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ENCOURAGING TIDINGS FROM NINGPO.

143 trade. The other candidate is a needlemaker, and has been for a long time under regular instruction. Of the others, one is the teacher of Mr. Gough's boarders, and is the son of a convert. There is also another boy in the Jing-tih-dông, who is the grandson of Mr. Russell's teacher who died last year of cholera, and who commended his grandson to Mr. Russell's care. The father of the boy has given his permission to the baptism. With regard to the rest I cannot speak with certainty.

We have many come from time to time as inquirers. Some of these are receiving instruction, but at irregular intervals. Recently, brother Russell has formed a class composed of beggars, old and lame, and blind and deaf, to whom we have been in the habit of giving alms: to those we now seek to impart the true riches, the bread of life. Our brother Gough has also established morning classes twice a week for women at his house. The attendance is about 14 or 15, besides the children they bring. A French frigate and steamer recently brought from Hong Kong eleven sisters of charity to join the Roman-Catholic Bishop in his Mission here. We have heard that they have been studying the dialect at Macao for the last three years, and that they dress as Chinese. We trust that when Mrs. Cobbold arrives from England we may, under her countenance, and with God's blessing, be enabled to do much for the women of this city. The wives and the daughters of our converts are only waiting for this cause.

The tailor, Bao-s-vu, who was recommended to the Society to be engaged as a catechist, continues to give us every satisfaction, embracing every opportunity of “speaking the truth in love." As an assistant in the Missionary work he will prove very valuable. Upon a recent occasion, one, who had in the morning applied to be admitted as a candidate for baptism, in the evening brought a friend of his, a gentleman, to our evening family prayers. After the service was over, conversation ensued upon the points which had been dwelt upon by Mr. Russell, and Bao-s-vu frequently spoke with the stranger. Upon going away, the visitor asked his friend who had introduced him who was that man who spoke to him so much. On being told that he was a tailor, “ How,” said he, he know doctrines so well, being only a tailor?”It is an old question, and shows that they who have been taught by the Holy Spirit are wiser than they whose only knowledge is derived from books.

On the 6th ult. we had the privilege of admitting to the sacrament of the Lord's Supper Bao-s-vu and Ah Ling, two of our converts, for the first time; also three Chinese girls, pupils of Miss Aldersey. The service was conducted by Mr. Russell; the sermon being from Luke xxii. 19, " This do in remembrance of me." The Bishop administered the bread and wine. We afterwards heard that Miss Aldersey's pupils had said they never had attended so solemn a service. The sacramental service had recently been translated into this dialect by Messrs. Russell and Gough, assisted by Dr. M'Cartee, of the American Presbyterian Board.

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THE POOR AFFLICTED ONE. The following account of a native convert has been written by the widow of a late revered and lamented Missionary, and forwarded by her to the Calcutta “Christian Intelligencer," from whose pages we

144

THE POOR AFFLICTED ONE.

have taken it. It is a very touching instance, and shows us how, in cases of otherwise hopeless and helpless sorrow, the promises of Him who " came to seek and to save that which was lost" break in like a "day-spring from on high" on “darkness and the shadow of death," and illuminate the soul with bright hopes and unfailing consolations.

In January last, a poor sickly-looking woman presented herself to me one morning, accompanied by a girl of ten years old, and two little boys. On my asking her what she wanted, she said she had much sorrow, and was in delicate health, and she had felt a desire arising in her mind, under her distress, to become a Christian. We talked with her for some time, and feeling satisfied of her sincerity, by all we could gather from her, we made arrangements for her to reside on the premises and receive Christian instruction. Her daughter was at once placed, by her own wish, in my girls'-school. The inquiries we made concerning the character of this poor woman in the neighbouring village, in which she had resided, were satisfactory : her husband was not a good character, and her distress had often been great; but it had the happy effect of leading her to seek after spiritual blessings, and these, it is hoped, she received. It is our Saviour's own gracious assurance- “ Him that cometh to me I will in no wise cast out;" and those He invites are the weary and heavy laden. This poor woman was such, and during the few weeks she lived to receive Christian instruction, it appeared to "drop as the rain," and " distil as the dew," and was as seed falling into good and prepared ground, which quickly sprung up.

She manifested sincere sorrow for sin, and expressed that humble trust and dependence on Jesus, as a Saviour able and willing to save, which led her to look on the decline of her health, and on her approaching death, not only without fear, but with hope and peace. She gave to us all the impression of having " passed from death unto life;" and though she knew but little, that little was a saving knowledge, and enough to light her to heaven. Though very weak by the time she was considered fit for baptism, she slowly and feebly made her way to the house of God at the appointed time, and was introduced into Christ's church, and took her place as an humble member of that " little flock,” to whom it is the “ Father's good pleasure to give the kingdom.” It was a touching sight-the trembling woman, hardly able to support herself, standing beside her own and several other children, of various ages, who were all united to the visible church at the same time. Her eyes looked bright, and her poor faded countenance expressed much inward joy, which she evidently felt. About three weeks after she gently “fell asleep,” expressing to the last her simple trust in our Lord and Saviour Jesus Christ. Truly may it be said, that even the dark side of our Lord's will hath more of light in it, than the greatest brightness of this world. A poor humble Bengali female, brought up in idolatry, surrounded by heathen relatives, connected with a wicked husband, is visited by a ray of divine light, becomes illuminated, and is guided thereby to glory. “By grace are ye saved through faith; and that not of yourselves : it is the gift of God.”

W. M. Watts, Crown Court, Temple Bar,

THE

CHURCH MISSIONARY

GLEANER.

1853.

GIVE UNTO THE LORD, O YE KINDREDS OF THE PEOPLE, GIVE UNTO

THE LORD GLORY AND STRENGTH. PS. XCVI. 7.

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Printed by W. Watts, Crown Court, Temple Bar.

CONTENTS.

Missionary and Foreign Intelligence.

PAGE

WEST-AFRICA MISSION.

PAGE

.

YORUBA MISSION.

BRITISH-GUIANA MISSION.

NORTH-WEST-AMERICA MISSION.

MEDITTERRANEAN MISSION.

.

. 137

BOMBAY AND WESTERN-INDIA MISSION,

CALCUTTA AND NORTH-INDIA MISSION.

Manihera, and his murderer, HuiaConfirmation at Regent Town, Sierra

tahi

89 Leone

104
Kaitaia.

111 Wesley te Pake

135 Return of the Rev. S. Crowther to Abbeokuta (with a Cut)

16
Death of a Missionary

33 Lagos and its king

57 The Aké crier (with a Cut)

67 Abbeokuta and its converts (with a

Falling asleep in Jesus

8 Cut)

74
Moose Factory, Rupert's Land

19 Destructive fire at Abbeokuta · 128 Sanctified affliction

33 Usefulness of working parties

51

Visitation of the Sick, Moose Factory, The Jordan Baptism (with a Cut) 86 Hudson's Bay

116 The Dead Sea with a Cut).

98 The Eskimos (with a Cut).

MISCELLANEOUS Death of a Native Christian at Ka

Recollections of the coast of Africa rachi

71
(with a Cut)

2

New Mission to the Caroline Islands 5 A stray sheep brought to the fold of

80 the good Shepherd .

6

The Siamese (with a Cut)
Abdullah .

123
The Hindu convert Desai

10 The Society for promoting Female Education in the East.

21 Intended Baptism of a Hindu lady at

An incident of the Slave-trade (with Calcutta 39 a Cut)

29 Trials of Converts from Hinduism 92 Chinese justice (with a Cut)

31 in India

107

African Sailors at Woolwich Dockyard 35 The Dishonoured Idol (with a Cut) 134 Chinese thriftiness (with a Cut)

41 First Baptism by our Missionaries in Opium-smoking in Siam.(with a Cut) 46 the Punjab

141

The Medicine-man of the Indian
tribes (with a Cut)

50 The Loo-Choo Isles (with a Cut) 54 Danger and deliverance.

60 Baptism of two young students at Nasulipatam

43
Samuel, the tindal .

68 Obituary of Arokkia Nadan

76

Buddhist Priests in China (with a
Cut)

78

Where “every prospect pleases, and Kandian Baptism and Marriage

3 only man is vile” (with a Cut) 90

The reformation amongst the Armenians

94 Missionary Work at Ningpo

58

The Kingsmill Islands (with a cut) 100
Trials of Converts in India .

106 NEW ZEALAND MISSION.

The movement in China (with a Cut) 110 New Zealand as it was and is: or, past Savage Island (with a Cut)

114 and present (with a Cut) 14 Madagascar

. 120 Native traits and gospel influence 26 Rasalama, the Madagascar Martyrs · 143 The Cave at Okura, New Zealand The Red-Indian Woman (with a Cut) 122 (with a Cut) 62 The Laplapilers (with a Cut)

125 The Native Institution at Waikato

Moravian Mission to the Lepers at the Heads 64 Cape.

130

.

.

MADRAS AND EOUTH-INDIA MISSION.

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CEYLON MISSION.

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