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That Eastern feature, Art must next produce,
Tho' not for present yet for future use. 100
Our sons some slave of greatness may behold,
Cast in the genuine Asiatic mould,
Who of three realms shall condescend to know
No more than he can spy from Windsor's brow;
For him that blessing of a better time, 105
The Muse shall deal awhile in brick and lime;
Surpass the bold A'AEAQI in design,
And o'er the Thames Aling one stupendous line
Of marble arches, in a bridge, that cuts 109
From Richmond Ferry'slant to Brentford Butts.
Brentford with London's charms will we adorn;
Brentford, the bishopric of Parson Horne.
There at one glance, the royal eye shall meet
Each varied beauty of St. James's street;

diverted with the hurry and bustle of the capital, which is there represented, several times in the year, by the eunuchs of the palace.” Page 32.

Verse 109. Of marble arches.] See Sir William's enormous account of Chinese bridges, too long to be here inserted, page 53.

Stout T*Ib*t there shall ply with hackney chair,
And Patriot Betty fix her fruit-shop there. 116
Like distant thunder now the coach of state
Rolls o'er the bridge, that groans beneath its weight.
The court hath cross’d the stream ; the sports
Now N**) preaches of rebellion's sin: [begin;
And as the powers of his strong pathos rise, 121
Lo! brazen tears fall from Sir Fl**r's eyes ;
While, skulking round the pews, that babe of grace,
Who ne'er before at sermon shew'd his face, 126
See Jemmy Twitcher shambles--stop! stop thief!
He's stol’n the E* of D*nb*h's handkerchief.

Verse 115. Stout T**t, &c.] “Some of these eunuchs personate porters.” Page 32.

Verse 116. And Patriot Betty.] “ Fruits, and all sorts of refreshments, are cried about the streets in this mock city.” Page 33. Verse 122. Lo! brazen tears, &c.]

Drew iron tears down Pluto's cheek. Milton. Verse 125. See Jemmy Twitcher shambles.] “ Neither are thieves, pickpockets, and sharpers, forgot in these festivals; that noble profession is usually allotted to a great number of the most dexterous eunuchs.” Milton.

Verse 127. Let B**n.] « The watch seizes on the culprit.” Page 33.

Let B*rr*t*n arrest him in mock fury,
And M**d hang the knave without a jury.
But hark, the voice of battle shouts from far,
The Jews and Maccaronies are at war: 130
The Jews prevail, and, thund'ring from the stocks,
They seize, they bind, and circumcise C*s F*.
Fair Schw**n smiles the sport to see,
And all the Maids of Honour cry Te! He!

Be these the rural pastimes that attend 135 Great B*nsw*k's leisure: these shall best unbend His royal mind, whene'er, from state withdrawn, He treads the velvet of his Richmond lawn; These shall prolong his Asiatic dream, Tho’Europe's balance trembles on its beam. 140

Verse 128. And M**d, &c.] He is conveyed before the judge, and sometimes severely bastinadoed.” Ibid.

Verse 129. But hark, &c.] “ Quarrels happen-battles ensue.” Ibid.

Verse 132. Circumcise C* F*] « Every liberty is permitted; there is no distinction of persons.” Ibid.

Verse 134. And all the Maids of Honour, &c.] “ This is done to divert his Imperial Majesty, and the ladies of his train.” Ibid.

And thou, Sir William ! while thy plastic hand
Creates each wonder, which thy bard has plann'd;
While, as thy art commands, obsequious rise
Whate’er can please, or frighten, or surprise,
O! let the bard his Knight's protection claim, 145
And share, like faithful Sancho, Quixote's fame!

AN

HEROIC POSTSCRIPT

TO

THE PUBLIC,

Occasioned by their favourable reception of a late Heroic

Epistle to Sir William Chambers, Knt. &c.

BY THE AUTHOR OF THAT EPISTLE.

Sicelides Musæ, paulo majora canamus.

VIRG.

I THAT of late, Sir William's Bard, and Squire, March'd with his helm and buckler on my lyre, (What time the Knight prick'd forth in ill-starr'd

haste, Comptroller General of the works of taste), Now to the public tune my grateful lays, 5 Warın'd with the sun-shine of the public praise :

Verse 1. I that of late.]
Ille ego qui quondam, &c.

VIRGIL, or somebody for hins Verse 4. Works of taste.] Put synonimously for his Majesty's works. See Sir William's title-page.

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