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"O thy hound's blude was ne'er sae red,

Nor e'er sae dear to me:
O what blude 's this upon your hand ?

O dear son, tell to me. “It is the blude of my gay goss hawk;

He wadna flee for me.

“O thy hawk's bluid was ne'er sae red,

Nor e'er sae dear to me:
O what blude's this upon your dirk ?

Dear Willie, tell to me.
“It is the blude of my ae brother;

O dule and wae is me.”

“O what will ye say to your father?

Dear Willie, tell to me." “I'll saddle my steed, and awa I'll ride,

To dwell in some far countrie."

“O when will ye come hame again ?

Dear Willie, tell to me. “When sun and mune leap on yon hill,

And that will never be.”

She turn'd hersel' right round about,

And her heart burst into three : “My ae best son is deid and gane, And

my tother ane I'll ne'er see!”

FINE FLOWERS I THE VALLEY.

This favourite ballad—which exists in a variety of forms, both in Scotland and England—first appeared in Herd's Collection. Jamieson, who calls it The Cruel Brother, printed with the burden chorus

“With a heigho and a lily gay,

And the primrose blooms sae sweetly," instead of the burden more commonly used —

“Fine flowers in the valley,

The red, the green, and the yellow.”
The following is taken from Gilchrist's Collection.

THERE were three ladies in a ha',

Fine flowers the valley,
There came three lords amang

them a',
The red, green, and the yellow.

The first o' them was clad in red,
“O! lady fair, will ye be my bride?"

The second o' them was clad in green,
“O! lady fair, will ye be my queen ?”

The third o' them was clad in yellow,
“O! lady fair, will ye be my marrow?”

“O! ye maun ask my father dear,
Likewise the mother that did me bear;

“And ye maun ask my sister Ann,
And not forget my brother John,"

“O! I have asked thy father dear,
Likewise the mother that did thee bear;

“And I have asked thy sister Ann;
But I forgot thy brother John.”
Now when the wedding day was come,
The knight would take his bonny bride home.
And mony a lord, and mony a knight,
Cam' to behold that lady bright.
There was nae man that did her see,
But wished himsel bridegroom to be.
Her father led her through the ha',
Her mother danced before them a'.

Her sister Anne led her through the close, Her brother John put her on her horse. “You are high, and I am low, Give me a kiss before you go.” She was louting down to kiss him sweet, When wi' his penknife he wounded her deep. “Ride

up, ride up," said the foremost man, “I think our bride looks pale and wan." “O lead me over into yon stile, That I may stop and breathe awhile.

“O lead me over into yon stair,
For there I'll lie and bleed nae mair."

O! what will you leave to your mother dear?" “The silken gown that I did wear.” “What will you leave to your father dear?” “The milk-white steed that brought me here.”

“What will you leave to your sister Ann?” “My silken snood and golden fan.”

“ What will you leave to your brother John?” “The highest gallows to hang him on.”

“And what will you leave to your brother

John's wife?“Grief and sorrow to end her life.”

“And what will you leave to your brother

John's bairns ?” “ The world wide for them to range.”

SON DAVIE! SON DAVIE! The following, which is given from the recitation of an old woman, will strike the reader as resembling the ballad of The Twa Brothers. But it resembles more the ballad given in Percy's Reliques, beginning

“Why does zour brand sae drap wi' blood ?

Edward ! Edward !" and which was communicated by Lord Hailes. Indeed, there is reason to believe that his lordship made a few slight verbal improvements on the copy he transmitted, and altered the hero's name to Edward ; a name which, by the by, never occurs in a Scottish ballad, except where allusion is made to an English king. This, then, may be looked upon as the genuine traditionary version.—MOTHER

WELL.

“WHAT bluid 's that on thy coat lap?

Son Davie! son Davie !
What bluid 's that on thy coat lap?

And the truth come tell to me, 0.”

“It is the bluid of my great hawk,

Mother lady! mother lady!
It is the bluid of my great hawk,

And the truth I hae tald to thee, O.”

Hawk's bluid was ne'er sae red,

Son Davie ! son Davie ! Hawk's bluid was ne'er sae red,

And the truth come tell to me, O.”

“It is the bluid of my grey hound,

Mother lady! mother lady!
It is the bluid of my grey hound,

And it wudna rin for me, 0.

“Hound's bluid was ne'er sae red,

Son Davie! son Davie ! Hound's bluid was ne'er sae red,

And the truth come tell to me, O.

“It is the bluid o' my brother John,

Mother lady! mother lady!
It is the bluid o' my brother John,

And the truth I hae tald to thee, 0.”

“What about did the plea begin?

Son Davie! son Davie!” “It began about the cutting o' a willow wand,

That would never hae been a tree, O.”

“What death dost thou desire to die?

Son Davie! son Davie !
What death dost thou desire to die ?

And the truth come tell to me, 0.”

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