Synonyms Discriminated: A Dictionary of Synonymous Words in the English Language, Illustrated with Quotations from Standard Writers

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Henry Holt, 1893 - English language - 781 pages
 

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Page 625 - Hearken, my beloved brethren, Hath not God chosen the poor of this world rich in faith, and heirs of the kingdom which he hatli promised to them that love him ? 6 But ye have despised the poor.
Page 639 - When I was yet a child, no childish play To me was pleasing ; all my mind was set Serious to learn and know, and thence to do What might be public good; myself I thought Born to that end, born to promote all truth, All righteous things...
Page 627 - A multitude like which the populous North Poured never from her frozen loins to pass Rhene or the Danaw, when her barbarous sons Came like a deluge on the South, and spread Beneath Gibraltar to the Libyan sands.
Page 475 - HAPPINESS ! our being's end and aim ! Good, Pleasure, Ease, Content ! whate'er thy name: That something still which prompts th' eternal sigh, For which we bear to live, or dare to die, Which still so near us, yet beyond us lies...
Page 130 - How now, Horatio? you tremble and look pale; Is not this something more than fantasy? What think you on 't? Hor. Before my God, I might not this believe Without the sensible and true avouch Of mine own eyes.
Page 121 - If I forget thee, 0 Jerusalem, let my right hand forget her cunning. If I do not remember thee, let my tongue cleave to the roof of my mouth ; If I prefer not Jerusalem above my chief joy.
Page 94 - Our eyelids: other creatures all day long Rove idle, unemployed, and less need rest; Man hath his daily work of body or mind Appointed, which declares his dignity, And the regard of heaven on all his ways; While other animals unactive range, And of their doings God takes no account.
Page 416 - Ye friends to truth, ye statesmen who survey The rich man's joys increase, the poor's decay, 'Tis yours to judge, how wide the limits stand Between a splendid and a happy land.
Page 196 - Hebrew, and by that means are not understood once in a twelvemonth. In the poetical quarter, I found there were poets who had no monuments, and monuments which had no poets.
Page 198 - ... thereby to make up pleasant pictures and agreeable visions in the fancy; judgment, on the contrary, lies quite on the other side, in separating carefully one from another ideas wherein can be found the least difference, thereby to avoid being misled by similitude and by affinity to take one thing for another.

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