Small Books on Great Subjects, Volume 1

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Lea and Blanchard, 1846 - Philosophy

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Page 67 - Lord, the half of my goods I give to the poor; and if I have done any wrong to any man, I restore fourfold.
Page 26 - And Jacob awaked out of his sleep, and he said, 'Surely the Lord is in this place; and I knew it not.' "And he was afraid, and said, 'How dreadful is this place! This is none other but the house of God, and this is the gate of heaven.
Page 26 - Jacob vowed a vow, saying, If God will be with me, and will keep me in this way that I go, and will give me bread to eat, and raiment to put on, so that I come again to my father's house in peace; then shall the LORD be my God: and this stone, which I have set for a pillar, shall be God's house: and of all that thou shalt give me I will surely give the tenth unto thee.
Page 26 - And Jacob rose up early in the morning, and took the stone that he had put for his pillows, and set it up for a pillar, and poured oil upon the top of it.
Page 69 - that God is no respecter of persons, but that in every nation he that feareth him and worketh righteousness is accepted with him.
Page 42 - The figure of the deceased person never appeared to me after the first dreadful day ; but several other figures showed themselves afterwards very distinctly ; sometimes such as I knew, mostly, however, of persons I did not know...
Page 36 - ... the most effectual modes of controlling or preventing it The best view of it we find is that given by the Rev. J. Barlow, late Secretary of the Royal Institution, in a small work " On Man's Power over Himself to Prevent or Control Insanity." The principal position contended for by this author is, " that the difference between sanity and insanity consists in the degree of self-control exercised by the individual.
Page 45 - During one part of this disease, after the disappearance of this stationary phantom, I had a very singular and amusing imagery presented to me. It appeared as if a number of objects, principally human faces or figures, on a small scale, were placed before me, and gradually removed, like a succession of medallions. They were all of the same size, and appeared to be all situated at the same distance from the face.
Page 42 - I observed these phantoms with great accuracy, and very often reflected on my previous thoughts, with a view to discover some law in the association of ideas, by which exactly these or other figures might present themselves to the imagination.
Page 42 - I afterwards endeavoured, at my own pleasure, to call forth phantoms of several acquaintance, whom I for that reason represented to my imagination in the most lively manner, but in vain. For, however accurately I pictured to my mind the figures of such persons, I never once could succeed in my desire of seeing them externally; though I had some short time before seen them as phantoms, and they had perhaps afterwards unexpectedly presented themselves to me in the same manner.

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