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P. 180 l. 15. Bois gave his vote against him. ibid. § 13:

'I have heard him, with a kind of Grief, confesse, that he gave his Voice against him. But, when he came to a more perfect Knowledge of his Worth, he expiated that Fault with an unexpressible Estimation of him. And indeed too much Honour could not readily be bestowed 5 on an Object which deserved it so well, and was so ready to reflect curtesie to all, and familiaritie where he found Desert.'

P. 180 l. 19. Andr. Downs. There are several notices of him in the life of his pupil John Bois (Peck Desid. Cur. bk. VIII). He and Bois were two of the six to review the new version of the Bible, p. 48 § 9: 'For 10 the Dispatch of which Businesse Mr Downes and Mr Bois were sent up for to London. Where meeting (though Mr Downes would not go 'till he was either fetcht or threatned with a Pursivant) their four FellowLabourers, they went dayly to Stationers' Hall, and in three Quarters of a year finished their Task. All which Time they had from the 15 company of Stationers XXXs. per Week duly paid them; tho' they had nothing before but the self-rewarding, ingenious Industry.' Downes was so jealous of Sir H. Savile's greater approbation of John Bois' notes on Chrysostom, that he was never reconciled to his pupil, who nevertheless often confessed that he was much bound to blesse God for 20 him. Downes died 2 Febr. 162 (ib. §§ 10-. -12). He has verses on Whitaker (Whitakeri Opera 1. 706); and in Epicedium Cantabr. 1612, pp. 6, 51; large notes in the appendix to Savile's Chrysostom vol. VIII. He corresponded with Casaubon in Greek, Cas. Epist. n. 108, letters to him, ibid. nos. 108, 949, 994, 1027, 1054, 1109; cf. n. 264 fin. p. 25 136; 268 fin. p. 139. He used to give private lectures in his house, which D'Ewes declined to attend on the ground of expense (Diary 3 May 1620). See ibid. 17 Mar. 1618 (1. 139) : 'I was, during the latter part of my stay at Cambridge, for the most part a diligent frequenter of Mr. Downes' Greek Lectures, he reading upon one of Demosthenes' 30 Greek orations, De Corona; of whom I think it fit to take occasion in this place to transmit somewhat to posterity, having been with him on Wednesday in the afternoon, March the 22nd, by his own desire. He had been Greek professor in the University about thirty years, and was at this time accounted the ablest Grecian of Christendom, 35 being no native of Greece; which Joseph Scaliger himself confessed of him long before, as I was informed, having received an elaborate letter from him, upon some discontent taken by him against him. When I came to his house near the public Schools, he sent for me up into a chamber, where I found him sitting in a chair with his legs upon 40 a table that stood by him. He neither stirred his hat nor body, but only took me by the hand, and instantly fell into discourse (after a word or two of course had passed between us) touching matters of learning and criticisms. He was of personage big and tall, long-faced and ruddy-coloured, and his eyes very lively, although I took him to 45 be at that time at least seventy years old.' Jo. Taylor, (Lysias, Lond. 1739 4to., praef. XV) speaking of the speech de caede Eratosthenis: 'Proxime (anno, sc. MDXCIII Cantab. in 8o) Gr. Lat. euulgauit suis praelectionibus, quas Cantabrigiae in scholis publicis habuit, illustra

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30 P. 181 n. 1. P. 437.'

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tam Andreas Dunaeus Hellenismi Professor Regius et Collegii D. Ioannis Euangelistae per pluris annos Socius bene meritus. Multum de iuuentute Academica et renascente Graecismo meruit vir ille laboriosissimus. Verum cum operosum istud praelegendi genus longe absit ab illa disciplina quam profitemur, vix operae fuisse pretium iudicaui, vt prelo iterum a me committeretur prolixior ista Commentatio.

'Andreas Dunaeus [Downes] ex agro Salopiensi oriundus, literisque institutus vna cum inclyto ROBERTO ESSEXIAE Comite, cui Lysiam inscripsit, a M. Ashton in regia Grammaticali Schola quae est Salopiae, admissus erat Discipulus Col. D. Ioan. Cant. pro Domina Fundatrice Nov. 7. 1567. [Registr. Coll. Ioan.] A. B. 157c-1. [Regr. Acad.] Socius Collegii pro M. Bayley Apr. 6. 1571. [Registr. Col.] A. M. 1574. [Regr. Acad.] S. Th. Bac. 1582. [ibid.] anno demum 1586. Graecae linguae Professor. Postquam numerosam iuuentutem literis domi informauerat, Chrysostomi editioni Sauillianae adornandae et Bibliis in linguam Anglicanam regio iussu vertendis vtilem manum admouit, vnde Praebendam in Ecclesia Wellensi meruit. Cotonae demum ad lapidem sesquiprimum a Cantabrigia et mortuus et inhumatus est A. 1627. vt ex epitaphio quod descripsi liquet

Andreas Downes Salop. Coll. D. Iohan. apud Cant. olim
Socius, Graecae linguae professor regius, quam prouinciam
summa cum fidelitate et egregia laude per vndequadraginta
annos exornauit. Vir morum Candore spectabilis, in re-

bus diuinis probe exercitus, totius a. humanioris lite-
raturae ad stuporem usque callentissimus. Iam Septua-
genarius et quod excurrit rude donatur ab Acade-
mia, reseruato tamen ei consueto honorario, anno aeta-
tis 77. secessit huc in agrum suburbanum, vbi ante annum ex-
actum postridie Cal. Feb. 1627. mortalitatem deposuit.'

Strype's Ann. III. ‘Andr. Downes solicited for Whitaker, ibid.
Wм. COLE.

P. 181 L 12. Whitaker's meetings with Fulke etc. Life of John Dod (Sam. Clarke's Lives of 32 Divines, 1677, p. 169): 'And whereas Doctor Fulk, Doctor Chaderton, Doctor Whitaker, and some others had their frequent meeting to expound the Scriptures, and therein they chose the Epistle to the Hebrews, they were pleased from their loving respect to master Dod to take him in amongst them.'

P. 181 1. 34. connivance to these men.

Whitaker writes to lord Burghley (St John's 4 Apr. 1588) defending his expulsion of Everard Digby from a fellowship. The ostensible ground was (by Stat. c. 8 de senes• calli officio) arrears with the steward. But other charges are: 'Preaching at St. Maries, he so commended voluntarie povertie, as that D. Fulk in the same place confuted him very shortly after about the same point being a popish position. He inveighed in open disputations against Calvinists as against schismatikes;' and had the reputation of being a papist, and consorting with known papists. His manners too made him a bad neighbour. He doth use to blow an horne often in the colledge on the day time, and hollow after it. He is scandalous

to the colledge by a publike challenge in the bills, set up in diverse places; being flatly forbidden to meddle in the matter. He threatened openly to set the president in the stocks, in the hearing of the schollers, then when in the maysters absence he supplied his roome. He openly cried out against the president at the same time, in the hearing of all 5 the company in the hall, these words, and in this order, and like one in a rage beating the table with his hands, repeated them often; Qui non distinguit, artem destruit quam tu non habes, Palmere, dialecticam. He called openly to the schollers standing round about the fire, and spake thus of the president (being then also in the roome of the may- 10 ster) because he was not mooved with his great words, viz. My maisters, mark this man, he hath an Italian trick; he will counterfayt a laughter when he is most angry'. Whitgift and Burghley (6 Apr.) ordered Digby's restitution (Strype's Whitgift, bk. III. Records n. 37) which Whitaker (13 Apr. 1588) protests against, 'considering how 15 unprofitable a member he was in the college, having also a benefice abroad, and never almost comyng at it.' He writes again (1 June 1588) to Burghley, deprecating his displeasure, and referring the whole case to him. See Heywood and Wright, Cambr. Univ. Trans. I. 506→ 523, 532, 533. There is a curious notice on p. 517: Though the 20 custome [that the steward should go to the seniors' chambers for money] were laudable then when the manceps, a servant, had the stewards office, yet now not to be urged of absolute necessitie, when bachelours in divinitie, doctors of physicke, law and divinitie, and the president himself, may have that office.'

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Shortly after several papers were drawn up, shewing that the college was not at peace (Registry Y. Joh. 13; MS. Baker XXVII. 76— 94). The petitions, reasons and reformations of many statuts, exhibited. . to the commissioners Sept. 1588,' which as Baker notes 'having been drawn in Dr. Whitaker's time, and probably by himself, 30 or by his direction, give a true account of the state of the college at that time.' 'Reasons moving us to make these petitions to your honours for the alteryng of some clauses of the statuts in St John's colledge'; six suggestions to the commissioners imperfect, 'ex charta lacera et biulca.' 'The master's answere to our petitions and reasons.' 35 'A satisfaction to our master his doubtes concerning our petition.' There is also a determination by Whitgift, Ric. Cosin and W. Lewyn, on the motion of Ant. Higgin and Othowell Hill, that during the vacancy of the see of Ely, the right of interpreting the statutes belongs to his grace, 30 Dec. 1591.

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P. 182 1. 3. synod of the brethren.

Bancroft, Davngerovs Positions, ed.

1593. bk. 3. c. 7. p. 92: For (as it is confessed vpon othe) at Sturbrigefaire time, the next yeare (after the sayd Classicall councell of the Warwicke-shire brethren) vz: in the yeare 1589. there was another Synode or generall meeting, held in Saint Johns Colledge in Cambridge. 45 Where (saith M. Barber) they did correct, alter, and amend diuerse imperfections conteyned in the booke, called Disciplina ecclesiæ sacra, verbo Dei descripta: and (as maister Stone affirmeth) did not onely perfect the said forme of Discipline, but also did then and there (as

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he remembreth) voluntarily agree amongst themselues, that so many as
would, should subscribe to the said booke of Discipline after that time.
The persons, that met in this assembly, were (as these two last depo-
nentes affirme,) Maister Cartwright, Maister Snape, Maister Allen,
Maister Gifford, Maister Perkins, Maister Stone, Maister Barber, Maister
Harrison, with others, &c.' Cf. ibid. 44, 45, 77, 79, 81, 85. Bancroft's
Survay, ed. 1593, c. 4. p. 67: Where this assembly was kept, I can-
not certainely affirme. But it appeareth vppon deposi-
tion, that the next yeare after [i. e. 1589], there was
one held in Sainct Johns College in Cambridge. Where
Cartwright being againe present and many moe besides :
diuerse imperfections in the saide Booke of Discipline were corrected,
altered and amended: and there they did not onely per-
fect the said Booke; but also did then and there (as the
examinate remembred) voluntarily agree amongest them-
selues, that so many as would, should subscribe to the
saide Booke of Discipline after that time.' See more on this matter in
Cooper's Ann. II. 486, 487; Strype's Whitgift, bk. IV. c. 4; Fuller
Ch. Hist., ed. Brewer, v. 150, 151, 152. Thos. Stone, parson of Wark-
ton, confessed to a meeting in St John's college, about Stourbridge
fair time was one or two years [written in 1591]: the thing debated
was the perfecting of the Book of Discipline and purpose to subscribe
it at Cambridge; the persons present, Chatterton and others of Cam-
bridge, Cartwright, Gifford, Allen, Snape, Fludd, Stone himself (ibid.
pp. 163-165); to these Fuller adds from Bancroft Wm. Perkins
and Tho. Harrison (p. 160).

Articles annexed to their booke of dis.

Maister Bar

ber examined in the Starrechamber.

The fullest account of these meetings is in Strype's Whitgift bk. IV. See Records n. 9 p. 160: Tho. Stone confesseth a meeting of Mr Cartwright, Mr. [Edm.] Snape and others at Cambridg about one or two years past; where the treatis of disciplin was perfited and a voluntary subscription thereto agreed on.' Tho. Barber adds that they conferred also about a method in preaching; and whether unpreaching ministers be ministers or not; and the sacraments be to be received of them.' Wm. Perkins confesses (p. 161) to the meeting about the discipline in St John's. On the 20 Oct. 1590 the v. c. and 6 heads wrote to Burghley, stating that Whitaker denied 'a presbiterie to be exercised in' the coll., 'movinge and desiringe to have all the societie of the fellowes of that college examined upon their othes concerninge their knowledge therin.' The same day 34 fellows including Alvey offer to take oath that we doe not know that there is amongst any of our sayd colledge, any such presbyterie as hath bene reported.' On 24 Oct. 1590 Whitaker writes to Lord Burghley from dean Nowell's house; those who have complained of him, seeing that he is resolved to come up concerning his defense, and fearing that the charge respecting a presbytery will be disproved, heap up frivolous charges. And although I partlie forsee the inconvenience of a new visitacion, whiche is the only thing that they shoot at, yet I feare not any course of justice whatsoever... I am charged that I lay at my brothers Chadertons the night before I came up. Indeed, the truthe is, I lay in the college, as I ever doe; but this was onelie a sleight to bring in some

mention of my brother, whom they hate as much as mee' (Heywood and Wright, Cambr. Univ. Trans. II. 13—16). On the 5th Nov. 1590 Jo. Palmer writes to lord Burghley, confessing that he owes to him his fellowship, a dispensation in diverting his studies from civil law to divinity, and a recommendation for the oratorship. Confesses that he 5 heard of the presbytery from Dan. Munsey the president and told one senior only. Yet though the author of the slander is known, Palmer is threatened with deprivation for publishing it (ibid. 17—19). On 27 Febr. 159 Whitaker joined with Rog. Goade, Edm. Barwell, Laur. Chaderton, in recommending to mercy 'diverse of the trew freindes 10 and lovers of the gospell,' who had 'tasted in some sort of more harde severitie then many knowen papistes' (ibid. pp. 30-32).

P. 182 n. 4. To what purpose so much sideling to save this great man, as he is often called, from the folly of puritanism, when all his works are overspread with it, in his heat against Popery, his actions in 15 college fully betrayed it, and Mr Baker himself thoroughly satisfied about it by what he says of him? Bp. Neile explains the thing.' WM. COLE.

P. 183 l. 4. decency. 'I should be glad to be informed what Dr. Stapleton thought of his adversary's lenity of temper and forbearance.' WM. 20 COLE.

P. 183 1. 13. no enemies to overcome. 'How should he, if Alvey governed

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under him, and they were all united in opinions?' WM. COLE. Whitaker wrote to Burghley 14 May 1590 in consequence of a rumour 'how that I on the Queenes day last [17 Nov.] did forbidd in our 25 College an Oration to bee made in praise of her majesties government. I thinke I am not without some bothe enemies and back-frendes; but that such a thinge should to such, and in such a place bee reported of mee, being soe utterly untrue, I cannot but marvell much.... I never forbadd nor hindred any such Oration, and wee had an Oration in our 30 College hall on that night, pronounced by one whom I appointed my selfe for that purpose, whose name is Heblethwaite, now a felow of the College; at which oration I was present, and our whole company, and divers of other Colleges, whom I sawe and can name, if neede require. The action was solemne, with bone fiers in both the courtes 35 of the College, as also it hath bene ever since I came to this College: and the report hath proceeded from some envious body, God knoweth whoe.' (Heywood and Wright, II. 12, 13; Ellis, Orig. Letters, ser. ii. III. 160.)

P. 183 l. 14 seq. Mr. Bois. From Peck Desid. Cur. bk. VIII. p. 43. See 40 on Jo. Bois Hugh Pigot's Hadleigh, Lowestoft, 1860. 8vo. pp. 112— 118, and Commun. to Cambr. Ant. Soc. II. 141, 145, 146, where I have confounded him with Jo. Boys, dean of Canterbury, author of the postills. See Wood's Fasti Oxon. 1. 276.

P. 183 1. 33.
more than probably can ever be again.
probably a mistake in Mr. Anthony Walker.'

P. 184 1. 9.

See p. 453 1. 34.

'Therefore it is most 45 WM. COLE.

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