The Life and Public Services of Andrew Johnson: Including His State Papers, Speeches and Addresses

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Derby & Miller, 1866 - Presidents - 554 pages
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Page 21 - This is essentially a people's contest. On the side of the Union it is a struggle for maintaining in the world that form and substance of Government whose leading object is to elevate the condition of men...
Page 128 - Heaven itself has ordained; and since the preservation of the sacred fire of liberty, and the destiny of the republican model of government, are justly considered as .deeply, perhaps as finally staked, on the experiment intrusted to the hands of the American people.
Page 373 - The fourth section of the fourth article of the constitution of the United States provides that the United States shall guarantee to every State in the Union a republican form of government, and shall protect each of them against invasion ; and on the application of the legislature or of the executive (when the legislature cannot be convened) against domestic violence.
Page 383 - Now, therefore, be it known that I, Andrew Johnson, President of the United States...
Page 324 - I propose to receive the surrender of the Army of Northern Virginia on the following terms, to wit : " Rolls of all the officers and men to be made in duplicate, one copy...
Page 251 - ... of overthrowing or interfering with the rights or established institutions of those States, but to defend and maintain the supremacy of the Constitution and all laws made in pursuance thereof and to preserve the Union, with all the dignity, equality, and rights of the several States unimpaired; that as soon as these objects are accomplished the war ought to cease.
Page 251 - ... that this war is not waged on their part in any spirit of oppression, or for any purpose of conquest or subjugation, or purpose of overthrowing or interfering with the rights or established institutions of those States, but to defend and maintain the supremacy of the Constitution, and to preserve the Union with all the dignity, equality, and rights of the several States unimpaired; and that as soon as these objects are accomplished the war ought to cease.
Page 251 - Congress, banishing all feelings of mere passion or resentment, will recollect only its duty to the whole country; that this war is not waged upon our part in any spirit of oppression, nor for any purpose of conquest or subjugation, nor purpose of overthrowing or interfering with the rights or established institutions of those States, but to defend and maintain the supremacy of the Constitution and to preserve the Union, with all the dignity, equality, and rights of the several States unimpaired;...
Page 30 - Resolved by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled, (two-thirds of both houses concurring), That the following article be proposed to the legislatures of the several States as an amendment to the constitution of the United States...
Page 79 - That the person applying for the benefit of this act shall, upon application to the register of the land office in which he or she is about to make such entry, make affidavit...

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