The History of England: As Well Ecclesiastical as Civil, Volume 6

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Page 151 - Holland, before he had overcome, and whilft his fortune yet depended upon the ifiue of a battle which the earl of Warwick was ready to give him. In a word, he was ever victorious in all the battles wherein he fought in perfon. Edward died the 9th of April in the 42d year of his age, after a reign of 22 years and one month.
Page 432 - When men were outlawed in personal actions, they would not permit them to purchase their charters of pardon, except they paid great and intolerable sums ; standing upon the strict point of law, which upon outlawries giveth forfeiture of goods; nay, contrary to all law and colour, they maintained the king ought to have the half of men's lands and rents, during the space of full two years, for a pain in case of outlawry. They would also ruffle with jurors, and enforce them to find as they would direct,...
Page 299 - It stated, that if thieves, murderers, or robbers, registered as sanctuary-men, should sally out, and commit fresh nuisances, which they frequently did, and enter again, in such cases they might be taken out of their sanctuaries by the King's officers. That as for debtors, who had taken sanctuary to defraud their creditors, their persons only should be protected ; but their goods, out of sanctuary, should be liable to seizure. As for traitors, the King was allowed to appoint tbem keepers in their...
Page 151 - Ihe would not ftir from the church but when he fent for her.—What is moft aftonifliing in the life of this prince is his good fortune, which feemed to be prodigious. He was raifed to the throne, after the lofs of two battles, one by the duke his father, the other by the Earl of Warwick, who was devoted to the houfe of York. The head of the father was ftill upon the walls of York, when the fon was proclaimed in London. Edward efcaped, as it were, by miracle, out of his confinement at Middleham.
Page 299 - That as for debtors, who had taken sanctuary to defraud their creditors, their persons only should be protected'; but their goods, out of sanctuary, should be liable to seizure. As for traitors, the king was allowed to appoint them keepers in their sanctuaries to prevent their escape. Long before this, these privileged places had become great evils, and Henry VII. had applied to the pope for a reformation ; but could obtain only what is here stated, which was confirmed by Alexander VI.
Page 174 - ... affected to believe, that St. Peter himself had miraculously consecrated the place of her refuge. He therefore acceded to this point; but urged such reasons, and persuasions, as finally induced the unhappy Queen to comply with his request So, suddenly resolving to give up the young prince, she...
Page 292 - October, with an army of twenty-five thousand foot and sixteen hundred horse, which he put under the command of the Duke of Bedford and the Earl of Oxford ; but...
Page 240 - It lay there two days expofed to public view, and then was buried without farther ceremony. Richard's crown being found by one of...
Page 308 - ... brought back this Anfwer to King Charles, he took Occafion to tell them, ' That for his ' Part, he was very defirous of Peace, as plainly ap* peared by the Propofal he had made ; but that he

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