Hindostan: Its Landscapes, Palaces, Temples, Tombs : the Shores of the Red Sea : and the Sublime and Romantic Scenery of the Himalaya Mountains, Illustrated in a Series of Views Drawn by Turner, Stanfield, Prout, Cattermole, Roberts, Allom, Etc. from Original Sketches by Robt. Elliot & Geo. Francis White

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Page 46 - Baird's army found, to their great astonishment, in Egypt. The occurrence of these caves in one peculiar portion of the peninsula, and upon ground exclusively occupied by the Mahrattas, render the supposition that they were the work of some great people, insulated from the rest of the world, and whose existence has been forgotten in the lapse of ages, very probable. This empire must have lasted...
Page 102 - Abbey is extremely circumscribed, but good fires will impart a glow of genial warmth and comfort to the weather-bound, and whenever the sky clears up, the most beautiful effects are visible in the scenery either wholly or partially unveiled by the sunbeams breaking through the clouds. A lover of nature, domiciled in one of these altitudes, will always find something to interest and engage the attention, in the numerous changes which take place in different states of the atmosphere, giving endless...
Page 68 - ... bounded on either side by the Jumna and the Ganges, which, at the distance of forty miles apart, pursue their tortuous career, until their silvery traces are lost in the meeting skies. After winding for several hundred miles in a southeasterly direction, these beautiful rivers unite, the Jumna throwing itself into the Ganges at Allahabad, thus enclosing a very extensive tract of country called the Doaab, and by their fertilizing waters rendering it one of the most productive districts in India....
Page 1 - I have beheld nearly all the celebrated scenery of Europe, which poets and painters have immortalized, and of which all the tourists in the world are enamoured ; but I have seen it surpassed in these unfrequented and almost unknown regions.
Page 64 - KURSALEE. This village, which is well built, and which stands at the height of seven thousand eight hundred and sixty feet above the sea-level, is one of the largest of the class usually found in the Himalaya, consisting of at least thirty houses, with a population amounting to nearly three hundred persons. It is seated on a plain of considerable dimensions on the left bank of the rocky ravine which forms the channel of the Jumna, surrounded by an amphitheatre of mountains piled one upon another,...
Page 82 - THE point at which the sacred waters of the Ganges enter the plains of Hindostan is supposed to be peculiarly holy, and Hurdwar, the gate of Hari, or Vishnoo, has been from time immemorial the resort of Hindoo pilgrims, hurrying to fling themselves into the mighty stream at the moment of its emancipation from the mountain-range whence it has its source. The scenery about Hurdwar affords some of the most splendid landscapes which are to be found on the bright and beautiful river, whose majestic course...
Page 99 - Balespoor rajah usually appeared seated on a remarkably tall elephant, in a large howdah overlaid with plates of solid silver glistening in the sun, and covered with a pointed dome-like canopy of scarlet, supported on four silver pillars richly embossed. He wore a large white conical turban; and...
Page 75 - They say that the city in some parts exhibits such a wild waste of ruin, that it seems scarcely credible that so much destruction could have been effected by man's neglect in the ordinary course of time, but rather that some violent convulsion of nature must have caused this mighty, terrible, yet partial devastation. And this idea seems to be borne out by the numberless beautiful and massive remains which have escaped the fearful havoc, and which, still exhibiting the noblest specimens of architecture,...
Page 21 - These cairns being destitute of an inscription, it is impossible to say who the adventurous architects were, since no European name has any chance of being retained in its primitive form by a native. The next point of great interest is the summit of a ridge whence the first view of the Ganges is obtained ; a sight which never fails to raise the drooping spirits of the Hindoo followers, and which excites no small degree of enthusiasm in the breast of the Christian travellers.

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