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THIS NUMBER CONTAINS SEVEN SHEETS.

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TABLE OF CONTENTS.

Page.

I. THE MODERN FRENCH JUDICATURE.—By an American in Paris 1

II. EMILY PLATER, THE Polish HEROINE

23

Life of the Countess Emily Plater. ` Translated by J. K.

Salomonski, a Polish Exile.

III. THE STARS THAT HAVE SET IN THE NINETEENTH CENTURY.-

No.IV.-SCHILLER

34

IV. A DREAM

41

V. LINES

43

VI. Carlin's NORTH AMERICAN INDIANS

44

Letters and Notes on the Manners, Customs, and Condition

of the North American Indians. By George Catlin, $c.

VII. ON THE INFLUENCE OF PROTECTIVE DUTIES ON THE MANUFAC-

TURING PROSPERITY OF A COUNTRY

VIII, ANDREW JACKSON

IX. THE GYPSIES

58

The Zincali; or an Account of the Gypsies of Spain. By

Geo. Borrow, late Agent of the Brit. and For. Bible

Society in Spain.

X. LINES IN A BALL ROOM

68

XI. LINES.—“This is not thy rest."

69

XII. THE RHODE ISLAND QUESTION

70

XIII. A LEGEND OF LIFE AND LOVE

83

xxxi.

XIV. POLITICAL PORTRAITS WITH PEN AND PENCIL.—No. XXXI.—THE

LATE THEODORE SEDGWICK, OF STOCKBRIDGE, Mass.

85

(With a fine Engraving on Steel.)

XV. THE WORDS OF FAITH.–From the German of Schiller.

89

XVI. LUCY HOOPER

90

Poetical Remains of the late Lucy Hooper.

XVII. THE WHIG REGIME AT WASHINGTON

95

XVIII. MONTHLY FINANCIAL AND COMMERCIAL ARTICLE

98

XIX. THE NEW BOOKS OF THE MONTH

103

Johnston's Lectures on Agricultural Chemistry and Geology,

Burnet's Exposition of the Thirty-Nine ArticlesPearson's
Exposition of the Creed-Ewbank on Hydraulic Machines,
$c.-Rockwell's Sketches of Foreign Travel-Paine's Ma-
teria MedicaCaroline Southey's Chapters on Churchyar
Life of Peter Van SchaackThe Hamilton Papers— Ham-
mond's History of Political Parties in the State of New

York-Tasistro's Random Shots and Southern Breezes.

XX. MONTHLY LITERARY BULLETIN

108

American-English-Continental.

SALUTATXON PREFATOKX,

TO THE ELEVENTH VOLUME OF THE DEMOCRATIC REVIEW.

In the few words of “Finale TO THE TENTH VOLUME OF THE DEMOCRATIC REVIEW,” addressed to his readers in the last Number, the Editor stated that arrangements were in preparation for material improvements in its publication, highly creditable as its conduct in that respect had been during the past year to the publishers who had had it in charge; as also, that a considerably increased quantity of matter would be given to its readers. The present Number will exhibit the performance of the promise thus made. Without any increase in the price of subscription, the quantity of matter now and henceforward to be furnished is increased about seventy-five per cent., being nearly doubled ; the page and print of Blackwood and the leading English magazines being adopted with that view, together with an increase in the number of pages. The charge of publication will continue as heretofore in the hands of the Messrs. Langley; and full reliance may be placed, both on the punctuality of the appearance of the work by the first day of every month, and on the efficiency and completeness of all its mechanical and business arrangements.

With respect to its conduct and management in other respects, the Editor can have nothing farther to say, than that he will endeavor to make the Democratic Review deserve in a higher degree than it has yet known, the kind favor, on the part of its friends, which has heretofore been far more liberally bestowed upon it, both by the press and in other modes, than, as he is perfectly conscious, it has had any right to claim or expect. He will receive most valuable aid to his own efforts, during the course of the coming year, from a number of the ablest pens in the country. On this point he would refer to the Prospectus to the Eleventh Volume, which will be found on the cover to the present Number. And in conclusion he would beg leave to repeat, that, if the severe pressure and distraction of other simultaneous labors and cares have at times within the past year left their traces too manifest upon its pages, he asks for them that indulgence which he trusts not to have to invoke again.

THE EDITOR.
July, 1842.

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