Coloured Diagram of the Spectra of the Sun, Stars,
and Nebulæ. New Edition. 1smo. 58. 6d.
QUESTIONS on the Same. 18. 6d.

Primer of Geology. By Prof. Geikie, The FAIRY FAMILY: a Series of

F.R.S. Illustrated. 18mo. 18.
In preparation,

Introductory. By Prof. Huxley, F.R.S.
Primer of Botany. By J. D. Hooker,

C.B. F.R.S.

Primer of Astronomy. By J. Norman

LOCKYER, F.R.S.

TANY. With Illustrations. By Prof. OLIVER, F.R.S. F.L.S.
New Edition. 18mo. 48. Gd.

DEDUCTIVE and INDUCTIVE. By Prof. JEVONS. With
copious Questions and Examples, and a Vocabulary of Logical
Terms. New Edition. 18mo. 38. 6d.

LESSONS in ELEMENTARY PHY

By Prof. HUXLEY.

SIOLOGY. With numerous Illustrations.
New Edition. 18mo. 48. 6d.
QUESTIONS on the Same. 18. 6d.
POLITICAL ECONOMY for BEGIN-
NERS. By MILLICENT GARRETT FAWCETT. With Ques-
tions. New Edition. 18mo. 28. 6d.

PASSAGES for TRANSLATION into OWENS COLLEGE JUNIOR Course
LATIN. For the Use of Passmen and others. Selected by J. Y.
SARGENT, M.A. Third Edition. Extra feap. 8vo. 2s. 6d.

LESSONS in ELEMENTARY PHY

SICS. By BALFOUR STEWART, F.R.S., Professor of Natural
Philosophy in Owens College, Manchester. With Coloured Diagram
and numerous Illustrations. New Edition. 18mo. 48. 6d.

NEW BOOKS.

New

For Schools. With ELEMENTARY LESSONS in ANA-
TOMY. By ST. GEORGE MIVART, F.R.S. With upwards of
400 Illustrations. 18mo. 68. 6d.
Other Volumes in preparation.

of PRACTICAL CHEMISTRY. By F. JONES. With Preface
by Prof. ROSCOE. New Edition. 18mo. 2s. 6d.

ETRUSCAN RESEARCHES. By the

Rev. ISAAC TAYLOR, M.A. 8vo.

[Shortly.

SPECIAL EDITION FOR SCHOOLS.-18mo, cloth, 18.

SOPHOCLES. The Greek Text of the ELEMENTARY LESSONS in LOGIC, The CHILDHOOD of the WORLD:

By

By E.

Plays. For the Use of Students in the University of Oxford.
LEWIS CAMPBELL, M.A., Professor of Greek, St. Andrews.
Extra fcap. 8vo. 48. 6d.

A SIMPLE ACCOUNT of MAN in EARLY AGES.
CLODD, F.R.A.S. (Third Edition, crown 8vo. 38.)

A MANUAL of the CHEMISTRY of
the CARBON COMPOUNDS; or, Organic Chemistry. By
C. SCHORLEMMER, F R.S. With Illustrations. 8vo. 148.
[Immediately.

The PRINCIPLES of SCIENCE: a
Treatise on Logic and Scientific Method. By W. STANLEY
JEVONS, M.A. F.R.S., Professor of Logic and Political Economy
in Owens College, Manchester. 2 vols. 8vo.
[Shortly

Ballads and Metrical Tales Illustrating the Fairy Mythology of
Europe. By ARCHIBALD MACLAREN. With Frontispiece,
Engraved Title, and Vignette. Crown 8vo. gilt, 58. [This day.

"Only requires to be known to be highly valued.....A book which is readable from the first to the last, and ought to be highly popular."-Scotsman.

"The verses have true poetic fire, and the tales are well told."-Standard.

Second Edition, with many New Letters,

GOETHE and MENDELSSOHN.

(1821-1531.)

Translated, with Additions, from the German of Dr. KARL MENDELSSOHN, by M. E. VON GLEHN. With 2 Portraits and Fac-simile. Crown 8vo. handsomely bound in cloth extra, 58. This day.

"A very valuable addition to the two volumes of letters published some years ago, as it consists principally of Mendelssohn's own accounts of his different interviews as a boy and man with Goethe."-Globe.

"The volume is most welcome, giving us, as it does, vivid though brief glimpses of the famous musician as a boy, a youth, and a man. But, above all, it gives us a glowing picture of the boy Mendelssohn at Weimer in its golden days."-Standard.

The ACADEMICA of CICERO.

The

Text Revised and Explained by J. S. REID, Assistant-Tutor of
Christ's College, Cambridge. Feap. 8vo. 4s. 6d.
[This day.

NEW VOLUME OF SCIENCE CLASS-BOOKS.
ELEMENTARY LESSONS on
STEAM. By JOHN PERRY, Lecturer on Physics at Clifton
College. With numerous Illustrations. 18mo.
[Shortly.

NEW VOLUME OF "NATURE SERIES." The BIRTH of CHEMISTRY.

By

G. F. RODWELL, F. R.A.S. F.C.S., Science Master in Marlborough College. With numerous Illustrations. Crown 8vo. 38. 6d. [Just ready.

PARALLEL EXTRACTS. Arranged
for Translation into English and Latin, with Notes on Idioms. Ey
J. E. NIXON, M.A., Classical Lecturer, King's College, London.
Part I. Historical and Epistolary. Crown 8vo.
[Shortly.

RULES and EXAMPLES in ALGE-
BRA. By the Rev. T. DALTON, M.A., Assistant-Master at Eton
Crown Svo.
[Shortly.

MACMILLAN & CO. Bedford-street, Strand, London, W.C.

[blocks in formation]

FRENCH
FRONDE to the GREAT REVOLUTION. By HENRY BAR-
TON BAKER. 2 vols. crown 8vo. 218.

Contents.

the

BY MRS. WHITCOMBE.
BYEGONE DAYS in DEVON and

CORNWALL; with Notes of Existing Superstitions and Customs.
By Mrs. HENRY PENNELL WHITCOMBE. In post 8vo. 78. 6d.

NEW AND POPULAR NOVELS.

I.

II.

LITTLE LADY LORRAINE: a Novel.
By COURTENEY GRANT. In 1 vol. crown 8vo. 103. 6d.

III.

MAD DUMARESQ. By Florence

MARRYAT, Author of 'A Love's Conflict,' &c. In 3 vols. crown 8vo. at every Library.

De Retz-The Story of La Vallière-Madame de Sévigné-Madame de Maintenon and the Last Years of Louis the Fourteenth-The Regent Orleans and his Age-The Sisters De Nesles and the Early Years of Louis the Fifteenth-The Marquise de Pompadour and the Middle Age of Louis the Fifteenth-Madame du Barry and the Last Years of Louis the Fifteenth-Marie Antoinette and the Age of Louis the Sixteenth-The Creators of the French Revolution: Mirabeau, Talleyrand, Lafayette-Madame Roland and the Girondists-The Destroyers of

French Revolution: Marat, Danton, Camille Desmoulins, LODGE'S PEERAGE and BARONET

Robespierre.

IV.

NANCY.

By Rhoda Broughton,

Author of Cometh Up as a Flower,' 'Red as a Rose is She,' *Good-bye, Sweetheart,' &c. In 3 vols. crown 8vo. at every Library.

13, Great Marlborough-street.

Also, in a few days,
V.

HURST & BLACKETT'S
NEW WORKS.

BY MR. BARTON BAKER.

VOLS. III. AND IV. OF THE

In One Volume, demy 8vo. cloth extra, 188.

SOCIETY from the HISTORY of TWO QUEENS: Catharine The LAND of the WHITE ELEPHANT:

of ARAGON and ANNE BOLEYN. By W. HEPWORTH DIXON. Demy 8vo. 308. completing the work. [Just ready. SPAIN and the SPANIARDS.

AZAMAT BATUK. 2 vols. 218.

SIGHTS and SCENES in SOUTH-EASTERN ASIA. A Personal Narrative of Travel and Adventure in Farther India, embracing the Countries of Burmah, Siam, Cambodia, and CochinChina (1871-72). By FRANK VINCENT, jun. With Maps, Plans, and numerous Illustrations. [Now ready. "Farther India is still more or less a sealed book to most of us, and one could not desire a more pleasant tutor in fresh geographical lore He won our heart at once by plunging in medias res, instead of devoting a chapter to the outward voyage, and he tells us sensibly and intelligently, in a natural and unaffected style, what he saw and heard........The book is exquisitely got up. The printing is beyond praise, and the numerous illustrations and maps make the book intelligible to the dullest capacity."-John Bull.

"The work presents us with a personal narrative of travel and adventure in farther India, embracing the countries of Birma, Siam, Cambodia, and Cochin-China. Mr. Vincent is an American gentleman, and his travels took place in the years 1-71-72, so that his volume has the great advantage of reflecting the actual existing state of these lands."-Daily News.

WON in a CANTER: a Novel. By

"OLD CALABAR." In 3 vols. crown 8vo.

LIFE OF THE

RT. HON. SPENCER PERCEVAL.

Including his Correspondence.

By HIS GRANDSON, SPENCER WALPOLE.
2 vols. 8vo. with Portrait, 308.

RICHARD BENTLEY & SON, New Burlington-street,
Publishers in Ordinary to Her Majesty.

This work contains Letters from the King, the Prince Regent,
the Dukes of Cumberland, Wellington, Portland, Richmond;
Lords Liverpool, Grenville, Grey, Loughborough, Spencer,
Wellesley, Lonsdale, Castlereagh, Mr. Pitt, Mr. Addington,
Mr. Canning, and other distinguished persons.

BY M. PLON.

The LIFE and WORK of THOR- The LION and the ELEPHANT.

VALDSEN. By EUGÈNE PLON. From the French, by Mrs. CASHEL HOEY. In imperial 8vo. with numerous Illustrations, 258.

"This important biography will at once take rank in our political literature, both as a faithful reflection of the statesman and his period, as also for its philosophic, logical, and dramatic completeness."-Morning Post.

"In Mr. Perceval's biography his grandson has undoubtedly made a valuable addition to our parliamentary history. The book is full of interest."-Daily News

[blocks in formation]

THE NEW NOVELS.
VICTOR and VANQUISHED.

By
COLONEL DACRE. By the Author of

MARY CECIL HAY. 3 vols.

CASTE,' &c. 3 vols.

LORD HARRY BELLAIR: a Novel. TRANSMIGRATION. By Mortimer

COLLINS, Author of Marquis and Merchant.' 3 vols.

By the Author of Mary Powell,' &c. In 2 vols. crown 8vo. at every Library.

CRISSCROSS JOURNEYS. By

WALTER THORNBURY. 2 vols. 21s.

"A lively, graphic, and interesting book."-Daily News.

LIFE of MOSCHELES, with Selections

from his DIARIES and CORRESPONDENCE. By his WIFE.
2 vols. large post 8vo. with Portrait, 248.

AGE for 1874. Under the Especial Patronage of HER MAJESTY,
and Corrected by the Nobility. Containing all the New Creations.
43rd Edition. I vol. with the Arms beautifully engraved, 318. 6d.
bound, gilt edges.
[Just ready.

By

C. J. ANDERSSON, Author of Lake Ngami,' &c. Edited by
L. LLOYD. 8vo. with Illustrations, 158.

By one could not dr.

The EXILES at ST. GERMAINS.

the Author of The Ladye Shakerley.' 1 vol. 78. 6d.
The whole narrative is picturesque, graphic, and entertaining, as
well as moral and pathetic."-Morning Post.

SAM SLICK'S AMERICANS at HOME.

CHEAP EDITION. Illustrated by Sambourne. 58. bound. Form-
ing the New Volume of HURST & BLACKETT'S STANDARD
LIBRARY.

The BLUE RIBBON. By the Author

of St. Olave's,' &c. 3 vols.

"An unquestionably interesting story. We like 'The Blue Ribbon' very much."-Spectator.

"An admirable story. The character of the heroine is original and skilfully worked out, and an interest is cast around her which never flags. The sketches of society in a cathedral city are very vivid and amusing."-Morning Post.

The reader will be both pleased and interested in this story. It abounds in picturesque, healthy dialogue, touches of pathos and quiet good sense, which will surely make it popular."- Standard.

"The very best work the author has yet given us. It is strong in its plot, which is admirably worked out, and careful in discrimination and portraiture of character. It is one of the best novels of the season."-English Independent.

SAMPSON LOW, MARSTON & CO.'S
NEW LIBRARY BOOKS,
To ask for at all Libraries and Booksellers'.

CAPTAIN MARKHAM'S RETURN FROM THE
ARCTIC REGIONS.

By A WHALING CRUISE to BAFFIN'S BAY

and the GULF of BOOTHIA. With an Account of the Rescue, by his Ship, of the Survivors of the CREW of the 'POLARIS'; and a Description of Modern Whale Fishing. Together with numerous Adventures with Bears, &c. By Captain A. H. MARKHAM, R.N. With Introduction by Admiral SHERARD OSBORNE. Demy 8vo. cloth extra, 2 Maps and several Illustrations, 188. [This day. "A narrative of peculiar interest. Captain Markham's work fully and efficiently supplements that of Scoresby, and gives us a very complete idea of the whale fishery of the present day. The chapters on the Middle Ice Fishing are full of sporting incidents, capitally told, and which make the reader feel almost the same enthusiasm as was excited in the mind of the author........The work is profusely illus trated. It will be warmly welcomed by geographers; and all lovers of tales of enterprise and adventure will find entertaining and agreeable reading."-Ocean Highways.

ONE LOVE in a LIFE. By Emma

M. PEARSON, Author of Our Adventures in the War.' 3 vols. The reader will follow with delight Miss Pearson's fascinating pages."-John Bull.

There are many beauties in this story. The tone is elevating, and the descriptions of scenery and society are excellent."-Telegraph.

Important Announcement.

DR. SCHWEINFURTH'S TRAVELS AND DISCOVERIES IN
CENTRAL AFRICA, FROM 1868-71.

LOTTIE DARLING. By J. C. Jeaffre

SON. SECOND EDITION. 3 vols.

The HEART of AFRICA; or, Three Years'
Travels and Adventures in the Unexplored Regions of the Centre
of Africa. Translated by ELLEN E. FREWER. With an Intro-
duction by WINWOOD READE. 2 vols. demy 8vo. of upwards
of 500 pages each, and will be illustrated by about 130 Woodcuts
from Drawings made by the Author, with 2 Maps, price 42s.
[To be published about the 20th instant.

"A capital novel, healthy in tone, interesting from beginning to end,
as sparkling as it is original, as powerful as it is amusing."-Post.
"This story is well told. It opens up a phase of life hitherto un-
touched by any novelist."-Daily News.

SPECIAL NOTICE.-New Work by the Author of 'The Great
Lone Land.' The First Edition being already exhausted, the
Second Edition will be ready in a few days.

CAPTAIN BUTLER'S 'The WILD NORTH
LAND.' Price 188. (not 168. as previously advertised). Second
Edition ready in a few days.

"Captain Butler's volume of travel, adventure, and discovery in the wide regions of the American Continent which lie beyond the limits of civilization, appears very opportunely at this Christmas season. The long winter evenings at bome are just the time when such stirring narratives can be thoroughly enjoyed. The most splendid field for enterprising travel lies within the territory of the British Empire." Daily News. "The love of adventure breathes through every page of his book, and gives it a pleasant flavour of originality."-Saturday Review.

"This is, in many respects, a model book of travel......The volume is profusely and excellently illustrated, and convenient maps add to its value...... But the whole of his book is worth reading, as giving the latest observations of an intelligent traveller over countries that are rapidly changing their characteristics."-Pall Mall Gasette.

NEW

NOVELS.

A CHRONICLE of the FERMORS: Horace
Walpole in Love. By M. F. MAHONY (Matthew Stradling).
Author of The Misadventures of Mr. Catlyn,' 'The Irish Bar-
sinister,' &c. In 2 vols. demy 8vo. with Steel Portrait of Horace
Walpole. Price 248.
[Now ready.

MISTRESS

JUDITH: a Cambridgeshire

Story. By C. C. FRASER-TYTLER, Author of 'Jasmine Leigh." 2 vols. small post 8vo. cloth extra, price 168.

[Now ready at all Libraries. "Its graceful delineations of character, the many truthful and picturesque descriptions of nature scattered over its pages, and the racy talk of its rustics, combine to form a whole of very unusual merit."- Daily News.

"We do not remember ever to have read a story more perfect of its kind than Mistress Judith'; and, since Mrs. Gaskell's 'Sylvia's Lovers,' we have not read a sadder one.. A story from which we would willingly quote could we find where to begin and where to leave off; but which we doubt if a person who felt deeply could ever have borne to tell."-Athenæum.

IN the ISLE of WIGHT. 2 vols. crown [Now ready.

8vo. cloth, 218.

By Mrs. Arnold,

BETTER THAN GOLD.
Author of His by Right,'' John Hesketh's Charge,'' Under Foot,'
&c. 3 vols. crown 8vo. 318. 6d.

BROKEN BONDS. By Hawley Smart, London: SAMPSON LOW, MARSTON, LOW & Searle,
Crown-buildings, 188, Fleet-street.

Author of Breezie Langton,'' False Cards,' &c. 3 vols.

[January 23.

[ocr errors]

JOHN WILKES.

prosecution of Wilkes took place. All the statements on the trial go to show that the Essay was printed in red letter and with a frontispiece and an engraved title. There are many copies in existence now, some of them having lines the same as others, but none that are Wilkes, Sheridan, Fox. By W. F. Rae. printed in red letter, and decorated with a (Isbister & Co.) frontispiece or engraved title. The copy upon SINCE the day when it was preferred as a which Lord Stanhope wrote was printed nine grave charge against Wilkes that "his father years after the trial took place. But setting amassed his fortune by exercising a trade aside all question as to the present existence equally destructive of the health, industry, of a copy of the Essay, we repeat that it is and morals of the people," John Wilkes has now virtually admitted that the Essay was not been a mark for every kind of unwarrantable written by Wilkes at all; and the collapse of abuse; yet we think that, upon examination, this, the gravest of the charges, ought to warn many of the apparently most weighty of the historians against crediting without examinaaccusations that have been brought against tion those charges that are less serious. him prove as worthless as that based upon the only was Wilkes not the author of the Essay, but, as he himself pointed out in his letter to George Grenville, he was not, even upon the false evidence given on the trial, convicted as having been the author of the Essay; but he was convicted for having published that which, except upon the occasion of the trial itself, was never published at all.

Not

fact that his father was a rich distiller:

:

SATURDAY, JANUARY 17, 1874.

LITERATURE

Oh Wilkes! must I repeat this name, And leave the great, the glorious theme Unsung. No, Muse, the lay begin, Inspire me with his native gin. Why it might as well have been remembered in Wilkes's favour, that he did all he could to get rid of the fortune that his father had left him, and with great success, as it has been remembered against him that his father in much earlier years had made money by distilling spirits from grain.

Lord Stanhope, Lord Brougham, Lord Russell, and most of the writers of the present century, have followed the example that Dr. Johnson set in heaping abuse upon the memory of Wilkes. When, a few years ago, a critic attempted in our columns to clear his memory from some of the most scandalous of the charges that had been made against him, it was said that he had "written as an advocate rather than as a judge "; but when grave historians, whose position should have placed them above prejudice, wrote as party pamphleteers against the most popular man of the latter half of the last century, it was difficult to arrive at or even to approach the truth, except by contending against the exaggerations and falsehoods which interest and passion have raised and perpetuated against Wilkes. Junius, who was no blind admirer of Wilkes, put the matter in the right light when he said, "the question to the public is, where shall we find a man who with purer principles will go the lengths and run the hazards that he has done? The season calls for such a man, and he ought to be supported."

As for the immorality of Wilkes's private life, can we go further than Wilkes went himself when he wrote these words?-"I do not mean, sir, to be impertinent enough to the public, whom I respect, to descend to those particulars of private life; the frailties of which I have repented, I will not justify." As for the charge of having written the Essay upon Women,' that charge, at all events, has now been given up. It is as clear as is any fact in history, that whoever wrote the Essay, Wilkes, at all events, did not. Wilkes himself stated at the time "that the most vile blasphemies were forged and published" as quotations from the work, and it is these vile blasphemies that are in existence now. Lord Stanhope, who attacked Wilkes as being for certain the author of the Essay, had not only never seen it, but he based his condemnation upon the examination of an essay of a different kind-not even the Essay upon which the

The facts relating to the trial ought to have been, and we think, at the time were, far more damaging to the Government than to Wilkes. The real prosecutor was the King himself, for the prosecution took place contrary to the advice of the responsible minister. The wish was to damage in the eyes of the public the writer of the North Briton.

The evidence produced in support of the case for the prosecution was partly evidence illegally obtained under a general warrant, and partly the evidence of a man bribed to confess himself a thief. On the other hand, we owe to Wilkes and his friends the abolition, or rather the declaration of the illegality of those general warrants.

We referred just now to the private character of Wilkes as having nothing to do with the political controversies that raged round his name; but even here it is worth remark, that while he lived unhappily with his wife, it is clear that he was one of the best of fathers; that his statement in a letter to Junius in 1771, when he was only forty-four years of age, "I live very much at home, happy in the elegant society of a sensible daughter," was literally true; and his daughter herself, a woman of high conduct, seems to have found her mother as unamiable a person as even her father did, and in her will gave directions that she should be buried, not by her, but by his side.

These remarks have been suggested to us by the publication of an admirable defence of Wilkes and of the other leaders of the opposition under George the Third, by Mr. Rae, the clever author of 'Westward by Rail.' His three biographies are written in a style which is both brilliant and pleasant, and will interest the general reader, while they do not add much that is really new to the knowledge of the student. In his Wilkes essay, Mr. Rae touches on the Junius controversy, but avoids it; although he speaks of the notion of the day, that Wilkes was the author, as "mistaken," and indicates an opinion favourable to Lord Temple's claims, by saying that not enough attention has been given to them. Surely, however, Mr. William James Smith gave attention enough to Lord Temple's claims in editing the Grenville Papers.

Wilkes was generally supposed to be Junius up to December, 1769. There are many incidental facts which favour this supposition. The collected edition of the North Briton,' published in 1763, is dedicated "to the English nation by Englishmen." The collected edition of Junius, in 1773, is dedicated "to the English nation," and the letters are said to be "written by one of yourselves." There is a certain similarity of style between Wilkes and Junius, but we agree with Mr. Rae On that Wilkes was probably not Junius. the other hand, we distinctly differ from him when he indicates a leaning to Lord Temple's claims. Every fact, incident, conjecture, and speculation that could possibly be adduced to strengthen the opinion that Lord Temple was Junius has been dealt with by Mr. Smith in the essay prefixed to the Grenville Papers. The only bit of real proof that Mr. Smith attempted was that which rested upon the letters marked "Anonymous" by George Grenville being letters of Junius-this fact being made out from a similarity of handwriting and the signature "C." But it has been shown that there were dozens of persons writing at the time with the signature of “C,” and there is no more reason to suppose that the "C" of the anonymous Grenville letters was Junius, than to suppose that he was one of the rejected "C.'s" of the Public Advertiser's notices to correspondents, inasmuch as this rejected "C." dated from the place where Lord Temple lived. As for handwriting, fifty persons have been "proved to be Junius" by comparison of handwriting. One of the great arguments against Lady Temple having been the amanuensis of Lord Temple in connexion with the writing of those letters is, that Junius corresponded with several of Lord and Lady Temple's intimate friends, to whom her handwriting must have been perfectly well known. The impossibility that Lord and Lady Temple could have been Junius without employing an agent in London who must have been entrusted with the truth and with a large amount of responsibility as to the dates of the appearance of the letters, is another strong argument against the theory. The most tremendous obstacle to the theory is, however, the want of genius on the part of the Temples, who, though individuals of considerable ability, were persons of an ability of a wholly different kind from that of Junius, and totally wanting in the vigour for which_that writer is distinguished. A scrap-book of Lady Temple, which was in the possession of Mr. Smith, gives evidence against the Temple theory almost as strong as that of the dates. Lady Temple began pasting into this book cuttings from the Public Advertiser in 1768, and she continued her cuttings there in 1769. A list of the cuttings that she made shows that, as acting either for herself or Lord Temple, she wished to retain everything bearing upon Wilkes, but as regards Junius, she cut out only the strongest of the avowed letters, but none of the miscellaneous letters, even of those the Junius authorship of which is certain; which shows that, supposing she acted of her own motion, she had strong opposition feelings, but no knowledge of the subject.

Again, Lord Temple quarrelled with Wilkes in November, 1769, and they never spoke afterwards, whereas Junius opened personal

communication with Wilkes in August, 1771. Junius, also, attacked Lord Grafton for quarrelling with Wilkes long after Lord Temple had quarrelled with Wilkes. We go further, and maintain that Lord Temple did not even know who Wilkes was. Counsellor Darell was Lord Temple's lawyer. He supplied Junius with his legal information. According to a well-informed writer in the Gentleman's Magazine for February, 1831, the very legal citations "were sent by him from Stowe to Mr. Woodfall." At a later date they were sent to Junius through Wilkes, who was a great friend of Darell's. We may add, that we have before us as we write a confession by Mr. Smith, the learned and painstaking editor of the Grenville Papers, couched in the following terms: "Alas! for the one thing needful-the one proof! I have none; not a shadow of a proof. If I have been led into any too confident expressions, I shall regret them. I have only endeavoured to do what most of my predecessors have done-'make out a case. Mr. Rae has not "endeavoured to make out a case," but he has indicated his belief in a that has never been "made out." On the whole, however, we not only agree with Mr. Rae's conclusions, but are grateful to him for having produced an interesting, a truthful, and a wholesome book.

127

66

""

case

Fantis being as superior in size and strength to the Ashantis as they are inferior in courage. The Fanti kingdom has for some years past been broken up, and consists now of a host of petty states loosely confederated. The principal states in the Fanti country are Cape Coast, Anamaboe, Abra, Dunquah, Dominassie, Mankessan, and Ajimaccoo. Besides the Fantis there are five large independent tribes in the Protectorate, namely, the Assims, the Akims, the Aquapims, the Wassaws, and the Denkeras, besides other smaller tribes, such as the Apollonias, the Ahantis, Tufels, Elminas, AcApollonias, the Ahantis, Tufels, Elminas, Accras, and Kroboes. Save under the pressure of a common danger, none of the six large and the other smaller tribes ever act together, their only tie in ordinary times being the socalled British protection. The Ashantis are, however, more interesting to us at present than the protected tribes, and Sir John Dalrymple Hay gives a brief but valuable sketch of the growth of the nation :-"When the Moslem invasion of Western Europe was stemmed, and the Christians re-asserted their superiority in Spain, the Moors turned the tide of conquest towards Central Africa, and on the banks of the long mysterious Quorra, or Niger, established their seat of empire at Timbuctoo. They advanced gradually to the Kong mountains, pushing before them the aboriginal race tains, pushing before them the aboriginal race of Central Africa, and having driven them into the low-lying countries between the Kong mountains and the sea, the tide of Mahometan conquest expended itself in establishing the kingdom of Gaman." Among these aboriginal tribes were the Ashantis, whose capital was, about the year 1700, fixed at Coomassie, by Osai Tutu, who, being able to bring 60,000 warriors into the field, conquered or brought under tribute the whole of the Protectorate, except Denkera, and the districts lying between Ashanti proper and the Kong mountains. Denkera soon ceased to be an exception, and, after a bloody war, acknowledged the supremacy of Ashanti. The history of Ashanti for many years is one constant narrative of unsuccessful efforts on the part of feudatory states to shake off the yoke of their suzerain, varied by wars between Ashanti and the rival power of Dahomey. At the beginning of the present century, the Ashantis first came into contact with us through an invasion of Fanti territory. This inroad took place in 1807, and from that time till the present date, excepting the fifteen years during which Capt. Maclean was Governor of Cape Coast Castle, a state of war, more or less active, has prevailed.

ASHANTI.

Ashanti and the Gold Coast, and what we Know of it: a Sketch. By Vice-Admiral Sir John Dalrymple Hay, Bart. (Stanford.) Fanti and Ashanti. By Capts. H. Brackenbury and J. L. Huyshe. (Blackwood & Sons.)

VERY little is known even now about the Gold Coast and the Ashantis, though we have been at war with the latter for nearly a year. Many works have been published from time to time on the subject, but till the other day they were, for the most part, buried in the dust and oblivion of the back shelves of public libraries, or the remote corners of the stalls of those who deal in second-hand books. During the past six months our newspapers have been filled with discursive essays and scraps of information about Fantis and Ashantis; but few, save professional journalists or lecturers, have mastered and digested the facts stated. The two books before us, therefore, most opportunely supply a crying want; and it is not too much to say that it is the fault of the reader if he rises from a perusal of them without, at all events, a fair outline knowledge of the theatre of war, and of both our allies and foes. The authors, moreover, trace in a clear manner the history of our dealings at different times with the Ashanti nation. The public is in the habit of speaking of the whole of the tribes in the British Protectorate as Fantis; but this is an error. The Fantis constitute only a small portion of the protected tribes. The Fantis occupy the country "included nearly within the curvature of the River Prah, and touch the Wassaws on the west, the Assines on the north, the Aquapans on the east, and on the south the sca-coast." They were originally, it is stated, of the same race as the Ashantis; but the marked physical differences between the two nations seem to negative this supposition, the

It will be remarked by the reader of the two books before us, first, that Ashanti wars generally last a long time; secondly, that we have never yet established among the Ashantis a conviction that our military power is irresistible. In both books there is much valuable information concerning the nature of the country, the mode of fighting, and the relations between us and the Fantis. In short, the works are what they aim at being, popular handbooks to the Gold Coast.

CAUSES CÉLÈBRES.

A Collection of Reports of Celebrated Trials,
Civil and Criminal. Edited by W. O.
Woodall. Vol. I. (Shaw & Sons.)
IT will not surprise Mr. Woodall to learn that
we hesitate to say whether his book should be

judged as a work for the criminal advocate or as a performance for the general reader. Indeed, he seems to share our uncertainty on this point, and throughout his labours to have been in doubt whether he were writing for the lawyers or the laity. In his Preface he says: "My object in preparing this volume of reports is simply to present, for the use of the profession generally, in a convenient form, a collection of some of the more important and interesting trials of modern date"; and in the body of his publication he inserts a report of the trial of Frère Léotade, "with a view of rendering the case of Léotade more generally known to English readers." It accords with this uncertainty of purpose, that whilst he in some places burdens his narratives with details which none but lawyers will care to peruse, he in other places, out of regard for the taste and morals of the drawing-room, is reticent about matters that should be mentioned frankly and precisely in a work for professional inquirers. Under the circumstances, we may fairly assume that his interest in curious trials having been roused by the cause célèbre which is slowly coming to an end in Westminster Hall, Mr. Woodall resolved to make a collection of famous causes which should entertain the public whilst being of service to legal practitioners; and that having lost heart for his undertaking, on seeing its magnitude and several difficulties, he has thrown into a volume such few materials as he had gathered for a grand achievement. The vague promise of the "Vol. I." on his title page may be regarded as a convenient form of apology rather than an expression of serious intention. Many years will probably pass before the appearance of "Vol. II." Anyhow, the present result of the compiler's labours is not likely to bring him any encouragement to continue them. Comprising six cases, five from English records and one from the criminal annals of France, the volume opens with the proceedings taken in 1817 and 1818 against Abraham Thornton for the murder of Mary Ashford, which gave occasion for the enactment of 59 Geo. 3. c. 46, abolishing appeals of murder and wager of battel. The story of the girl's mysterious death, and its ludicrous consequences, is so familiar to legal practitioners, that Mr. Woodall can scarcely have imagined them in need of further instruction on the affair, or on the ancient law, which it rendered laughable. Every law-student has smiled over Blackstone's description of the judicial combat, and knows half-a-score books that set forth the facts of the Erdington tragedy, and the ensuing farce in the King's Bench. So far as the lawyers are concerned, Mr. Woodall deserves no thanks for seventy-four pages on the stale subject. Nor was it needful for him to remind the general reader of incidents which, having more than fifty years since produced a mass of popular literature, have in later time been repeatedly re-told in magazines and newspapers. No comparatively recent tale of crime or disaster has found a larger number of effective narrators than this story of a servantgirl, whose diminutive and spiritless brother dared not face her supposed murderer in a fair fight-for truth and justice. It may be found in the Old Stories Re-told,' which Mr. Thornbury wrote hastily for All the Year Round, and republished as a separate volume. Mr. Thornbury's version is not severely accu

rate. Indeed, he was guilty of a droll mistake when he assumed that the processes of "appeal" and "battel" had their origin in some "rusty old Act of Parliament." But, treating the familiar subject in his peculiar style, he produced a paper that is superior to Mr. Woodall's longer chapter.

revelation he withholds the fact which makes the crime worthy of recollection. Like our present Claimant's case, the case of Thomas Provis was a drama of two acts. Opening with a civil suit, it closed with a criminal prosecution; and it was attended with several circumstances which the proceedings in the later cause célèbre could not fail to bring to recollection. The impostor's counsel in the civil action was the same lawyer who, as Chief Justice of the Common Pleas, presided at the civil trial of the Tichborne case. Provis had no sooner broken down utterly in crossexamination, than Mr. Bovill deemed it incumbent on his honour to throw up his brief, and cease to fight for an obvious impostor. It is, moreover, worthy of remembrance that the forger and fraudulent claimant was under the impression that he had not committed legal forgery in fabricating the spurious signatures of a dead man.

the jury, after a few minutes' deliberation, re-
turned a verdict of guilty both of forgery and of
the uttering, and the prisoner then received the
well-merited sentence of twenty years' trans-

portation."

Jumping from 1818 to 1833, over years fruitful of famous trials on which he might have worked advantageously, Mr. Woodall gives us the prosecution of Josiah Phillips for publishing a libellous account of Sellis's murderous attack on the Duke of Cumberland

and subsequent suicide. A worse selection it would be difficult to imagine. Bad on several

grounds, it is execrably bad on the score of taste and decency. The case presented no feature of legal interest, and is memorable only from the rank of the person to whose pain and discredit the libeller revived certain odious and groundless suspicions. All that

the defending counsel could do for his client was to question the discretion of his professional opponents, and to argue that SO august a personage as His Royal Highness was imprudent and forgetful of his dignity when he put the law in action against his defamers. In the first instance, the libel was penned to

money.

alleged to have been given to the claimant by Dials. Of course the claimant had a story of Robert Smith, the notorious miser of the Seven the considerations for, and the circumstances under which the deceased miser had given first an I. O. U. and then the promissory note. But the executor declined, on sufficient grounds, to the gratify private malignity and the vulgar which the Rev. William Bailey was worsted A civil action ensued, in appetite for scandal against people of rank. It would be absurd to suggest that Mr. Woodall had any personal or even unamiable motive in fishing up this almost forgotten business; but its appearance in his book will please only those whom no writer should wish to please. The other English cases are those of Tawell the murderer, the Rev. William Bailey the forger, and Thomas Provis the forger and impostor, who, just twenty years since, proclaimed himself the son of Sir Hugh Smyth, and heir to that baronet's large estate. Told for the public rather than the profession, the report of the murderer's trial is, upon the whole, a creditable piece of work, though, in his care for the ladies, the reporter is not sufficiently mindful for the lawyers. Mr. Woodall alludes to the culprit's confession; but in forbearing to state its one important

"In his defence," says Mr. Woodall, "he made a long rambling speech, raising what he deemed to be a point of law, that a man could not be convicted of forging the name of a person who was dead. This objection the judge, Mr. Russell Gurney, who, in consequence of the sudden death of Mr. Justice Talfourd, was presiding at the trial, overruled, and

At the assizes which disposed of the pre-
tensions of Sir Hugh Smyth, alias Tom
hundreds of fools who had shown their respect
Provis, to the unqualified astonishment of the
for him by lending him money for the prose
cution of fraudulent claims, a man named
Castro was also put on his trial.

Woodall's selections; for whilst it presents
Bailey's case is the most fortunate of Mr.
several points that deserve consideration, it
has slipped from the general memory. A clergy-
man of the Church of England, and Incum-
bent of St. Peter's Chapel, Queen's Square,
Westminster, the Rev. William Bailey, just
thirty-one years since, claimed from an exe-
cutor 2,875l., in payment of a promissory note

Per

and completely discredited. Then came the
conviction and transportation for life.
criminal trial, that resulted in the culprit's
conviction and transportation for
haps the most remarkable feature of this ex-
traordinary case was the reckless daring with
which the baffled cheat, in the interval between
for use at the approaching criminal investiga-
the two trials, endeavoured to suborn evidence

tion.

666

at the criminal trial.
"My name is Bryant Kearney,' said one witness
'I sell fruit in the streets.
Some time since, I was selling fruit in Brompton
Road; I think about the 1st October last. The
prisoner, who up to that time was a perfect
stranger, came up and asked me how I was getting
on. I told him I got on the best I could, but bad
was the best. He then asked me if I knew any
then said he had lately been engaged in a lawsuit,
thing about the law. I told him I did not. He
which he had lost, because the opposite party had
three witnesses and he only two. He asked me if
I would be a witness for him. I said I would.'"

66

The desperate rogue gave the costermonger a shilling as earnest," and arranged to pay him 301. for his false testimony. But before the time for perjury came, the imperfectly virtuous costermonger decided to speak and earn his money on the side of justice and social order.

MR. BIRKS'S ETHICS.

First Principles of Moral Science: a Course of
Lectures delivered in the University of
Cambridge. By T. R. Birks. (Macmillan
& Co.)

THE Rev. Thomas Rawson Birks is, our readers
may be aware, Knightbridge Professor of Moral
Philosophy in the University of Cambridge,
and in that capacity appears to have delivered,
in October and November 1872, a course of
thirteen lectures, upon the "Certainty and
Dignity of Moral Science, its Spiritual Geo-
graphy, or relation to other main subjects of
human thought, and its Formative Prin-
ciples, or some elementary truths on which
its whole development must depend." To
this "small sheaf of first-fruits" he has also

"ventured to append" a college prize essay, written just forty years ago, and delivered in Trinity College Chapel in December 1833; and, in fine, he "commits the work to the strong, nothing is holy, the only Fountain of blessing of Him, without whom nothing is moral insight and true wisdom, the uncreated dwells in its perfect fullness, from whom its and eternal Goodness, in whom all truth streams proceed, and to whom they return, after watering the wide universe of moral being through which they flow."

predecessors, we took up the volume with Considering who have been Mr. Birks's some interest, hoping to find in it, if not any distinctly new ideas, yet, at any rate, a

new and fresh treatment of old and familiar

subjects. We were anxious, for instance, to
know what Mr. Birks might have to say ex
cathedra about "the doctrine of utility," or
about "the true place of moral science," or
about "the certainty of moral truth." None
of these three great questions has been as yet
ticipated the remarks of the Knightbridge
altogether exhausted; and upon each we an-
Professor with a certain degree of curiosity.
after diligent study, we find ourselves alto-
It may be our own fault; but we confess that,
gether unable to discover what is or what is

not the Professor's view, either upon these
properly calls "those great questions which
points or upon any other of what he very
give birth to rival schools of ethical teaching,
and have perplexed and divided the judg-
ments of moralists for thousands of years.'
Not that the Professor does not take a suf-
has to expound.
ficiently exalted view of the science which he

66

[ocr errors]

Ethics, then," he assures us, "in one word is the Science of Ideal Humanity. It sets before us Man, not as he is, but as he ought to be. It implies a standard of right and wrong, which does mankind, and is not fixed by past experience, but not depend on the actual state and conduct of which shines out amidst the storm-clouds of human passions and vices like a rainbow of hope and promise, pointing onward to something bright, science of Ideal Humanity is the true mainspring excellent and glorious, not yet attained. This of human progress, which really deserves the name. And it forms also the natural transition to the best and highest field of human thought, Divine Theology. The connexion is no mere result of fancy, or philosophical reasoning. It is inwoven into the very texture of Christian faith. which the whole fabric of the Christian revelation For this is the grand 'mystery of godliness,' on depends, that the ideal Man is no other than the

Incarnate Son of God."

All this is very well-very re-assuring. But about "conscience" or the "moral sense"? Is it innate, or connate, or acquired? Is it simple and primary, or is it the product of association? If it be a "form" only, whence are we are we to get its concrete contents ? How far has it been adequately described by Shaftes bury, by Hutcheson, by Butler, by Kant? These are the kind of questions upon which— pace Birks-we should have expected a Knightbridge Professor of Moral Philosophy to dwell. Instead of this we find-and most sound and wholesome doctrine it is-that " an awakened conscience, fully alive to the claims of duty, which looks up with reverence to a law it cannot alter and is bound to obey, is the first essential of true morality, the only genuine passport to the temple of ethical science. Where this is absent, learned specu

« PreviousContinue »